Jump to Content Jump to Main Navigation

Al-Dulimi v Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research, Revision of final appeal judgment, BGer 2F_23/2016, BGE 144 I 214, ILDC 2962 (CH 2018), 31st May 2018, Switzerland; Federal Supreme Court [BGer]; Second Public Law Division

From: Oxford Public International Law (http://opil.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved. Subscriber: null; date: 30 September 2020

Parties:
Khalaf M Al-Dulimi
Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research
Judges/Arbitrators:
Hans Georg Seiler (President); Andreas Zünd; Florence Aubry Girardin; Yves Donzallaz; Thomas Stadelmann
Procedural Stage:
Revision of final appeal judgment
Previous Procedural Stage(s):
Final appeal judgment; D v Federal Department of Economic Affairs, 2A.785/2006, 23 January 2008
Related Development(s):
Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc v Switzerland, Judgment of the Chamber, App no 5809/08, 26 November 2013 (an ECtHR chamber found a violation of Article 6(1) of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms)Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc v Switzerland, Judgment of the Grand Chamber, App no 5809/08, ECHR 2016, 21 June 2016 (confirmed by the Grand Chamber of the ECtHR)
Subject(s):
Right to effective remedy — Right to fair trial — Human rights remedies — Economic sanctions — Resolutions of international organizations — Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties — Object & purpose (treaty interpretation and)
Core Issue(s):
Whether there was a conflict between a United Nations member state’s obligations under the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and Article 103 of the Charter of the United Nations.

Oxford Reports on International Law in Domestic Courts is edited by:

Professor André Nollkaemper, University of Amsterdam and  August Reinisch, University of Vienna.

Facts

F1  On 22 May 2003, the United Nations Security Council (‘Security Council’), acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations (26 June 1945) 59 Stat 1031; TS 993; 3 Bevans 1153, entered into force 24 October 1945 (‘UN Charter’), adopted Resolution 1483, UN Doc S/RES/1483, UN Security Council, 22 May 2003. Paragraph 23(b) of Resolution 1483 required member states to freeze without delay ‘funds or other financial assets or economic resources that have been removed from Iraq, or acquired, by Saddam Hussein or other senior officials of the former Iraqi regime and their immediate family members, including entities owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by them or by persons acting on their behalf or at their direction’ and to immediately transfer them to the Development Fund for Iraq.

F2  On 24 November 2003, the Security Council, by Resolution 1518, UN Doc S/RES/1518, UN Security Council, 24 November 2003, established a Sanctions Committee (‘1518 Sanctions Committee’) responsible for listing the persons and entities referred to in Paragraph 23 of Resolution 1483.

F3  On 26 April 2004, the 1518 Sanctions Committee listed Khalaf M Al-Dulimi (‘Al-Dulimi’), as well as the companies Aviatrans Anstalt, Logarcheo SA, Midco Financial SA (domiciled in Geneva and dissolved on 29 March 1999), and Montana Management Inc. Al-Dulimi was the ‘head of finance for the Iraqi secret services’. He controlled Aviatrans Anstalt and Logarcheo SA and was the president, director, and authorized agent of Midco Financial SA and one of the directors of Montana Management Inc.

F4  On 12 May 2004, Switzerland’s Federal Department of Economic Affairs (since 1 January 2013, the Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research) (‘Federal Department’) included Al-Dulimi, Midco Financial SA, and Montana Management Inc in the Swiss list of natural persons, companies, and corporations that implemented the lists established by the 1518 Sanctions Committee. As of 1 July 2004, the Federal Department initiated proceedings to seize the assets of Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc deposited in Switzerland.

F5  On 16 November 2006, the Federal Department ordered, by three separate decisions, the confiscation of the liquidation dividend of Midco Financial SA and the assets of Montana Management Inc which were deposited with two banks in Switzerland. Against these decisions, Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc filed three administrative law appeals with the Federal Supreme Tribunal, alleging a violation of fundamental procedural guarantees.

F6  The appeals were dismissed on 23 January 2008. In D v Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Final appeal judgment, 2A.785/2006, 23 January 2008 (‘Final appeal judgment’) the Federal Supreme Tribunal held that the confiscation orders were based on Resolution 1483 and the lists of persons and entities established by the 1518 Sanctions Committee; that the decisions of the 1518 Sanctions Committee left no room for domestic authorities to review the merits of the inclusions on the list; that according to Article 103 of the UN Charter and Article 30(1) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (23 May 1969) 1155 UNTS 331; 8 ILM 679 (1969); 63 AJIL 875 (1969), entered into force 27 January 1980 (‘VCLT’), the UN Charter in principle prevailed in the event of a conflict between Switzerland’s obligations under the UN Charter and those arising in particular from the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (4 November 1950) 213 UNTS 222; 312 ETS 5, entered into force 3 September 1953 (‘ECHR’); and that, therefore, Switzerland was not authorized to review the validity of Security Council decisions nor to remedy any shortcomings, subject to a possible violation by the Security Council of peremptory norms of general international law which, however, did not include the procedural safeguards contained in Article 6 of the ECHR.

F7  Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc brought an application before the European Court of Human Rights (‘ECtHR’), alleging that the confiscation of their assets had not been accompanied by a procedure complying with Article 6(1) of the ECHR.

F8  On 26 November 2013, in Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc v Switzerland, Judgment of the Chamber, No 5809/08, 26 November 2013 (‘Judgment of 26 November 2013’), which considered both the application of Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc, an ECtHR chamber found a violation of Article 6(1) of the ECHR.

F9  By judgment of 21 June 2016, in Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc v Switzerland, Judgment of the Grand Chamber; No 5809/08; ECHR 2016, 21 June 2016 (‘Judgment of 21 June 2016’), the Grand Chamber of the ECtHR confirmed this. It held, in sum, that neither Resolution 1483 nor Resolution 1518 explicitly prevented the Swiss courts from reviewing, in terms of human rights protection, the domestic measures taken pursuant to Resolution 1483 and that, therefore, there was no ‘real’ conflict between the obligations under the UN Charter and the ECHR. More generally, subject to clear or explicit wording of exclusion, Security Council resolutions must always be understood as authorizing domestic courts to exercise sufficient scrutiny over the measures implementing them, to avoid any arbitrariness. Although the Federal Supreme Tribunal did not have to rule on the appropriateness of the measures entailed by the listing of Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc, Article 6(1) of the ECHR required the domestic authorities, before executing them, to ensure that the listing was not arbitrary and that Al-Dulimi and Montana Management Inc be ‘afforded at least a genuine opportunity to submit appropriate evidence to a court, for examination on the merits, to seek to show that their inclusion on the impugned lists had been arbitrary.’ By merely verifying that their names appeared on the lists, the Federal Supreme Tribunal had failed to comply with the requirements of Article 6(1) of the ECHR.

F10  On 19 September 2016, Al-Dulimi filed an application for revision with the Federal Supreme Tribunal and requested that its Final appeal judgment of 23 January 2008 be annulled, that the Federal Department’s confiscation order of 16 November 2006 be set aside, and that the liquidation dividend of Midco Financial SA be declared at Al-Dulimi’s free disposal or, alternatively, that the case be referred back to the Federal Department for a new decision. The same day, Montana Management Inc followed suit.

F11  The Federal Department petitioned that the application for revision be admitted and that the appeal be dismissed.

Held

H1  The present procedure concerned the revision of the Federal Supreme Tribunal’s Final appeal judgment of 23 January 2008. The application for revision filed by Al-Dulimi was admissible in form and it was appropriate to proceed with the matter. (paragraphs 1, 2)

H2  It was necessary to first examine whether by admitting the present request for revision, thereby complying with the ECtHR’s Judgment of 21 June 2016, the Federal Supreme Tribunal would, in particular, be ignoring Switzerland’s obligations under the UN Charter and, consequently, the rule of primacy of Article 103 of the UN Charter. (paragraph 3)

H3  Article 103 of the UN Charter, which provided for the prevalence of member states’ obligations under the UN Charter over their obligations under any other international agreement in the event of a conflict, was a conflict resolution rule. Its implementation thus presupposed the existence of a conflict of obligations. (paragraph 3.1)

H4  Before asserting the existence of a conflict of obligations, it had to be verified whether an apparent conflict could be eliminated by interpretation which, in public international law, was carried out in accordance with or by analogy with the VCLT, particularly its Articles 31, 32, and 33. Article 31(3)(c) of the VCLT enshrined the so-called principle of systemic interpretation: ‘a text [could] not be considered in isolation from its normative environment; it [was] part of a corpus of rules of international law’. Closely linked to the principle of systemic interpretation was the ‘presumption of compatibility’ or ‘presumption against normative conflict’ which had as a corollary that when several interpretations were possible, preference should be given to the interpretation that allowed the harmonisation of two norms or obligations that apparently presented a contradiction. (paragraph 3.2)

H5  In the present case, affirming a general incompatibility between Switzerland’s obligations to respect the human rights guaranteed by the ECHR and to comply with the ECtHR’s judgments, on the one hand, and to apply the decisions of the Security Council, on the other, was not convincing. Human rights permeated the UN Charter as a whole and, in addition, were guaranteed by various instruments that had been adopted under the auspices of the United Nations; the Security Council itself was required to ‘act in accordance with the Purposes and Principles of the United Nations’ (Article 24(2) of the UN Charter), and recent developments within the United Nations had demonstrated a will to coordinate the implementation of Security Council resolutions ordering targeted sanctions with human rights guarantees. (paragraph 3.3)

H6  An existing conflict of obligations could also be denied in the particular case of Switzerland’s obligations under the ECtHR’s Final appeal judgment and its obligations under Security Council Resolution 1483. Under the ECtHR judgment, Switzerland was not obligated to review the appropriateness of the sanctions ordered by the Security Council, but only to review the possible arbitrariness of the inclusion of Al-Dulimi and his companies on the 1518 Sanctions Committee’s lists. In fact, by reducing to a strict minimum the requirements arising from the right of access to a court guaranteed by Article 6 of the ECHR, the ECtHR had taken into account the nature and purpose of the measures provided for by the Security Council and, thus, the other commitments Switzerland had undertaken. Regarding Switzerland’s obligations under Resolution 1483, in paragraph 5 of that resolution, the Security Council called ‘upon all concerned to comply fully with their obligations under international law including in particular the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and the Hague Regulations of 1907’. It followed that compliance with international law and, in particular, Switzerland’s commitments under the ECHR, was part of the obligations resulting from Resolution 1483 itself. (paragraph 3.4)

