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Part IV, 14 Open Source InformationPart of the Puzzle

Fred Abrahams, Daragh Murray

From: Digital Witness: Using Open Source Information for Human Rights Investigation, Documentation, and Accountability

Edited By: Sam Dubberley, Alexa Koenig, Daragh Murray

From: Oxford Public International Law (http://opil.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 23 November 2020

Subject(s):
Access to information — Right to liberty and security of person — International criminal law — Ethical standards

The foundation of most human rights investigations has traditionally been and will likely remain research on the ground: getting as close as possible to the people affected and the places where the violations occurred. Today, however, a host of other methods exist to document, expose, and help end abuses. This chapter focuses on one of the most significant of these new tools, and the main subject of this book — the use of open source material. It focuses on how investigators can use open source material to great effect, not only where physical access is limited or denied, while also considering security, ethics and verification. This material can produce compelling information on its own and can facilitate powerful documentation, especially when used in conjunction with the traditional field-based approach and other investigative techniques.

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