Jump to Content Jump to Main Navigation
Urgenda Foundation (on behalf of 886 individuals) v The State of the Netherlands (Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment), First instance decision, HA ZA 13-1396, C/09/456689, ECLI:NL:RBDHA:2015:7145, ILDC 2456 (NL 2015), 24th June 2015, Netherlands; The Hague; District Court

Urgenda Foundation (on behalf of 886 individuals) v The State of the Netherlands (Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment), First instance decision, HA ZA 13-1396, C/09/456689, ECLI:NL:RBDHA:2015:7145, ILDC 2456 (NL 2015), 24th June 2015, Netherlands; The Hague; District Court

From: Oxford Public International Law (http://opil.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 20 January 2019

Parties:
Urgenda Foundation
The State of the Netherlands (Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment) (Netherlands [nl])
Additional parties:
(Victim - "On behalf of") 886 individuals
Judges/Arbitrators:
HFM Hofhuis (President); JW Bockwinkel; I Brand
Procedural Stage:
First instance decision
Subject(s):
Right to life — NGOs (Non-Governmental Organizations) — Sustainable development — Climate change — Precautionary principle — Public policy — Consistent interpretation — Customary international law — Separation of powers
Core Issue(s):
Whether a state had, by not sufficiently limiting the volume of annual greenhouse gas emissions, failed to meet its duty of care towards a non-governmental organization by taking into account its obligations under the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, and the customary ‘no harm’ principle.

Oxford Reports on International Law in Domestic Courts is edited by:

Professor André Nollkaemper, University of Amsterdam and  August Reinisch, University of Vienna.

Facts

F1  Prior to 2010, the Netherlands had committed itself to lowering its total greenhouse gas emission to 70 per cent of the 1990 emission levels by the year 2020. After 2010, the Netherlands assumed a new policy, which required the total greenhouse gas emission to be lowered to 86-83 per cent of the 1990 levels. This new target was based on the then current European Union (‘EU’) greenhouse gas emission target of 80 per cent of 1990 emissions by the year 2020.

F2  On 12 November 2012, the Urgenda Foundation (‘Urgenda’), a non-government organization, formally requested the Dutch state to commit and undertake to reduce CO2 emissions in the Netherlands by 40 per cent by the year 2020, as compared to the emissions in 1990.

F3  The Netherlands confirmed the importance of a strong policy framework that would keep the long-term perspective of an 80–95 per cent CO2 reduction by 2050 within reach, but refrained from increasing the Dutch reduction target for 2020.

F4  On 20 November 2013, Urgenda filed a case against the Dutch government at The District Court of The Hague, acting on its own behalf as well as on behalf of 886 individuals.

F5  Urgenda argued that the Netherlands had not pursued an adequate climate policy and therefore had acted contrary to its duty of care towards Urgenda, the individuals it was representing and, more generally, Dutch society. Urgenda contended that by wrongly exposing the international community to the risk of dangerous climate change—by pursuing a reduction target that was lower than the target of 25–40 per cent endorsed by the parties during the 2010 United National Climate Conference in Cancun, resulting in serious and irreversible damage to human health and the environment—the Netherlands’ climate policy constituted an infringement of Articles 2 and 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (4 November 1950) 213 UNTS 222; 312 ETS 5, entered into force 3 September 1953 (‘ECHR’). Moreover, under national and international law, including the customary ‘no harm’ principle, Article 21 of the Constitution, 17 February 1983 (The Netherlands) (the ‘Constitution’), the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (9 May 1992) 1771 UNTS 107; entered into force 21 March 1994 (‘Climate Change Convention’), the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (11 December 1997) UN Doc FCCC/CP/1997/7/Add. 1; entered into force 16 February 2005 (‘Kyoto Protocol’), and Article 191 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (25 March 1957) Official Journal C 326 (2012); entered into force 1 January 1958 (‘TFEU’), the Netherlands had an obligation to ensure a reduction of the Dutch emission level in order to prevent dangerous climate change.