H7  As a result, the request for revision should not be rejected from the outset by reason of a conflict of international legal obligations. (paragraph 3.4.3)

H8  After the Federal Supreme Tribunal had granted the reason for revision of a judgment for violation of the ECHR under Swiss law and subsequently annulled the Judgment of 23 January 2008, (paragraph 4) it had to decide again on the administrative law appeal lodged by Al-Dulimi on 20 December 2006 against the confiscation order of 16 November 2006, taking into account the requirements arising from the ECtHR’s Final appeal judgment of 21 June 2016. The confiscation order against the liquidation dividend of Midco Financial SA had been issued by the Federal Department solely because this company and Al-Dulimi were featured on the 1518 Sanctions Committee’s list which had been included in Swiss law. With reference to paragraph 23(b) of Resolution 1483, the order was motivated by Midco Financial SA being controlled by Al-Dulimi, who was designated as a senior official of the former Iraqi regime. However, the confiscation order did not contain any facts about Al-Dulimi’s involvement in the former Iraqi regime. It was therefore not possible to determine on the basis of this decision and the 2006 case file whether it was arbitrary to consider Al-Dulimi as being a senior official of the former Iraqi regime, thus meeting the criterion set out in paragraph 23(b) of Resolution 1483. As a result, the confiscation order was to be annulled and the administrative law appeal admitted. (paragraphs 5.2.1, 5.2.2)

H9  If Al-Dulimi had been the ‘head of finance for the Iraqi secret services’, he would have been covered by paragraph 23(b) of Resolution 1483 and the funds owned or controlled by companies under his control would fall within the scope of the measures ordered by the Security Council. However, the Federal Supreme Tribunal was not able to decide the case without a complementary investigation. The case thus had to be referred back to the Federal Department which, based on a new investigation, would have to determine whether the listing of Al-Dulimi and his companies was arbitrary. The liquidation dividend of Midco Financial SA would provisionally remain frozen until the law on the issue was definitively decided. (paragraphs 5.2.3, 5.2.6)

Date of Report: 03 September 2019
Reporter(s):
Denise Wohlwend

Analysis

A1  In the present revision proceedings, the Federal Supreme Tribunal was called upon to consider again the relationship between Switzerland’s obligations under the UN Charter (Article 103) and other treaty obligations of Switzerland, in particular its obligations under the ECHR and the ECtHR’s Final appeal judgment of 21 June 2016.

A2  In declaring the absence of a real conflict between Switzerland’s obligations to respect the human rights guaranteed by the ECHR and to comply with the ECtHR’s judgments, on the one hand, and to apply the decisions of the Security Council on the other, both on a general level and in the particular case at hand, the Swiss Federal Supreme Tribunal implemented the ECtHR’s Final appeal judgment of 21 June 2016, in essence following the ECtHR’s reasoning.

A3  The ECtHR Grand Chamber’s Final appeal judgment of 21 June 2016 was an important decision in a long and complex line of judgments concerning the negative impact of sanctions ordered by the Security Council on human rights, raising among other things issues around the legal effects of the supremacy clause of Article 103 of the UN Charter (Marko Milanovic, ‘Grand Chamber Judgment in Al-Dulimi v Switzerland’, EJIL: Talk!, 23 June 2016 (accessed 2 June 2019)). In the judgment, the Grand Chamber notably made the following three points (drawn from Anne Peters, ‘The New Arbitrariness and Competing Constitutionslisms: Remarks on ECtHR Grand Chamber Al-Dulimi’, EJIL: Talk!, 30 June 2016 (accessed 2 June 2019)). First, contrary to what had been done by the Chamber in its Judgment of 26 November 2013, which had applied the ‘equivalent protection’ test (Bosphorus Hava Yollari Turizm Ve Ticaret Anonim Sirketi v Ireland, Judgment of the Grand Chamber, App no 45036/98; ECHR 2005, 30 June 2005), the Grand Chamber applied the presumption established in Al-Jedda v United Kingdom, Judgment of the Grand Chamber, App no 27021/08; ECHR 2011, 7 July 2011, para 102 and Nada v Switzerland, Judgment of the Grand Chamber, App no 10593/08; ECHR 2012, 12 September 2012, paras 171–72, according to which ‘the Security Council [did] not intend to impose any obligation on member States to breach fundamental principles of human rights’ (Final appeal judgment, para 140). As a result, Article 103 of the UN Charter was not applicable. Second, the Grand Chamber considered that the right to access a court for the purposes of Article 6(1)of the ECHR was not ‘among the norms of jus cogens in the current state of international law’ (Final appeal judgment, para 136). Third, the Grand Chamber prescribed a new standard of review for Security Council resolutions based on arbitrariness for national courts. Whereas the judgment’s human rights-friendly result was generally welcomed in international legal scholarship, the interpretative approach endorsed by the Grand Chamber—carried only by a slim majority—was criticized, especially since it was said to read into Resolution 1483 room for manoeuvre for UN member states, even though there was none (Milanovic; Peters; see also Final appeal judgment, Dissenting opinion of Judge Nussberger, para A).

A4  In implementing the ECtHR’s Final appeal judgment of 21 June 2016, the Swiss Federal Supreme Tribunal carried out (as far as possible) the arbitrariness review newly prescribed therein. The introduction of such a standard of review by the ECtHR implied that the national courts of at least 47 member states of the United Nations—namely those which were also members of the Council of Europe and the ECHR—now could control the authority exercised by the Security Council and refuse to implement its resolutions if any arbitrariness was detected. This, in turn, could not only undermine the effectiveness of the United Nations’ sanctions system, but also lead to unequal treatment of listed persons in different states (Peters; Final appeal judgment, Dissenting opinion of Judge Nussberger, paras B.1 and D).

A5  Following the 2005 World Summit Outcome, in which the United Nations General Assembly called upon the Security Council ‘to ensure that fair and clear procedures exist for placing individuals and entities on sanctions lists and for removing them’ (Resolution 60/1, 2005 World Summit Outcome, UN Doc A/RES/60/1, UN General Assembly, 16 September 2005), efforts were made to redress the negative impact of sanctions ordered by the Security Council on the human rights of those being targeted (United Nations Security Council, ‘Sanctions’ (accessed 23 June 2019)). Importantly, in 2006, a focal point for de-listing was established and, in 2009, the Office of the Ombudsperson to the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee was instituted and its powers were strengthened in subsequent years (United Nations Security Council, ‘Focal Point for De-listing’ (accessed 23 June 2019); United Nations Security Council, ‘Ombudsperson to the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee’ (accessed 23 June 2019)). Pressing ahead with these efforts, for instance by establishing ombudspersons for other sanctions regimes, such as the one at stake in the present case, appeared to be the most promising strategy to strike a balance between an effective United Nations’ sanctions system and genuine protection of human rights, given these implications of national courts reviewing the resolutions of the Security Council (Peters).

Date of Analysis: 03 September 2019
Analysis by: Denise Wohlwend

Instruments cited in the full text of this decision:

International

Charter of the United Nations (26 June 1945) 59 Stat 1031; TS 993; 3 Bevans 1153, entered into force 24 October 1945, Articles 1(3), 24(1)(2), 25, 48(2), 55(c), 103

Statute of the International Court of Justice (26 June 1945) 3 Bevans 1179; 59 Stat 1055; 33 UNTS No 993, entered into force 24 October 1945, Article 38

Universal Declaration of Human Rights, UN Doc A/RES/217A(III); UN Doc A/810 91, UN General Assembly, 10 December 1948

Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (4 November 1950) 213 UNTS 222; 312 ETS 5, entered into force 3 September 1953, Articles 1, 6(1), 41, 44, 46(1)

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (16 December 1966) 999 UNTS 171, entered into force 23 March 1976, Article 14

Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (23 May 1969) 1155 UNTS 331; 8 ILM 679 (1969); 63 AJIL 875 (1969), entered into force 27 January 1980, Articles 30(1), 31, 32, 33, 53, 64

Resolution 661, UN Doc S/RES/661, UN Security Council, 6 August 1990

Resolution 670, UN Doc S/RES/670, UN Security Council, 25 September 1990

Resolution 1483, UN Doc S/RES/1483, UN Security Council, 22 May 2003, paras 5, 23(b)

Resolution 1518, UN Doc S/RES/1518, UN Security Council, 24 November 2003

Report of the Study Group of the International Law Commission on Fragmentation of International Law: Difficulties Arising from the Diversification and Expansion of International Law, UN Doc A/CN.4/L.682, UN General Assembly, 13 April 2006

Resolution 1730, UN Doc S/RES/1730, UN Security Council, 19 December 2006

Resolution 1956, UN Doc S/RES/1956, UN Security Council, 15 December 2010

Resolution 68/178, UN Doc A/RES/68/178, UN General Assembly, 18 December 2013, para 12

Cases cited in the full text of this decision:

Swiss domestic courts

Lüscher v Federal Department of Justice and Police, Final appeal judgment, BGE 95 I 70, 14 February 1969

D SA v Land Appeals Commission of the Canton of Vaud, Final appeal judgment, BGE 101 Ib 387, 3 October 1975

R v Parole Commission of the Canton of Geneva, Final appeal judgment, BGE 104 Ib 152, 21 June 1978

Association for the Safeguarding of the Croix-de-Coeur Region and ors and Aeschbacher and ors v Federal Department of Transports, Communications and Energy, Final appeal judgment, BGE 109 Ib 246, 19 October 1983

Innomat SA v Municipality of Yvonand and Cantonal Appeals Commission for Construction of the Canton of Vaud, Final appeal judgment, BGE 116 Ib 175, 27 September 1990

Léon and Anne-Marie Mornod v Shooting Society ‘L’Arquebuse’ and State Council of the Canton of Fribourg, Final appeal judgment, BGE 117 Ib 101, 15 August 1991

Federal Tax Administration v Heirs X and Administrative Court of the Canton of Lucerne, Final appeal judgment, BGE 117 Ib 367, 15 November 1991

