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The Oxford Handbook of the Use of Force in International Law edited by Weller, Marc (1st January 2015)

Part VII General Problems, Ch.55 The Principle of Proportionality from a Jus Ad Bellum Perspective

Theodora Christodoulidou, Kalliopi Chainoglou

From: The Oxford Handbook of the Use of Force in International Law

Edited By: Marc Weller

From: Oxford Public International Law (http://opil.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 21 May 2019

Subject(s):
UN Charter — Self-defence — Armed conflict, international — Armed conflict, non-international — Weapons, nuclear — Armed attack — Armed forces — Terrorism — Terrorism, financing — Genocide — War crimes — Ethnic cleansing

This chapter analyses the principle of proportionality from a jus ad bellum perspective and its application in the exercise of the right of self-defence, in the use of force to protect human rights, and against terrorism. It first gives an overview of the contemporary law of the use of force as codified in the UN Charter, followed by a discussion on proportionality in customary international law. It then considers the measures by which double proportionality is calculated and, in particular, how proportionality can be measured when it seeks to meet the general objective of the use of force. Finally, the chapter examines the concept of proportionality as reflected in the judicial decisions of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) and in the legal opinions of the ICJ judges.

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