F6  The Netherlands argued that Urgenda partially had no cause of action in so far as it defended the rights of current or future generations of non-Dutch nationals. While acknowledging the need to limit the global temperature rise, the Netherlands further argued that it had pursued an adequate climate policy and that, in any case, it could not be forced to pursue another climate policy. The Netherlands submitted that it had no legal obligation—either arising from national or international law—to take measures to achieve the reduction targets stated in Urgenda’s claims. It argued that its climate policy was not in breach of Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR. Furthermore, allowing the claim would have been contrary to the government’s discretionary power and the system of separation of powers and would harm the Netherlands’ negotiating position in international politics.

F7  Urgenda requested The Court to order the Netherlands to reduce, or to have reduced, the joint volume of its annual greenhouse gas emissions by 40 per cent by the end of 2020 and in any case by at least 25 per cent, and, alternatively, to reduce emissions by at least 40 per cent by 2030, compared to 1990. In addition, Urgenda requested declaratory judgments stating, among other things, that the Netherlands would have acted unlawfully if it failed to reduce annual greenhouse gas emissions by 40 per cent and in any case at least 25 per cent, compared to 1990, by the end of 2020.

Held

H1  Article 3:303a of the Civil Code, 1 January 1992 (Netherlands) (‘Dutch Civil Code’) recognized the right of environmental groups to institute public interest cases insofar as they represented these interests in their by-laws. Urgenda’s by-laws stipulated that it strived for a more sustainable society, a term which had by its nature an inherent international and inter-generational dimension. Furthermore, Urgenda had relied on legally relevant norms as laid down in Article 2 of the Climate Change Convention and Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR. Since the invocation of these Articles could be viewed as aiming at protecting the objectives formulated in its by-laws, Urgenda was permitted to bring a claim representing the interests of international and inter-generational persons, insofar as it acted on its own behalf. (paragraphs 4.6–4.9)

H2  The ‘no harm’ principle, the Climate Change Convention, and the Kyoto Protocol only involved obligations of the Netherlands towards other states, not towards citizens. Therefore Urgenda could not directly rely on them. However, it was generally acknowledged that open standards of national law had to be interpreted in light of the Netherlands’ relevant international obligations, including obligations derived from EU law. Therefore, courts could take account of these international obligations as having a ‘reflex effect’ in national law. (paragraphs 4.42–4.44)

H3  Similarly, since the climate policy of the Netherlands did not directly breach Urgenda’s personal rights and Urgenda could therefore not have been designated as a direct or indirect victim within the meaning of Article 34 of the ECHR, Urgenda could not rely on Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR. Nevertheless, these Articles could serve as an interpretive source when implementing the open standard of Article 6:162 of the Dutch Civil Code. In this context, the principles of environmental law and the scope of protection of Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR, as derived from the rulings of The European Court of Human Rights, and the Manual on human rights and the environment, Council of Europe, 2006 were relevant. (paragraphs 4.45–4.47)

H4  Although Urgenda could not directly derive rights from the ‘no harm’ principle and the international conventions on which it had based its claim, these sources still played a role in determining whether the Netherlands had failed to meet its duty of care towards Urgenda. First, these rules could influence the degree of discretionary power to which the Netherlands was entitled and second, they could be relevant in determining the minimum degree of care it was expected to observe. (paragraph 4.52) Relevant principles in this respect were, among others, the fairness principle, the precautionary principle, and the sustainability principle contained in Articles 2 and 3 of the Climate Change Convention. Furthermore, Article 191 of the TFEU included a number of relevant principles, such as the principle of a high protection level. (paragraphs 4.56 and 4.60)