B v Cantonal Office for the Control of Inhabitants and Police of Foreigners of the Canton of Vaud, Final appeal judgment, BGE 121 II 97, 24 February 1995

X v Federal Office of Police, Final appeal judgment, BGE 123 II 175, 28 April 1997

Foundation X v Federal Social Insurance Office and Federal Department of Home Affairs, Final appeal judgment, BGE 124 V 265, 16 June 1998

X v State Council of the Canton of Geneva, Final appeal judgment, BGE 128 II 56, 6 November 2001

A and B v SA L’Energie de l’Ouest-Suisse and Federal Assessment Commission of the 3rd District, Final appeal judgment, BGE 129 II 420, 22 July 2003

A SA and ors v Federal Council, Final appeal judgment, BGE 130 I 312; 2 July 2004

Swisscom Fixnet AG v TDC Switzerland AG and Federal Communications Commission (ComCom), Final appeal judgment, BGE 131 II 13, 30 November 2004

G Mobile AG v Federal Communications Commission (ComCom), Final appeal judgment, BGE 132 II 485, 26 October 2006

A v Public Prosecutor’s Office of the Canton of Valais, Revision of final appeal judgment, 6F_1/2007, 9 May 2007

A v B, C, Revision of final appeal judgment, 1F_1/2007, 30 July 2007

Municipality of Böttstein v A and Government Council and Administrative Court of the Canton of Aargau, Final appeal judgment, BGE 133 II 370, 7 September 2007

Nada v State Secretariat for Economic Affairs and Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Final appeal judgment, 133 II 450, 14 November 2007

Emrah Emre v Department of Economics of the Canton of Neuchâtel, Revision of final appeal judgment, 2F_11/2008, 6 July 2009

A and ors v Political Community of Rheineck and Department of Home Affairs of the Canton of St. Gallen, Final appeal judgment, BGE 135 I 265, 7 July 2009

Association Against Animal Factories Switzerland VgT v SRG SSR Swiss Broadcasting Corporation and Publisuisse, Revision of final appeal judgment, BGE 136 I 158, 4 November 2009

Schlumpf v SWICA Health Insurance AG, Revision of final appeal judgment, BGE 137 I 86, 15 September 2010

AA and BA v C AG, Revision of final appeal judgment, BGE 142 I 42, 11 November 2015

X v Public Prosecutor’s Office of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, Revision of final appeal judgment, 6F_10/2015, 26 May 2016

X v Central Public Prosecutor’s Office of the Canton of Vaud and Y Association, Revision of final appeal judgment, 6F_6/2016, 25 August 2016

A v Disability Insurance Office of the Canton of St. Gallen, Revision of final appeal judgment, BGE 143 I 50, 20 December 2016

Federal Administration of Contributions v A, Final appeal judgment, BGE 143 II 202, 16 February 2017

A SA and B SA v C and Administrative Court of the Canton of Vaud, Final appeal judgment, BGE 133 III 562, 5 June 2017

A, B, C v Municipality of D, Final appeal judgment, 5A_951/2016, 14 September 2017

Federal Administration of Contributions v A, Final appeal judgment, BGE 144 II 130, 3 November 2017

To access full citation information for this document, see the Oxford Law Citator record

Decision - full text

Faits :

  1. A. 

    1. A.a.  Après l'invasion du Koweit par l'Irak le 2 août 1990, le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies (ci-après: le Conseil de sécurité) a adopté les résolutions 661 (1990) du 6 août 1990 et 670 (1990) du 25 septembre 1990 invitant les Etats Membres et non Membres de l'Organisation des Nations Unies (ci-après: ONU) à établir un embargo général à l'encontre de l'Irak et des ressources koweitiennes susceptibles d'être confisquées par l'occupant (paragraphes 3, 4 et 5), ainsi qu'un embargo sur les transports aériens. Le 22 mai 2003, le Conseil de sécurité, agissant en vertu du chapitre VII de la Charte des Nations Unies du 26 juin 1945 (RS 0.120; ci-après: la Charte), a adopté la résolution 1483 (2003), qui a abrogé la résolution 661 (199 0) du 6 août 1990. Le paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003) a la tene ur suivante:

      "[Le Conseil de sécurité] décide que tous les Etats membres où se trouvent: b) des fonds ou d'autres avoirs financiers ou ressources économiques sortis d'Irak ou acquis par Saddam Hussein ou d'autres hauts responsables de l'ancien régime irakien ou des membres de leur famille proche, y compris les entités appartenant à ces personnes ou à d'autres personnes agissant en leur nom ou selon leurs instructions, ou se trouvant sous leur contrôle direct ou indirect, sont tenus de geler sans retard ces fonds ou autres avoirs financiers ou ressources économiques et, à moins que ces fonds ou autres avoirs financiers ou ressources économiques n'aient fait l'objet d'une mesure ou d'une décision judiciaire, administrative ou arbitrale, de les faire immédiatement transférer au Fonds de développement pour l'Irak (…)".

      Le 24 novembre 2003, le Conseil de sécurité a adopté la résolution 1518 (2003) créant un Comité des sanctions (ci-après: le Comité des sanctions 1518) chargé de recenser les personnes et entités visées par le paragraphe 23 de la résolution 1483 (2003).

    2. A.b.  Le 26 avril 2004, le Comité des sanctions 1518 a porté le nom de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi (Khalaf M. M. Al-Dulaymi) sur la liste des personnes visées (no 74, actuellement sous no 72).

      Le Comité des sanctions 1518 a également inscrit, sur la liste des entités, les sociétés Aviatrans Anstalt (no 199), Logarcheo SA (no 200), Midco Financial SA (no 201), dont le siège était à Genève et qui a été dissoute le 29 mars 1999, ainsi que Montana Management Inc. (no 202), société de droit panaméen. Le "résumé des motifs" ayant présidé à l'inscription de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et des sociétés susmentionnées, qui se trouve sous l'inscription no 199, retient en substance que Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi était le "directeur des investissements pour le compte des services de renseignement irakiens". Il contrôlait Aviatrans Anstalt et Logarcheo SA, deux sociétés créées pour gérer les avoirs de l'ancien régime irakien et de ses hauts fonctionnaires, et était le président, administrateur et mandataire autorisé de la société Midco Financial SA, ainsi que l'un des directeurs de la société Montana Management Inc.

    3. A.c.  En Suisse, le Conseil fédéral a adopté, le 7 août 1990, l'ordonnance instituant des mesures économiques envers la République d'Irak (ci-après: l'ordonnance sur l'Irak; RS 946.206). Régulièrement modifiée, notamment le 30 octobre 2002, afin de tenir compte de l'entrée en vigueur de la loi fédérale du 22 mars 2002 sur l'application des sanctions internationales (loi sur les embargos, LEmb; RS 946.231), cette ordonnance prévoit à son article 2 le gel des avoirs et ressources économiques de l'ancien gouvernement irakien, de hauts responsables de l'ancien gouvernement et d'entreprises ou de corporations elles-mêmes contrôlées ou gérées par ceux-ci.

    4. A.d.  Le 12 mai 2004, le Département fédéral de l'économie (devenu, le 1 er janvier 2013, le Département fédéral de l'économie, de la formation et de la recherche, ci-après: le Département fédéral) a notamment inscrit les noms de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi, Midco Financial SA et Montana Management Inc. sur la liste suisse des personnes physiques, entreprises et corporations visées par l'ordonnance sur l'Irak (RO 2004 2455; depuis le 4 mars 2016, les listes établies par le Conseil de sécurité ou son comité compétent sont reprises automatiquement, cf. art. 5a ordonnance sur l'Irak [RO 2016 671]).

      Par ailleurs, le 18 mai 2004, le Conseil fédéral a adopté, sur le fondement de l'art. 184 al. 3 Cst., l'ordonnance sur la confiscation des avoirs et ressources économiques irakiens gelés et leur transfert au Fonds de développement pour l'Irak (RO 2004 2873; ci-après: l'ordonnance sur la confiscation).

  2. B. 

    1. B.a.  Dès l'entrée en vigueur de l'ordonnance sur la confiscation, le Département fédéral a engagé une procédure de confiscation des avoirs de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et de la société Montana Management Inc. déposés en Suisse, lesquels étaient déjà gelés, depuis 1990 selon les intéressés. Ceux-ci ont requis, le 25 août 2004, la suspension de la procédure, afin de pouvoir adresser une requête de radiation au Comité des sanctions 1518. Par courrier du 3 décembre 2004, le Président du Comité des sanctions a demandé à Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi de fournir des éléments justificatifs et des informations supplémentaires susceptibles d'étayer sa requête. Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi a alors demandé à être entendu oralement. Cette requête étant restée sans réponse, Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc. ont requis la reprise de la procédure de confiscation en Suisse.

    2. B.b.  Par décision du 16 novembre 2006, le Département fédéral a prononcé en faveur du Fonds de développement pour l'Irak la confiscation d'un montant de 86'276 fr. 85, correspondant au dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA. Le même jour, le Département fédéral a également prononcé, par deux décisions, la confiscation des avoirs de Montana Management Inc. déposés auprès du Crédit suisse Genève et de l'Arab Bank (Switzerland).

      Contre ces décisions, Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc. ont formé, le 20 décembre 2006, trois recours de droit administratif au Tribunal fédéral, en se plaignant essentiellement d'une violation des garanties fondamentales de procédure. Par arrêt 2A.785/2006 du 23 janvier 2008, le Tribunal fédéral a rejeté le recours de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi relatif à la confiscation du dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA et a mis à la charge du recourant un émolument judiciaire de 5'000 francs. Le Tribunal fédéral a également rejeté à cette date, pour les mêmes motifs, les recours de Montana Management Inc. relatifs à la confiscation de ses avoirs déposés auprès du Crédit suisse (arrêt 2A.783/2006) et de l'Arab Bank (Switzerland) (arrêt 2A.784/2006).