H5  Overall, the question of whether the Netherlands was exercising due care with its current climate policy depended on whether, according to objective standards, the reduction measures it had taken to prevent hazardous climate change were sufficient, also in view of its discretionary power. Several factors needed to be taken into account when establishing this duty of care, including the nature, extent, and foreseeability of the damage ensuing from climate change and the Netherlands’ discretion to execute its public duties. (paragraph 4.63)

H6  ‘Due to the severity of the consequences of climate change and the great risk of climate change occurring’, the Netherlands had a duty of care to take mitigation measures. The greenhouse gas emission reduction target of the Netherlands did not meet the standard which was accepted in climate science and required in international climate policy. Postponement of mitigation efforts would have significantly contributed to the risk of hazardous climate change and were therefore not accepted as a sufficient alternative to the scientifically proven reduction path of lowering emissions to 60–75 per cent of the 1990 emission levels by the year 2020. This established reduction path was not so disproportionately burdensome for the Netherlands that there should be deviation from this target. The Netherlands therefore had failed to fulfil its duty of care and had acted unlawfully towards Urgenda. (paragraphs 4.83–4.86)

H7  Urgenda’s claim did not fall outside the scope of the judicial power, since it essentially concerned legal protection and therefore required judicial review. The fact that allowing the claim could have had political consequences or damage the Netherlands’ negotiation position in international politics was no reason for curbing the judge in his or her task and authority to settle disputes. Therefore, the government’s discretionary power and the system of separation of powers did not constitute an obstacle to allowing the claim. (paragraphs 4.98–4.102)

H8  Insofar as Urgenda acted on behalf of the 886 claimants, its claim was rejected. Even if it was assumed that these individuals could rely on Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR, their claims could not lead to a conclusion other than the one on which Urgenda could rely for itself, since they did not have sufficient own interests besides those of Urgenda. The question of locus standi of the individual citizens was therefore left unanswered. (paragraph 4.109)

H9  The Netherlands was required to limit the joint volume of Dutch annual greenhouse gas emissions to at least 75 per cent of the 1990 emission levels by the end of 2020. (paragraphs 5.1–5.2)

Date of Report: 05 January 2016
Reporter(s):
Miriam Quené

Analysis

A1  By expanding the existing doctrine of ‘danger creation’, The Court created an historic precedent for climate change mitigation in the future. Its reasoning was largely based on the standard of due care mentioned in Article 6:162 of the Dutch Civil Code and the 1965 ‘Cellar Hatch’—Kelderluik—case, Kelderluik arrest, The Coca-Cola Export Corporation v Duchateau, Judgment on appeal in cassation, NJ 1966, 136; ECLI:NL:HR:1965:AB7079; 5 November 1965, in which The Court decided that someone who had created a serious risk of certain and immediate personal injury or property damage could be held liable for any injuries that occurred as a result of that risk creating act or omission.

A2  In the instant case, The Court decided to expand the ‘Cellar Hatch’ liability doctrine in three ways. First, it ruled that the doctrine included acts or omissions of states, not only of private persons. Second, it held that the doctrine covered omissions to address dangers created by all activities conducted within Dutch territory. Third, The Court stated that the doctrine applied not only to certain, immediate, individualized danger, but also to generalized, multi-causal danger, such as climate change. Ultimately, The Court based all of these expansions on international principles of environmental law, such as the precautionary principle, the right to life, the right to respect for private and family life, the ‘no harm’ principle, and the obligation to provide for a high level of environmental protection, by making use of the well recognized ‘reflex effect’ of international obligations in national law.

A3  The Court took an activist approach by expanding the Dutch doctrine of negligence to include climate change as an unlawful danger that had to be avoided by the Dutch government based on its duty of care. Although it found that the relevant obligations of the state under international law were not directly enforceable by Urgenda, it imported all of these obligations to establish the scope of the state’s duty of care towards Urgenda: ‘[D]ue to the nature of the hazard (a global cause) and the task to be realized accordingly […], the objectives and principles, such as those laid down in the UN Climate Change Convention and the TFEU, should also be considered in determining the scope for policymaking and duty of care’. (paragraph 4.55)

A4  In Dutch legal writing, this reasoning has been subject to criticism, since Articles 93 and 94 of the Constitution determined that rights of individuals could only be derived from provisions of international law that are considered binding on all persons by virtue of their contents. The 1986 case, Spoorwegstaking, NV Nederlandse Spoorweg v FNV and ors, Judgment on appeal in cassation, LJN AC9402; ECLI:NL:HR:1986:AC9402, 30 May 1986, specified that rules of international law could be considered binding on all persons only if they were formulated with such clarity, specificity, and focus on individuals that they could be applied directly, without any need for additional national legislation further implementing the rule. Although there was widespread agreement that some rights contained in the ECHR and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (16 December 1966) 999 UNTS 171, entered into force 23 March 1976 met this standard, most international obligations needed to be implemented in Dutch national law before they can bind individuals. In KJ de Graaf and JH Jans, ‘The Urgenda Decision: Netherlands Liable for Role in Causing Dangerous Global Climate Change’ (2015) 27(3) J Environmental Law 517, de Graaf and Jans therefore argued that the manner of interpretation by which The Court took international law into account in applying the vague norm of ‘due care’ in national legislation was contrary to Dutch constitutional law.

A5  A similar activist approach was taken by The Court when discussing the issue of the trias politica. Previous Dutch cases determined that the separation of powers prevented a court from intervening in the process of political decision-making by ordering the state to introduce formal legislation—Stichting Waterpakt v Netherlands, Judgment on appeal in cassation, LJN AE8462; C01/327HR; ECLI:NL:PHR:2003:AE8462, 21 March 2003 (‘Waterpakt’). However in the instant decision, The Court stated that ‘the possibility—and in this case even certainty—that the issue is also and mainly the subject of political decision-making is no reason for curbing the judge in his task and authority to settle disputes.’ (paragraph 4.98) The Court further defended its judgment by holding that Dutch law did not provide for a strict division, but rather a balanced system between the powers of state. While The Court did not explicitly order the government to legislate, it could nevertheless be argued, based on the Waterpakt case, that The Court should have refrained from issuing something other than merely a declaratory judgment.

A6  On 1 September 2015, the Dutch government announced that it would file an appeal regarding the way in which The Court defined the duty of care of the state in respect of its citizens. It also announced that it would start implementing the instant ruling by reviewing a policy study on the effectiveness of CO2 reduction measures.

Date of Analysis: 29 January 2016
Analysis by: Miriam Quené

Instruments cited in the full text of this decision:

Cases cited in the full text of this decision:

To access full citation information for this document, see the Oxford Law Citator record

Decision - full text

The proceedings

1.1.  The course of the proceedings is evidence by:

  • —  the summons, with Exhibits 1–51,

  • —  the defence, with Exhibits 1–15,

  • —  the reply and also change of claim, with Exhibits 52–98,

  • —  the rejoinder, with Exhibits 16–29,

  • —  the document containing Exhibits 99–103 on the part of Urgenda,

  • —  the report of the hearing of 14 April 2015, with the documents stated therein,

  • —  the letters of 30 April and 11 May 2015 of mr. Brans and of 6 and 12 May 2015 of mr. Cox, with comments on the report,

  • —  the letter of 13 May 2015 of the court registry to the Parties.

1.2.  The court will read the report of the hearing of 14 April 2015 with due observance of the comment of the State in its letter of 30 April 2015 and of the comments of Urgenda in its letter of 6 May 2015 regarding an attribution. In Urgenda’s other comments the court sees insufficient reason to amend the report, also in light of the State’s response to the comments. However, it should be noted that the report is only an abridged version of that which was discussed at the hearing or of the conclusions drawn by the court from that which was discussed at the hearing.