      En substance, le Tribunal fédéral a retenu que les décisions de confiscation reposaient sur la résolution 1483 (2003) et les listes des personnes et entités établies par le Comité des sanctions 1518, sur lesquelles figuraient les noms de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi, Midco Financial SA et Montana Management Inc. (consid. 5.4), que la mise en oeuvre de la résolution 1483 (2003) exigeait de la Suisse qu'elle se tienne strictement aux mesures instaurées par le Conseil de sécurité et aux décisions du Comité des sanctions 1518, qui ne laissaient aucune place à la vérification, par les autorités nationales, du bien-fondé des inscriptions (consid. 9.2), qu'en cas de conflit entre les obligations de la Suisse découlant de la Charte et celles découlant notamment de la CEDH, les premières l'emportaient en principe, conformément à l'art. 103 de la Charte, ainsi qu'à l'art. 30 par. 1 de la Convention de Vienne du 23 mai 1969 sur le droit des traités (RS 0.111) (consid. 7.2 et 7.3) et que, partant, sous réserve d'une éventuelle violation par le Conseil de sécurité de normes impératives de droit international général ( jus cogens), dont les garanties de procédure de l'art. 6 CEDH ne faisaient pas partie, la Suisse n'était pas autorisée à contrôler la validité des décisions du Conseil de sécurité, notamment de la résolution 1483 (2003), ni d'en guérir, le cas échéant, les vices (consid. 10.1). Dans ses arrêts, le Tribunal fédéral avait réservé une dernière possibilité pour Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc. de demander leur radiation des listes du Comité des sanctions 1518 auprès du Point focal pour les demandes de radiation de l'ONU, créé par la résolution 1730 (2006) du 19 décembre 2006. La demande de radiation adressée par Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc. au Point focal a été rejetée le 6 janvier 2009.

  3. C.  A la suite des arrêts du Tribunal fédéral du 23 janvier 2008, Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc. ont saisi la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (ci-après: CourEDH) d'une requête, alléguant en particulier que la confiscation de leurs avoirs par les autorités suisses avait été ordonnée en l'absence de toute procédure conforme à l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH.

    Le 6 mars 2009, le Conseil fédéral a décidé de surseoir à l'exécution des décisions de confiscation dans l'attente de l'arrêt de la CourEDH et de celui du Tribunal fédéral sur la demande de révision interne en cas de constat par la Cour d'une violation de la Convention.

  4. D.  Par sa résolution 1956 (2010) du 15 décembre 2010, le Conseil de sécurité a décidé de clôturer le Fonds de développement pour l'Irak à compter du 30 juin 2011 et de faire transférer les produits de ce Fonds aux comptes des mécanismes successeurs du gouvernement irakien. L'ordonnance sur la confiscation a été adaptée pour tenir compte de cette modification (cf. art. 5 de l'ordonnance sur la confiscation; RO 2013 2151). Cette ordonnance est devenue caduque le 1er janvier 2014 (RO 2015 933). L'ordonnance sur l'Irak, qui prévoit le gel des avoirs, demeure en vigueur.

  5. E.  Alors que la cause devant la CourEDH était pendante, Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc. ont sollicité auprès des autorités fédérales la levée de toute mesure de gel, embargo ou autre restriction sur leurs avoirs, au motif de l'adoption par le Conseil des Etats le 8 septembre 2009 et par le Conseil national le 4 mars 2010 de la motion parlementaire 09.3719 intitulée "Les fondements de notre ordre juridique court-circuités par l'ONU", déposée par l'ancien conseiller aux Etats Dick Marty le 12 juin 2009 (ci-après: la motion Dick Marty). Par décision du 22 février 2011, le Département fédéral a déclaré cette requête, considérée comme une demande de réexamen, irrecevable. Saisi d'un recours contre cette décision, le Tribunal administratif fédéral l'a confirmée par arrêt du 29 février 2012.

    Par arrêt du 18 mars 2013 (2C_349/2012), le Tribunal fédéral a rejeté dans la mesure de sa recevabilité le recours formé contre l'arrêt du 29 février 2012 par Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et Montana Management Inc.

  6. F. 

    1. F.a.  Le 26 novembre 2013, statuant simultanément sur la requête de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi et celle formée par Montana Management Inc., une chambre de la deuxième section de la CourEDH a rendu un arrêt concluant, à la majorité, à la violation de l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH.

      Le 25 février 2014, le Gouvernement suisse a sollicité le renvoi de l'affaire devant la Grande Chambre, qui a fait droit à cette demande le 14 avril 2014.

    2. F.b.  Par arrêt du 21 juin 2016, la Grande Chambre de la CourEDH a dit, par quinze voix contre deux, qu'il y avait eu violation de l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH et a rejeté, à l'unanimité, la demande de satisfaction équitable des requérants.

      En résumé, la CourEDH a considéré que "ni le paragraphe 23 de la résolution 1483 (2003), ni aucune autre disposition de ce texte, ni la résolution 1518 (2003) — compris suivant le sens ordinaire des termes qui y [étaient] employés — n'interdisaient explicitement aux tribunaux suisses de vérifier, sous l'angle du respect des droits de l'homme, les mesures prises au niveau national en application de la première de ces résolutions" (§ 143). La CourEDH a partant estimé qu'il n'y avait pas de "vrai" conflit d'obligations entre celles résultant de la Charte et celles découlant de la CEDH, contrairement à ce qu'avait retenu le Tribunal fédéral (§ 149). De manière générale, la CourEDH a estimé que "lorsqu'une résolution du Conseil de sécurité ne contient pas une formule claire et explicite excluant la possibilité d'un contrôle judiciaire des mesures prises pour son exécution, elle doit toujours être comprise comme autorisant les juridictions nationales à effectuer un contrôle suffisant pour permettre d'éviter l'arbitraire" (§ 146, cf. aussi § 140). Admettant que le Tribunal fédéral n'avait pas à se prononcer sur le bien-fondé ou l'opportunité des mesures que comportait l'inscription des requérants sur les listes du Comité des sanctions 1518 (§ 150), la CourEDH a néanmoins considéré que, pour respecter l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH, les autorités suisses auraient dû s'assurer de l'absence de caractère arbitraire de cette inscription avant d'exécuter des mesures à leur encontre (§ 150) et que les requérants auraient dû "disposer au moins d'une possibilité réelle de présenter et de faire examiner au fond, par un tribunal, des éléments de preuve adéquats pour tenter de démontrer que leur inscription sur les listes litigieuses était entachée d'arbitraire" (§ 151). En vérifiant uniquement que les noms des requérants figuraient sur les listes, le Tribunal fédéral avait méconnu les exigences de l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH.

  7. G.  Le 19 septembre 2016, Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi a formé au Tribunal fédéral une demande de révision, concluant, sous suite de frais et dépens, sur rescindant, à l'annulation de l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral 2A.785/2006 du 23 janvier 2008, et, sur rescisoire, à l'annulation de la décision de confiscation du Département fédéral du 16 novembre 2006 et à ce qu'il soit dit que le dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA est à sa libre disposition, subsidiairement à ce que la cause soit renvoyée au Département fédéral pour nouvelle décision.

    Le même jour, Montana Management Inc. a déposé deux demandes de révision, l'une portant sur l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral 2A.783/2006 du 23 janvier 2008 relatif à la confiscation de ses avoirs déposés auprès du Crédit suisse (Genève) (cause 2F_21/2016) et l'autre portant sur l'arrêt 2A.784/2006 du 23 janvier 2008 relatif à la confiscation de ses avoirs déposés auprès de l'Arab Bank (Switzerland) (cause 2F_22/2016). Le Conseil de sécurité et la République d'Irak ont été invités à se déterminer sur la présente demande de révision par courriers du 25 octobre 2016. Il n'ont pas donné suite à cette invitation.

    Le 27 avril 2017, le Département fédéral a conclu, sur rescindant, à l'admission de la demande de révision, et, sur rescisoire, au rejet du recours et au maintien de sa décision du 16 novembre 2006. Il a joint à sa réponse notamment 13 pièces constituant des "documents rassemblés en 2017 suite aux demandes de révision". Le 20 juin 2017, le Département fédéral a transmis spontanément au Tribunal fédéral 11 pièces supplémentaires.

    Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi a répliqué le 31 juillet 2017. Tout en maintenant ses conclusions initiales, il a conclu à ce que tous les faits et pièces nouveaux invoqués et produits par le Département fédéral soient déclarés irrecevables, à ce que soit ordonnée, en cas de renvoi, l'instruction complète de la cause et à ce que soit réservé dans ce contexte son droit de requérir l'audition de témoins, une ou des expertises, et toute autre mesure probatoire. Il a joint à sa réplique un bordereau de 12 pièces.

    Le Département fédéral a dupliqué en réitérant ses conclusions initiales. Il a produit deux nouvelles pièces. Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi a déposé des observations finales, dans lesquelles il persiste dans l'entier de ses développements et conclusions.

    Par courrier du 20 mars 2018, le Département fédéral a transmis au Tribunal fédéral cinq nouveaux documents reçus des autorités irakiennes.

  8. H.  Le 31 mai 2018, la Cour de céans a délibéré sur la présente demande de révision en séance publique.

Considérant en droit :

1.  La présente procédure porte sur la révision de l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral 2A.785/2006 du 23 janvier 2008.

1.1.  L'arrêt dont la révision est demandée a été rendu en application des dispositions de la loi fédérale du 16 décembre 1943 d'organisation judiciaire (Organisation judiciaire, OJ; RS 3 521). La demande de révision ayant été introduite après l'entrée en vigueur de la LTF le 1 er janvier 2007, la procédure de révision est toutefois régie par le nouveau droit (cf. art. 132 al. 1 LTF; ATF 136 I 158 consid. 1 p. 162; arrêt 6F_1/2007 du 9 mai 2007 consid. 1, non publié in ATF 133 IV 142).