1.3.  Finally, judgment was scheduled for today.

The facts

A.  Parties

2.1.  Urgenda (a contraction of “urgent agenda”) arose from the Dutch Research Institute for Transitions (Drift) at Erasmus University Rotterdam, an institute for the transition to a sustainable society. Urgenda is a citizens’ platform with members from various domains in society, such as the business community, media communication, knowledge institutes, government and non-governmental organisations. The platform is involved in the development of plans and measures to prevent climate change.

2.2.  Urgenda was established by a notarial deed of 17 January 2008. Article 2 of the by-laws (“purpose and principle”) reads as follows:

  1. 1.  The purpose of the Foundation is to stimulate and accelerate the transition processes to a more sustainable society, beginning in the Netherlands.

  2. 2.  The Foundations aims to meet this objective by, among other things:

    1. a.  establishing a sustainability platform which will develop a vision for a sustainable Netherlands in the year two thousand and fifty (2050), as a motivating perspective for all parties involved in sustainability;

    2. b.  identifying organisations and initiatives which are involved in sustainability and connecting them to form a sustainability movement;

    3. c.  drawing up an action plan for the next fifty (50) years and implementing it with partners from society;

    4. d.  initiating, stimulating and assisting Icon projects and regional sustainability projects which subscribe to Urgenda’s objectives and which serve as a means of communication in order to show third parties what sustainability means in actual practice.”

2.3.  Regarding the meaning of the term “sustainability”, in its by-laws Urgenda refers to the definition of sustainable development in the 1987 report of the World Commission on Environment and Development of the United Nations (UN), also known as the Brundtland Report, which reads as follows:

“Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

2.4.  In these proceedings, Urgenda also acts on behalf of 886 individuals who have authorised Urgenda to also conduct these proceedings on their behalf.

2.5.  The Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, as a part of the State, is responsible (among other things) for ensuring a healthy and safe living environment, managing scarce resources and environmental compartments, and promoting the development of the Netherlands as a safe, liveable, accessible and competitive delta.

B.  Reasons for these proceedings

2.6.  In its letter to the Prime Minister dated 12 November 2012, Urgenda requested the State to commit and undertake to reduce CO2 emissions in the Netherlands by 40% by 2020, as compared to the emissions in 1990.

2.7.  In her letter dated 11 December 2012, the State Secretary for Infrastructure and the Environment replied to Urgenda’s letter as follows (among other things):

“I share your concerns over the absence of sufficient international action as well as your concerns that both the scale of the problem and the urgency of a successful approach in the public debate are insufficiently tangible (…).

The most important thing is to eventually have a stable and widely supported policy framework which will lead to sufficient action to keep the longterm perspective of a 80%–95% CO2 reduction by 2050 within reach (…)

It is also clear that collective, global actions are required to keep climate change within acceptable limits. In this context of collective actions, the 25%–40% reduction you refer to in your letter was always the objective. The EU’s offer to pursue a 30% reduction by 2020, on the condition that other countries pursue similar reductions, falls within that range. It is a major problem that the current collective, global efforts are falling short and fail to monitor the limitation of the average global temperature rise to 2 degrees. I will cooperate with national and international partners to launch and support initiatives to tackle this (…).

C.  Scientific organisations and publications

IPCC

2.8.  The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a scientific body established by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988, under the auspices of the UN. The IPCC aims to acquire insight into all aspects of climate change, such as the risks, consequences and options for adaptation and mitigation. Mitigation (reducing the problem) is intended to prevent or limit further climate change. Adaptation (adapting to the consequences) is aimed at attempting to make nature, society and the economy less vulnerable to a changing climate. The IPCC itself does not conduct research nor does it keep climaterelated data, but studies and assesses the latest scientific, technical and socioeconomic information produced worldwide and publishes reports about it.

2.9.  The IPCC is not just a scientific body, but also an intergovernmental organisation. Membership is open to all states which are members of the UN and the WMO. The IPCC currently has 195 countries as members, including the Netherlands.