1.2.  La procédure de révision auprès du Tribunal fédéral se déroule en plusieurs phases (cf. arrêt 6F_10/2015 du 26 mai 2016 consid. 1.2.1). Tout d'abord, le Tribunal fédéral examine la recevabilité de la demande. Pour les questions qui ne sont pas traitées dans le chapitre 7 de la LTF relatif à la procédure de révision, les dispositions générales de la LTF s'appliquent (cf. PIERRE FERRARI, in Commentaire de la LTF, 2 e éd. 2014, n o 9 ad art. 128 LTF). Si le Tribunal fédéral estime la demande de révision recevable, il entre alors en matière et examine si le motif de révision allégué est réalisé. Si tel est le cas, le Tribunal fédéral rend successivement deux décisions distinctes, même s'il le fait en règle générale dans un seul arrêt: par la première, dénommée le rescindant, il annule l'arrêt formant l'objet de la demande de révision; par la seconde, appelée le rescisoire, il statue sur le recours dont il avait été précédemment saisi (cf. art. 128 al. 1 LTF). La décision d'annulation met fin à la procédure de révision proprement dite et entraîne la réouverture de la procédure antérieure. Elle sortit un effet ex tunc, si bien que le Tribunal fédéral et les parties sont replacés dans la situation où ils se trouvaient au moment où l'arrêt annulé a été rendu, la cause devant être tranchée comme si cet arrêt n'avait jamais existé (cf. ATF 137 I 86 consid. 7.3.4 p. 101; arrêts 5A_951/2016 du 14 septembre 2017 consid. 4.3; 6F_10/2015 du 26 mai 2016 consid. 1.2.1; 2F_11/2008 du 6 juillet 2009 consid. 4.1; 1F_1/2007 du 30 juillet 2007 consid. 3.3).

2.  Le requérant fonde sa demande de révision sur l'art. 122 LTF, selon lequel la révision d'un arrêt du Tribunal fédéral peut être demandée lorsque la CourEDH a constaté, dans un arrêt définitif, une violation de la CEDH ou de ses protocoles.

2.1.  La recevabilité d'une demande de révision fondée sur l'art. 122 LTF est subordonnée au fait qu'elle soit déposée devant le Tribunal fédéral au plus tard 90 jours après que l'arrêt de la CourEDH est devenu définitif au sens de l'art. 44 CEDH (art. 124 al. 1 let. c LTF; cf. ATF 143 I 50 consid. 1.1 p. 53). En outre, le requérant doit avoir la qualité pour former une demande de révision et, notamment, disposer d'un intérêt actuel à obtenir un nouveau jugement sur le point litigieux

(cf. arrêts 6F_6/2016 du 25 août 2016 consid. 1; 6F_10/2015 du 26 mai 2016 consid. 1.2.2; 2F_11/2008 du 6 juillet 2009 consid. 2; 1F_1/2007 du 30 juillet 2007 consid. 3.3).

2.2.  En l'occurrence, la Grande Chambre de la CourEDH a constaté une violation de l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH par arrêt du 21 juin 2016, définitif dès sa reddition (cf. art. 44 par. 1 CEDH). Déposée le 19 septembre 2016, la demande de révision a été introduite en temps utile. Partie à la procédure ayant abouti à l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral dont la révision est demandée, le requérant, dont les avoirs sont toujours bloqués, bénéficie de la qualité pour agir et d'un intérêt actuel à obtenir la levée de cette mesure. Au surplus, la demande de révision indique le motif de révision invoqué et en quoi consiste la modification de l'arrêt sollicitée. La demande de révision est donc recevable en la forme (cf. art. 42 al. 1 et 2 LTF) et il convient d'entrer en matière.

2.3.  Le requérant conclut à ce que les pièces produites par le Département fédéral dans le cadre de la demande de révision soient déclarées irrecevables. Ces pièces ne sont pas pertinentes au stade du rescindant. Elles sont produites par le Département fédéral en lien avec le rescisoire et leur portée sera examinée dans ce contexte.

3.  Lors de la séance publique de la Cour de céans du 31 mai 2018, il a été relevé et soutenu qu'en admettant la présente demande de révision et en se conformant par là même à l'arrêt de la CourEDH du 21 juin 2016, le Tribunal fédéral méconnaîtrait les obligations de la Suisse découlant de la Charte des Nations Unies du 26 juin 1945 (RS 0.120; ci-après: la Charte) et partant la règle de primauté de l'art. 103 de la Charte, ainsi que sa jurisprudence antérieure exposée dans l'ATF 133 II 450 ( Nada). Il convient donc en premier lieu d'examiner si l'on se trouve dans une telle situation, étant précisé, d'une part, que le Département fédéral ne s'est pas opposé à la présente demande de révision et, d'autre part, que le Conseil de sécurité, invité à se déterminer, ne s'est pas prononcé.

3.1.  Selon l'art. 103 de la Charte, "en cas de conflit entre les obligations des Membres des Nations Unies en vertu de la présente Charte et leurs obligations en vertu de tout autre accord international, les premières prévaudront". Cette règle vise aussi bien les obligations imposées par la Charte que celles qui en découlent, comme les décisions du Conseil de sécurité agissant en application du chapitre VII, obligatoires en vertu de l'art. 25 de la Charte, qui dispose que "les membres de l'Organisation conviennent d'accepter et d'appliquer les décisions du Conseil de sécurité conformément à la présente Charte" (cf. ATF 133 II 450 consid. 5.2 p. 457; JEAN-MARC THOUVENIN, in La Charte des Nations Unies, Commentaire article par article, Cot/Pellet/ Forteau (éd.), 3 e éd. 2005, p. 2133 ss, p. 2135 ad art. 103 de la Charte; PAULUS/LEISS, in The Charter of the United Nations, A Commentary, Simma et al. (éd.), 3 e éd. 2012, p. 2110 ss, p. 2124, n o 38 ad art. 103 de la Charte).

L'art. 103 de la Charte, qui instaure la primauté des obligations découlant de la Charte sur les obligations découlant de tout autre accord international, est une règle de résolution des conflits d'obligations (cf. THOUVENIN, op. cit., p. 2146; ROBERT KOLB, L'art. 103 de la Charte des Nations Unies, in Recueil des cours de l'Académie de droit international, vol. 367, 2013, p. 25 ss, p. 119–123, 235 ss, 242–246, qui soulignent que l'art. 103 de la Charte n'est en revanche pas une règle de hiérarchie des normes). La mise en oeuvre de l'art. 103 de la Charte suppose donc comme condition objective l'existence d'un conflit d'obligations (cf. KOLB, op. cit., p. 124, 145 ss, 243; PAULUS/LEISS, op. cit., p. 2116, n o 11, p. 2121, n o 29).

3.2.  Avant d'affirmer l'existence d'un conflit d'obligations nécessitant le recours à l'art. 103 de la Charte, il y a lieu de vérifier si un tel conflit apparent ne peut pas être éliminé par le biais de l'interprétation (cf., dans ce sens, ATF 133 II 450 [ Nada] consid. 6.2 p. 460; KOLB, op. cit., p. 124; PAULUS/LEISS, op. cit., p. 2120, no 21 ss p. 2123 no 36).

L'interprétation du droit international public s'opère conformément à (s'agissant de traités), ou par analogie avec (s'agissant notamment d'actes unilatéraux tels que ceux du Conseil de sécurité), la Convention de Vienne du 23 mai 1969 sur le droit des traités (CV; RS 0.111; ci-après: CV ou Convention de Vienne), en particulier les dispositions de ses art. 31 à 33 relatives à l'interprétation (sur les particularités de l'interprétation des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité, cf. STEFAN KADELBACH, Interpretation of the Charter, in The Charter of the United Nations, A Commentary, Simma et al. (éd.), 3e éd. 2012, p. 71 ss, p. 96 et Cour internationale de justice [CIJ], Conformité au droit international de la déclaration unilatérale d'indépendance relative au Kosovo, avis consultatif du 22 juillet 2010, Recueil CIJ 2010, p. 403, par. 94). L'art. 31 par. 1 CV prévoit qu'un traité doit être interprété de bonne foi suivant le sens ordinaire à attribuer aux termes du traité dans leur contexte et à la lumière de son objet et de son but (s'agissant de la portée de ce premier paragraphe, cf. ATF 144 II 130 consid. 8.2.1 p. 139; 143 II 202 consid. 6.3.1 p. 207 s.; 628 consid 4 2 1 637)

En plus du contexte (cf. art. 31 par. 2 CV), il sera tenu compte, selon l'art. 31 par. 3 CV, de tout accord ultérieur intervenu entre les parties au sujet de l'interprétation du traité ou de l'application de ses dispositions (let. a); de toute pratique ultérieurement suivie dans l'application du traité par laquelle est établi l'accord des parties à l'égard de l'interprétation du traité (let. b) et de toute règle pertinente de droit international applicable dans les relations entre les parties (let. c) (cf. ATF 144 II 130 consid. 8.2.1 p. 139). La lettre c du paragraphe 3 de l'art. 31 CV, qui situe l'interprétation des traités par rapport à l'ensemble du droit international (cf. MARC E. VILLIGER, Commentary on the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, 2009, p. 432, no 24), consacre l'interprétation dite systémique: un texte ne peut être considéré isolément de son environnement normatif; il s'inscrit dans un corpus de règles de droit international (traités, coutume, principes généraux, cf. art. 38 du statut de la Cour internationale de Justice du 26 juin 1945, RS 0.193.501), qui doit être pris en compte (cf. Commission du droit international [CDI], Fragmentation du droit international, Rapport du groupe d'étude de la Commission du droit international, 13 avril 2006, doc. NU A/CN.4/L.682 et Corr. 1 [cité ci-après: CDI, Fragmentation], par. 410 ss; DISTEFANO/MAVROIDIS, L'interprétation systémique: le liant de l'ordre international, in Mélanges en l'honneur de Pierre Wessner, Guillod/Müller (éd), 2011, p. 743 ss, p. 744).