2.10.  Upon its establishment, the IPCC was divided into three working groups, which are responsible for identifying and listing the following subjects:

  • Working group I: existing scientific knowledge about the climate system and climate change;

  • Working group II: the consequences of climate change for the environment, economy and society;

  • Working group III: the possible strategies in response to these changes.

2.11.  Since its inception, the IPCC has published five reports (each consisting of four subreports). The most recent reports are relevant for these proceedings: the “Fourth Assessment Report” from 2007 (hereinafter: AR4/2007) and the “Fifth Assessment Report” from 2013/2014 (hereinafter: AR5/2013).

AR4/2007

2.12.  In this report, the IPCC — in so far as currently still relevant — established that a global temperature rise of 2°C above the preindustrial level (up to the year 1850) creates the risk of dangerous, irreversible change of climate:2

“Confidence has increased that a 1 to 2 oC increase in global mean temperature above 1990 levels (about 1.5 to 2.5o C above pre-industrial) poses significant risks to many unique and threatened systems including many biodiversity hotspots.”

2.13.  In this report, the IPCC provided insight into options for not exceeding the 2°C limit based on the table below.3 To this end, the IPCC provided an overview of the link between the various emission scenarios, stabilisation targets and temperature change, while taking account of a climate sensitivity of probably ( >66%) 2–4.5°C. “Climate sensitivity” represents the extent to which temperature is expected to respond to a doubling of the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. The report proceeds to make calculations with a “best estimate” climate sensitivity of 3°C.

Table 3.10:  Properties of emissions pathways for alternative ranges of C02 and C02-eq stabilization targets. Post-TAR stabilization scenarios in the scenario database (see also Sections 3.2 and 3.3); data source: after Nakicenovic et al., 2006 and Hanaoka et al., 2006)

Class

Anthropogenic addition to radiative forcing at stabilization (Wim2)

Multi-gas concentration level (ppmv C02-eq)

Stabilization level for C02 only, consistent with multi-gas level (ppmv C02)

Number of scenario studies

Global mean temperature C increase above pre-industrial at equilibrium, using best estimate of climate sensitivity c)

Likely range of global mean temperature C increase above pre-industrial at equilibrium a)

Peaking year for C02 emissions b)

Change in global emissions in 2050 (% of 2000 Class emissions) b)

2.5–3.0

445–490

350–400

6

2.0–2.4

1.4–3.6

2000-

-85 to -50

II

3.0–3.5

490–535

400–440

18

2.4–2.8

1.6–4.2

2015

-60 to -30

III

3.5–4.0

535–590

440–485

21

2.8–3.2

1.9–4.9

2000-

-30 to +5

IV

4.0–5.0

590–710

485–570

118

3.2–4.0

2.2–6.1

2020

+10 to

V

5.0–6.0

710–855

570–660

9

4.0–4.9

2.7–7.3

2010-

+60

VI

6.0–7.5

855–1130

660–790

5

4.9–6.1

3.2–8.5

2030

+25 to

2020-

+85

2060

+90 to

2050-

+140

2080

2060-

2090

Notes:

a.  Warming for each stabilization class is calculated based on the variation of climate sensitivity between 2°C –4.5°C, which corresponds to the likely range of climate sensitivity as defined by Meehl et al. (2007,Chapter 10).

b.  Ranges correspond to the 70% percentile of the post-TAR scenario distribution.

c.  ‘Best estimate’ refers to the most likely value of climate sensitivity, i.e. the mode (sea Meehl et al. (2007, Chapter 10) and Table 3.9”

2.14.  This table (after I) shows that in order to limit the temperature rise to 2–2.4° C, the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will have to be stabilised at a level of 445–490 ppmv (parts per million by volume) CO2-eq (CO2 and other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. This unit, which hereinafter is referred to with the abbreviation “ppm”, designates the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The report states that, assuming a climate sensitivity of 3°C, a temperature rise of 2°C maximum can only be achieved when the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is stabilised at about 450 ppm:4