Il convient de présumer dans l'interprétation d'un texte de droit international qu'un Etat (ou une organisation internationale) agit conformément au droit existant ("présomption de compatibilité" ou "présomption contre le conflit normatif"; cf. JOOST PAUWELYN, Conflicts of Norms in Public International Law, 2003, p. 237 ss, p. 240–241; CDI, Fragmentation, par. 37 et 38; cf. aussi sur cette présomption, KOLB, op. cit., p. 125–131; cf. CIJ, Droit de passage sur territoire indien [exceptions préliminaires] [Portugal c. Inde], arrêt du 26 novembre 1957, Recueil CIJ 1957 p. 125, p. 21 de l'arrêt). Cette présomption de conformité, étroitement liée au principe de l'interprétation systémique, a notamment pour corollaire que lorsque plusieurs interprétations sont possibles, il est préférable de choisir l'interprétation qui permet l'harmonisation de deux normes ou obligations qui présentent une contradiction apparente (cf. PAUWELYN, op. cit., p. 240–241). La CourEDH privilégie également cette interprétation harmonisante. Elle retient ainsi que "deux engagements divergents doivent être autant que possible harmonisés de manière à leur conférer des effets en tous points conformes au droit en vigueur" (CourEDH [GC], Nada c. Suisse du 12 septembre 2012, Recueil des arrêts et décisions 2012-V, § 169–170; Al-Dulimi c. Suisse du 21 juin 2016, fondant la présente demande de révision, § 138; Al-Adsani c. Royaume-Uni du 21 novembre 2001, Recueil des arrêts et décisions 2001-XI, § 55). On relèvera en outre que l'interprétation harmonisante des règles du droit international correspond à certains égards à l'interprétation conforme des normes du droit interne au droit international ou des normes internes de rang inférieur à la Constitution, qui est régulièrement pratiquée par le Tribunal fédéral et vise elle aussi à prévenir le conflit de règles autant que faire se peut (cf. ATF 117 Ib 367 consid. 2f p. 373; cf. HÄFELIN/HALLER/KELLER/THURNHERR, Schweizerisches Bundestaatsrecht, 9e éd. 2016, p. 39 et 42). L'expression "interprétation conforme" présuppose toutefois une relation de hiérarchie entre les règles à interpréter, qui n'existe pas, de manière générale, entre les différentes normes du droit international (exception faite du jus cogens; cf. art. 53 et 64 CV).

3.3.  En l'espèce, le conflit d'obligations peut tout d'abord être envisagé à un niveau général. A ce niveau, les obligations de droit international supposées entrer en conflit sont l'obligation de la Suisse de respecter les droits de l'homme garantis par la CEDH (art. 1 CEDH) et de se conformer, dans les litiges auxquels elle est partie, aux arrêts de la CourEDH (cf. art. 46 par. 1 CEDH) d'une part, et, d'autre part, l'obligation de la Suisse d'appliquer les décisions du Conseil de sécurité (cf. art. 25 de la Charte; cf. aussi art. 48 par. 2 de la Charte). La Cour de céans considère qu'affirmer une incompatibilité de principe entre les obligations relatives au respect des droits de l'homme et les obligations découlant des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité prises en vue de maintenir la paix et la sécurité internationales (cf. art. 24 par. 1 de la Charte) n'est toutefois pas convaincant, pour les motifs qui suivent.

3.3.1.  Les droits de l'homme imprègnent l'ensemble de la Charte des Nations Unies, ainsi qu'en témoigne déjà son préambule ( Nous, peuples des Nations Unies, résolus à […] proclamer à nouveau notre foi dans les droits fondamentaux de l'homme […]). Il est en particulier fait référence au respect des droits de l'homme à l'art. 1 de la Charte, qui énumère les buts de l'organisation. Selon le paragraphe 3 de cette disposition, les Nations Unies ont notamment pour but de "réaliser la coopération internationale (…) en développant et en encourageant le respect des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales pour tous, sans distinction de race, de sexe, de langue ou de religion". Outre que les droits de l'homme font partie des buts de l'organisation, il est exposé à l'art. 55 let. c de la Charte que les Nations Unies favoriseront "le respect universel et effectif des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales".

Les droits de l'homme sont en outre garantis par divers instruments adoptés sous les auspices de l'ONU, à commencer par la Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme, adoptée par l'Assemblée générale des Nations Unies le 10 décembre 1948 (résolution 217 A), à laquelle la CEDH fait référence dans son préambule. Il faut aussi mentionner le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques du 16 décembre 1966 (RS 0.103.2), qui contient des dispositions analogues à la CEDH, notamment s'agissant de l'accès à un tribunal (cf. art. 14 Pacte ONU II). Les préambules de ces deux textes se réfèrent aux principes énoncés dans la Charte des Nations Unies.

Au vu de ces dispositions, garantir le respect des droits de l'homme dans l'exécution d'obligations découlant de la Charte, y compris d'obligations découlant de résolutions du Conseil de sécurité prises en vertu de la Charte, ne saurait être considéré a priori comme contraire à la Charte.

3.3.2.  Par ailleurs, le Conseil de sécurité est lui-même tenu d'agir, dans l'accomplissement de ses devoirs tenant à sa responsabilité principale du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales, "conformément aux buts et principes des Nations Unies" (art. 24 par. 2 de la Charte). A priori également, le Conseil de sécurité ne devrait donc pas imposer d'obligations aux Etats membres contraires aux droits de l'homme, conclusion à laquelle la CourEDH aboutit aussi (CourEDH [GC], Al-Jedda c. Royaume-Uni du 7 juillet 2011, Recueil des arrêts et décisions 2011-IV, § 101–102). Le Tribunal fédéral ne peut que se rallier à cette approche.

3.3.3.  Enfin, il convient de souligner les développements survenus au sein de l'ONU s'agissant du respect des droits de l'homme dans l'application des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité. A cet égard, il y a en particulier lieu de mentionner la résolution de l'Assemblée générale des Nations Unies du 18 décembre 2013 relative à la protection des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales dans la lutte antiterroriste (Doc. NU A/RES/68/178). Au paragraphe 12 de cette résolution, l'Assemblée générale engage en effet "instamment les Etats à veiller, tout en s'employant à respecter pleinement leurs obligations internationales, au respect de l'état de droit et à prévoir les garanties nécessaires en matière de droits de l'homme dans les procédures nationales d'inscription de personnes et d'entités sur des listes aux fins de la lutte antiterroriste".

Bien que portant sur la question spécifique de la lutte antiterroriste, rien n'indique que la position exprimée par l'Assemblée générale des Nations Unies dans cette résolution ne soit pas pertinente pour d'autres listes des comités des sanctions du Conseil de sécurité et a fortiori celles établies en lien avec la situation en Irak.

Il se dégage ainsi une volonté de coordonner la mise en oeuvre des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité ordonnant des sanctions ciblées avec les garanties relatives aux droits de l'homme. Cette volonté exprimée au sein des Nations Unies confirme qu'on ne peut partir du principe que le respect des secondes remet automatiquement en cause le respect (et donc ultimement l'efficacité) des premières.

3.3.4.  Cette manière d'envisager les rapports entre les obligations de la Suisse découlant des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité et celles relatives au respect des droits de l'homme n'est pas en contradiction avec l'ATF 133 II 450, qui s'était concentré sur les conséquences de l'existence d'un conflit d'obligations, en examinant les effets de l'art. 103 de la Charte, sans rechercher au préalable si les obligations pouvaient se coordonner — ce que la CourEDH lui a finalement reproché (cf. CourEDH, arrêt Nada précité, § 197).

3.3.5.  La Suisse est du reste consciente de la problématique du respect des droits de l'homme en lien avec les sanctions prononcées par le Conseil de sécurité. Une motion a été déposée le 12 juin 2009 par le Conseiller aux Etats Dick Marty sur ce thème, qui a été adoptée par le Conseil des Etats le 8 septembre 2009 et par le Conseil national le 4 mars 2010. Le Conseil fédéral s'est vu impartir un délai pour atteindre l'objectif visé par la motion, délai qui a été prolongé jusqu'à la session de décembre 2018.

3.4.  Le principe de l'interprétation systémique et harmonisante étant ainsi énoncé et envisagé dans un contexte général, il convient encore de vérifier si, dans le cas particulier, les obligations résultant de l'arrêt de la CourEDH entrent en conflit avec les obligations imposées par la résolution 1483 (2003) du Conseil de sécurité.

3.4.1.  Dans son arrêt, la CourEDH a constaté une violation de l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH au motif que le requérant et sa société Montana Management Inc. n'avaient pas disposé d'une possibilité de présenter et de faire examiner au fond, par un tribunal, des éléments de preuve adéquats pour tenter de démontrer que leur inscription sur les listes du Comité des sanctions 1518 était entachée d'arbitraire. L'exécution de cet arrêt requiert par conséquent que le requérant et sa société aient accès à une procédure juridictionnelle. Selon le paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003), la Suisse est "tenue de geler sans retard" les fonds ou autres avoirs financiers des hauts responsables de l'ancien régime irakien, y compris les entités appartenant à ces personnes ou à d'autres personnes agissant en leur nom ou selon leurs instructions et "de les faire immédiatement transférer au Fonds de développement pour l'Irak" (respectivement aux mécanismes successeurs, cf. résolution 1956 (2010), citée supra point D). Le Comité des sanctions 1518 a recensé le requérant et ses sociétés parmi les personnes et entités visées par le paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003).

3.4.2.  L'obligation de garantir un accès à la justice n'entre pas en conflit à ce stade avec celle d'exécuter la résolution 1483 (2003). S'agissant des obligations de la Suisse découlant de l'arrêt de la CourEDH, la Cour de céans note que le bien-fondé des sanctions, à savoir le gel des avoirs et des biens des hauts responsables de l'ancien régime irakien et des entités leur appartenant ou sous leur contrôle, ne fait pas l'objet du contrôle exigé par la CourEDH (§ 150). Par ailleurs, la Cour de céans relève que la CourEDH a pris en compte dans son raisonnement la nature et le but des mesures prévues par le Conseil de sécurité. Elle a en effet limité le contrôle à effectuer dans le cas d'espèce à un contrôle de l'éventuel caractère arbitraire de l'inscription du requérant et de ses sociétés sur les listes du Comité des sanctions 1518, afin de maintenir un juste équilibre entre la nécessité de veiller au respect des droits de l'homme et les impératifs de protection de la paix et de la sécurité internationales (§ 146). En réduisant à son strict minimum, dans le sens précité, les exigences découlant du droit d'accès à un tribunal garanti à l'art. 6 CEDH, la CourEDH a tenu compte des autres engagements de la Suisse.

S'agissant des obligations de la Suisse au titre de la mise en oeuvre de la résolution 1483 (2003), la Cour de céans remarque qu'au paragraphe 5 de cette résolution, le Conseil de sécurité demande "à toutes les parties concernées de s'acquitter pleinement de leurs obligations au regard du droit international, en particulier les Conventions de Genève de 1949 et le Règlement de La Haye de 1907". Si l'accent est mis sur les Conventions de Genève, force est de relever que le respect du droit international et partant notamment des engagements de la Suisse au titre de la CEDH fait partie des obligations résultant de la résolution 1483 (2003) elle-même. La Cour de céans note en outre que les avoirs du requérant et de ses sociétés sont gelés et qu'il n'y a pas de motif à ce stade de les libérer (cf. infra consid. 5). Le contrôle exigé par la CourEDH n'a ainsi d'incidence que sur le transfert de ces fonds, différé jusqu'à droit jugé. Si, au terme du contrôle juridictionnel, il apparaît que l'inscription du requérant et de ses sociétés sur les listes du Comité des sanctions 1518 est entachée d'arbitraire, les fonds devront être libérés. Il convient en effet de constater que la résolution 1483 (2003) n'est pas à comprendre comme excluant un contrôle individuel du bien-fondé d'une inscription dans une procédure nationale (cf. supra consid. 3.3.2 et 3.3.3).

3.4.3.  Il résulte de ce qui précède que la demande de révision n'a pas à être rejetée d'emblée en raison d'un conflit d'obligations internationales.

4.  Le requérant allègue que le motif de révision de l'art. 122 LTF est réalisé. Selon cette disposition, la révision d'un arrêt du Tribunal fédéral pour violation de la CEDH peut être demandée lorsque la CourEDH a constaté, dans un arrêt définitif, une violation de la CEDH ou de ses protocoles (let. a), qu'une indemnité n'est pas de nature à remédier aux effets de la violation (let. b) et que la révision est nécessaire pour remédier aux effets de la violation (let. c). Il faut que ces conditions cumulatives soient réunies pour que le motif de révision de l'art. 122 LTF soit admis (cf. ATF 143 I 50 consid. 1.2 p. 53).

4.1.  Selon l'art. 122 let. a LTF, il est ainsi tout d'abord nécessaire que la CourEDH ait constaté, dans un arrêt définitif, une violation de la CEDH ou de ses protocoles. Dans son arrêt du 21 juin 2016, définitif, la CourEDH a constaté une violation de l'art. 6 par. 1 CEDH. La condition de l'art. 122 let. a LTF est donc remplie.

4.2.  Conformément à l'art. 122 let. b LTF, il faut ensuite qu'une indemnité ne soit pas de nature à remédier aux effets de la violation. La jurisprudence a précisé au sujet de cette condition que, lorsque sont en cause des intérêts matériels pour lesquels la violation de la Convention pourrait en principe être intégralement réparée par un dédommagement et que la Cour a refusé ce dédommagement en raison de l'absence d'un dommage ou parce qu'elle ne s'est pas prononcée sur l'existence d'un dommage faute d'une demande dans ce sens, la révision par le Tribunal fédéral n'entre plus en considération (ATF 143 I 50 consid. 2.2 p. 54; 137 I 86 consid. 3.2.2 p. 90). En revanche, la révision est admissible lorsque la CourEDH, après avoir constaté une violation de droits procéduraux, a rejeté la demande de satisfaction équitable (cf. art. 41 CEDH, correspondant à une indemnisation) en raison d'une absence de lien de causalité entre le constat de la violation et le dommage matériel allégué (cf. ATF 142 I 42 consid. 2.2.4 p. 47).

En l'occurrence, la violation de la Convention, qui consiste en une restriction injustifiée du droit d'accès à un tribunal, ne peut pas être réparée par une indemnisation. La CourEDH a du reste rejeté la demande de satisfaction équitable formée par le requérant en raison de l'absence de lien entre le constat de violation des droits procéduraux du requérant et le dommage matériel allégué (§ 159). La condition de l'art. 122 let. b LTF est donc réalisée.

4.3.  Enfin, selon l'art. 122 let. c LTF, la révision doit être nécessaire pour remédier aux effets de la violation. Cette condition est réalisée lorsque la procédure devant le Tribunal fédéral aurait eu ou aurait pu avoir une issue différente sans la violation de la Convention et que par conséquent les effets préjudiciables de la décision initiale persistent (cf. ATF 143 I 50 consid. 2.3 p. 55; 142 I 42 consid. 2.3 p. 47 s.; 137 I 86 consid. 3.2.3 p. 91 et 7.3.1 p. 97).

Dans le cas d'espèce, la révision de l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral du 23 janvier 2008 est nécessaire au sens de l'art. 122 let. c LTF, car le seul moyen de réparer la violation de la CEDH constatée par la CourEDH est de garantir au requérant que sa cause soit entendue par un tribunal indépendant et impartial.

4.4.  Le motif de révision de l'art. 122 LTF est par conséquent donné, ce que le Département fédéral ne conteste du reste pas. Il convient partant, conformément à l'art. 128 al. 1 LTF, d'annuler l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral 2A.785/2006 du 23 janvier 2008 et de statuer à nouveau.

5.  Par conséquent, le Tribunal fédéral doit se prononcer à nouveau sur le recours de droit administratif formé par le recourant le 20 décembre 2006 contre la décision de confiscation du 16 novembre 2006.

5.1.  Il sied de rappeler les règles de procédure applicables. Comme la décision de confiscation du 16 novembre 2006 a été prise par le Département fédéral avant l'entrée en vigueur, le 1 er janvier 2007, de la LTF, c'est l'ancienne loi d'organisation judiciaire (citée supra consid. 1.1; ci-après: aOJ), qui s'applique, conformément à l'art. 132 al. 1 LTF, étant précisé que cette règle de droit intertemporel vaut également lorsque le Tribunal fédéral doit statuer à nouveau après avoir admis un motif de révision prévu dans la LTF (cf., de manière implicite, ATF 137 I 86 consid. 8.2 p. 101 s. et consid. 10 non publié; arrêt 1F_1/2007 du 30 juillet 2007 consid. 3.3).

Sous l'empire de l'aOJ, le recours de droit administratif pouvait être formé pour violation du droit fédéral, y compris l'excès ou l'abus du pouvoir d'appréciation, ainsi que pour constatation inexacte ou incomplète des faits pertinents (art. 104 let. a et b aOJ; ATF 132 II 485 consid. 1.2 p. 492). Le Tribunal fédéral revoyait d'office l'application du droit fédéral, comprenant notamment les droits constitutionnels du citoyen et le droit international (ATF 130 I 312 consid. 1.2 p. 318). En ce qui concerne les faits, lorsque, comme en l'espèce, l'autorité intimée n'était pas une autorité judiciaire, le Tribunal fédéral pouvait revoir d'office et librement les constatations de fait (cf. art. 104 let. b et 105 al. 1 aOJ; ATF 132 II 485 consid. 1.2 p. 492 s.; 128 II 56 consid. 2b p. 60; 124 V 265 consid. 2 p. 267; 123 II 175 consid. 1b p. 179). Cela impliquait que le Tribunal fédéral pouvait aussi en principe prendre en considération des faits postérieurs à la décision entreprise et des nouveaux moyens de preuve (cf. ATF 132 II 485 consid. 1.3 p. 493; 131 II 13 consid. 3.3 p. 19 s.; 121 II 97 consid. 1c p. 99 a contrario; 115 II 213 consid. 2 p. 215 s.; 109 Ib 246 consid. 3b p. 249; cf., dans le cadre d'un nouvel arrêt rendu à la suite de l'admission d'un motif de révision, JEAN-FRANÇOIS POUDRET, Commentaire de la loi fédérale d'organisation judiciaire du 16 décembre 1943, vol. V, articles 136–171, 1992, no 2 ad art. 144 aOJ).

Par ailleurs, lorsque le Tribunal fédéral annulait la décision attaquée, il pouvait soit statuer lui-même sur le fond, au besoin après avoir procédé à une nouvelle administration des preuves, soit renvoyer l'affaire pour nouvelle décision à l'autorité inférieure (cf. art. 114 al. 2 aOJ; ATF 101 Ib 387 consid. 7 p. 396 s.). Il lui appartenait de décider s'il voulait statuer sur le fond ou renvoyer la cause (cf. ATF 133 II 370 consid. 2.2 p. 373; cf. CYRILLE PIGUET, Le renvoi de la cause par le Tribunal fédéral, thèse Lausanne 1993, p. 174 ss). Un renvoi se justifiait notamment lorsque les constatations de fait pertinentes faisaient défaut ou étaient incomplètes (cf. ATF 133 III 562 consid. 4.5 p. 567; 129 II 420 consid. 8 p. 437; 117 Ib 101 consid. 3 p. 104 et consid. 5 non publié; 116 Ib 175 consid. 4 p. 184 s.; 104 Ib 152 consid. 2b p. 156; 101 Ib 387 consid. 7 p. 396 s.; 95 I 70 consid. 4 p. 78 s.).

5.2.  Le pouvoir d'examen du Tribunal fédéral sous l'empire de l'aOJ étant posé, il convient d'examiner la décision de confiscation du Département fédéral du 16 novembre 2006, en tenant compte des exigences découlant de l'arrêt de la CourEDH du 21 juin 2016.

5.2.1.  Pour rappel, la CourEDH a admis que le Tribunal fédéral n'avait pas à se prononcer sur le bien-fondé ou l'opportunité des mesures que comportait l'inscription des requérants [le recourant et la société Montana Management Inc.] sur les listes du Comité des sanctions 1518. En revanche, avant d'exécuter ces mesures, les autorités nationales auraient dû s'assurer de l'absence de caractère arbitraire de cette inscription et les requérants auraient dû disposer au moins d'une possibilité réelle de présenter et de faire examiner au fond, par un tribunal, des éléments de preuve adéquats pour tenter de démontrer que leur inscription sur les listes litigieuses était entachée d'arbitraire (§ 150 et 151 de l'arrêt).

5.2.2.  Le Tribunal fédéral doit faire en sorte que les exigences précitées soient observées.

La décision de confiscation du 16 novembre 2006 a été prise par le Département fédéral du seul fait que le recourant et sa société Midco Financial SA figuraient sur la liste des personnes, respectivement des entités, établie par le Comité des sanctions 1518 et reprise en droit suisse. La décision renvoie au paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003). En vertu du paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003), les mesures de gel et de transfert prévues s'appliquent aux fonds ou autres avoirs financiers ou ressources économiques sortis d'Irak (i.) ou acquis par Saddam Hussein (ii.) ou acquis par d'autres hauts responsables de l'ancien régime irakien ou des membres de leur famille proche, y compris les entités appartenant ou sous le contrôle direct ou indirect de ces personnes (iii.). C'est parce que Midco Financial SA était sous le contrôle du recourant, désigné comme étant un haut responsable de l'ancien régime irakien, que le dividende de liquidation de cette société a été gelé. La décision de confiscation ne contient toutefois aucun fait au sujet de l'implication du recourant dans l'ancien régime irakien. On ne peut donc pas déterminer sur la base de cette décision et du dossier de 2006 s'il est arbitraire de considérer que le recourant était un haut responsable de l'ancien régime irakien, remplissant ainsi le critère fixé au paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003). Dans ces conditions, la décision ne peut qu'être annulée et le recours de droit administratif admis.

5.2.3.  Ainsi qu'il a été relevé (cf. supra consid. 5.1), en cas d'annulation, le Tribunal fédéral peut soit statuer lui-même sur le fond, soit renvoyer l'affaire pour nouvelle décision à l'instance inférieure (art. 114 al. 2 aOJ).

Selon le "résumé des motifs" du Comité des sanctions 1518 (cf. supra point A.b), le recourant et ses sociétés figurent sur les listes établies par ce comité parce qu'il aurait été le "directeur des investissements pour le compte des services de renseignements irakiens". Si tel est le cas, il n'est pas contesté que le recourant entre dans la catégorie des "hauts responsables de l'ancien régime irakien" visée par le paragraphe 23 let. b de la résolution 1483 (2003), et que ses fonds, avoirs financiers ou ressources économiques, ainsi que les fonds appartenant ou sous contrôle d'entreprises qu'il contrôle, tombent sous le coup des mesures ordonnées par le Conseil de sécurité.

Le Département fédéral a produit au cours de la présente procédure un certain nombre de pièces qui démontreraient, selon cette autorité, qu'il n'est pas arbitraire de considérer que le recourant était le directeur des investissements pour le compte des services de renseignements irakiens.

Le recourant conteste la recevabilité de ces pièces et, sur le fond, s'en prend fermement à leur contenu. Sous l'angle de l'aOJ, la production de telles pièces n'est pas d'emblée exclue, de sorte que le recourant ne peut être suivi lorsqu'il conclut à leur irrecevabilité. Cela étant, sur le fond, le Tribunal fédéral n'est pas en mesure de statuer en l'état du dossier. En effet, le recourant conteste certaines pièces, notamment le document dans lequel il aurait reconnu, en 1994, qu'un certain compte auprès du Crédit Suisse à Genève, enregistré à son nom, appartenait au Service des projets faisant partie du Service des renseignements de Bagdad (pièce 1) et le jugement pénal irakien rendu par défaut le 27 octobre 2015 faisant état d'un détournement de fonds par le recourant en 2003 "alors qu'il travaillait en qualité de directeur auprès de l'ancien Service de renseignements irakien" (pièce 2); d' autres pièces, dont certaines sont caviardées, n'apportent pas d'éclairage décisif (par exemple les articles de presse référencés en pièces 5 et 12). Il en découle qu'une instruction complémentaire est nécessaire. Il convient de préciser que la limitation du contrôle à la question de savoir si l'inscription du recourant sur la liste est arbitraire ne signifie pas que l'administration des preuves et l'établissement des faits puissent être effectués de manière superficielle ou que le pouvoir de cognition des autorités soit lui-même limité à l'arbitraire. En d'autres termes, il s'agit de déterminer, à la suite d'une appréciation libre des preuves réunies, si l'inscription du recourant sur la liste peut être qualifiée d'arbitraire.

Il y a partant lieu de renvoyer la cause au Département fédéral. Le Tribunal fédéral ne fera pas usage de la possibilité d'instruire lui-même la cause. Si le Tribunal fédéral procédait, comme le requiert le Département fédéral, à l'établissement des faits et à l'appréciation des preuves dans le cas d'espèce, il statuerait en effet en première et unique instance, ce qui n'est pas son rôle et ce qui priverait le recourant d'un degré de juridiction (cf. ATF 133 III 562 consid. 4.5 p. 567).

Il appartiendra donc au Département fédéral d'instruire la cause, puis de déterminer si l'inscription du recourant et de ses sociétés sur les listes du Comité des sanctions 1518 est entachée d'arbitraire et de rendre une nouvelle décision en conséquence, dans le respect des exigences découlant de l'arrêt de la CourEDH du 21 juin 2016. Cela suppose en particulier qu'il se prononce en fonction des faits et de la situation juridique actuels et non en se replaçant à l'époque de sa première décision, sauf à enlever toute portée pratique à l'arrêt de la CourEDH.

5.2.4.  Contre la nouvelle décision du Département fédéral, le recourant disposera des voies de droit en vigueur depuis le 1er janvier 2007, à savoir un recours au Tribunal administratif fédéral (cf. art. 31 ss LTAF [RS 173.32]), qui possède un plein pouvoir d'examen en fait et en droit (cf. art. 49 PA [RS 172.021] applicable par le renvoi de l'art. 37 LTAF), puis éventuellement au Tribunal fédéral (cf. art. 82 ss LTF). Il convient de souligner que, comme l'organisation judiciaire actuelle a renforcé les droits procéduraux et l'accès au juge (cf. art. 29a Cst.), le renvoi de la cause à l'autorité précédente pour qu'elle se prononce à nouveau apparaît plus favorable au recourant. Ce renvoi est ainsi pleinement conforme aux exigences découlant de l'arrêt de la CourEDH du 21 juin 2016.

5.2.5.  La Cour de céans n'ignore pas que le renvoi de la cause pose problème au regard de l'exigence de célérité. Le recourant conclut toutefois lui-même au renvoi, de sorte qu'il ne saurait se plaindre d'un retard à statuer (cf. sur le principe de célérité, ATF 135 I 265 consid. 4.4 p. 277).

Le recourant conclut certes également, de manière pour le moins ambigüe, à la libération de ses avoirs en raison d'une violation du principe de célérité. La longueur de la procédure ne peut toutefois en aucun cas conduire à la levée des mesures prises. Libérer les avoirs pour ce motif reviendrait en effet à régler définitivement le litige et à faire perdre toute portée aux sanctions de l'ONU. Au surplus, on ajoutera que la durée de la procédure est essentiellement liée à la procédure devant la CourEDH (de 2008 à 2016). On ne voit en revanche pas que le recourant puisse reprocher aux autorités suisses un retard injustifié à statuer.

5.2.6.  L'annulation de la décision du 16 novembre 2006 ne préjuge en rien du bien-fondé de la mesure de confiscation du dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA. Elle ne saurait partant conduire à la libération des avoirs comme le requiert le recourant. Des mesures conservatoires seront sur ce point ordonnées, en ce sens que le dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA restera bloqué jusqu'à droit jugé définitivement sur la procédure de confiscation.

6. 

6.1.  En résumé, s'agissant de la procédure 2F_23/2016, le motif de révision est admis et l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral 2A.785/2006 du 23 janvier 2008 annulé. Le requérant, qui obtient gain de cause pour la procédure de révision, ne supporte pas les frais judiciaires (cf. art. 66 al. 1 LTF). Le montant de l'avance de frais de 5'000 fr. sera restitué sur la relation bancaire no 204950 au nom de Khalaf M. Al-Dulimi auprès de l'Arab Bank (Switzerland), sur laquelle les fonds bloqués nécessaires pour s'en acquitter ont été, avec l'accord du Secrétariat d'Etat à l'économie, prélevés. Assisté d'un mandataire professionnel, le requérant a droit à des dépens, qui seront mis à la charge de la Caisse du Tribunal fédéral (art. 68 al. 1 et 2 LTF). Compte tenu des circonstances, les dépens seront versés directement au conseil du requérant.

6.2.  Dans la procédure 2A.785/2006, le recours de droit administratif est admis. La décision de confiscation du 16 novembre 2006 est annulée et la cause est renvoyée au Département fédéral pour qu'il prenne une nouvelle décision. Le dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA, se montant à 86'276 fr. 85, restera bloqué jusqu'à droit jugé définitivement sur la procédure de confiscation.

Il n'est pas perçu de frais judiciaires (art. 156 al. 1 et 2 aOJ), de sorte que le montant de 5'000 fr. versé à ce titre en exécution de l'arrêt 2A.785/2006 du 23 janvier 2008 doit être restitué, sur le compte de la relation bancaire Montana Management Inc. no 213731 auprès de l'Arab Bank (Switzerland), sur laquelle les fonds bloqués nécessaires pour s'en acquitter avaient été, avec l'accord du Secrétariat d'Etat à l'économie, prélevés. Le recourant a droit à des dépens, à la charge du Département fédéral (art. 159 aOJ). Celui-ci les versera directement en mains du conseil du recourant.

Par ces motifs, le Tribunal fédéral prononce :

  1. 1.  Le motif de révision est admis et l'arrêt rendu le 23 janvier 2008 par la IIe Cour de droit public du Tribunal fédéral dans la cause 2A.785/2006 est annulé.

  2. 2.  Le Tribunal fédéral se prononce dans la cause 2A.785/2006 comme suit:

    1. "1.  Le recours est admis. La décision du 16 novembre 2006 du Département fédéral est annulée. La cause est renvoyée au Département fédéral, afin qu'il rende une nouvelle décision dans le sens des considérants.

    2. 2,  Le dividende de liquidation de la société Midco Financial SA, se montant à 86'276 fr. 85, reste bloqué jusqu'à droit jugé définitivement sur la procédure de confiscation.

    3. 3.  Il n'est pas perçu de frais judiciaires.

    4. 4.  La Confédération (Département fédéral de l'économie, de la formation et de la recherche, DEFR) versera un montant de 3'000 fr. au mandataire du recourant, à titre de dépens.

    5. 5.  [communications]".

  3. 3.  Il n'est pas perçu de frais judiciaires pour la procédure de révision.

  4. 4.  La Caisse du Tribunal fédéral versera un montant de 3'000 fr. au mandataire du requérant à titre de dépens pour la procédure de révision.

  5. 5.  Le présent arrêt est communiqué au mandataire du requérant, au Département fédéral de l'économie, de la formation et de la recherche (DEFR), ainsi qu'au Secrétariat d'Etat à l'économie.

Lausanne, le 31 mai 2018

Au nom de la IIe Cour de droit public du Tribunal fédéral suisse

Le Président: Seiler

La Greffière: Kleber