“This ‘best estimate’ assumption shows that the most stringent (category I) scenarios could limit global mean temperature increases to 2°C–2.4°C above pre-industrial levels, at equilibrium, requiring emissions to peak within 10 years. Similarly, limiting temperature increases to 2°C above preindustrial levels can only be reached at the lowest end of the concentration interval found in the scenarios of category I (i.e. about 450 ppmv CO2eq using ‘best estimate’ assumptions). By comparison, using the same ‘best estimate’ assumptions, category II scenarios could limit the increase to 2.8°C–3.2°C above pre-industrial levels at equilibrium, requiring emissions to peak within the next 25 years, whilst category IV scenarios could limit the increase to 3.2°C–4°C above preindustrial at equilibrium requiring emissions to peak within the next 55 years. Note that Table 3.10 category IV scenarios could result in temperature increases as high as 6.1°C above pre-industrial levels, when the likely range for the value of climate sensitivity is taken into account.”

2.15.  Following an analysis of the various scenarios about the question which emission reductions are needed to achieve certain particular climate goals, the IPCC concluded that in order to reach a maximum of 450 ppm, the total emission of greenhouse gases by the Annex I countries (including the Netherlands, as explained below) must be lower than in 1990. In this scenario, the total emission of these countries will have to have been reduced by 80 to 95% compared to 1990. See the table below.5

Box 13.7  The range of the difference between emissions in 1990 and emission allowances in 2020/2050 for various GHG [Greenhouse Gasses; added by the court] concentration levels for Annex I and non-Annex I countries as a groupa

Scenario category

Region

2020

2050

A-450 ppm CO2-eqb

Annex I

-25% to -40%

-80% to -95%

Non-Annex I

Substantial deviation from baseline in Latin America, Middle East, East Asia and Centrally-Planned Asia

Substantial deviation from baseline in all regions

B-550 ppm CO2-eq

Annex I

-10% to -30%

-40% to -90%

Non-Annex I

Deviation from baseline in Latin America and Middle East, East Asia

Deviation from baseline in most regions, especially in Latin America and Middle East

C-650 ppm CO2-eq

Annex I

0% to -25%

-30% to -80%

Non-Annex I

Baseline

Deviation from baseline in Latin America and Middle East, East Asia

Notes:

The aggregate range is based on multiple approaches to apportion emissions between regions (contraction and convergence, multistage, Triptych and intensity targets, among others). Each approach makes different assumptions about the pathway, specific national efforts and other variables. Additional extreme cases — in which Annex I undertakes all reductions, or nonAnnex I undertakes all reductions — are not included. The ranges presented here do not imply political feasibility, nor do the results reflect cost variances.

Only the studies aiming at stabilization at 450 ppm CO2eq assume a (temporary) overshoot of about 50 ppm (See Den Elzen and Meinshausen, 2006). (…)”

2.16.  A table comparable to the one in 2.13 has been included in the Technical Summary of the contribution of Working Group III to AR4/2007 (p. 39), in which the following is stated (p. 90):

“Under most equity interpretations, developed countries as a group would need to reduce their emissions significantly by 2020 (10–40% below 1990 levels) and to still lower levels by 2050 (40–95% below 1990 levels) for low to medium stabilization levels (450–550ppm CO2-eq) (see also Chapter 3).”

The Bali Action Plan, which is discussed below, refers to these sections and to the table in 2.15.

2.17.  The IPCC report also states that mitigation is generally better than adaptation:6

“Over the next 20 years or so, even the most aggressive climate policy can do little to avoid warming already ‘loaded’ into the climate system. The benefits of avoided climate change will only accrue beyond that time. Over longer time frames, beyond the next few decades, mitigation investments have a greater potential to avoid climate change damage and this potential is larger than the adaptation options that can currently be envisaged (medium agreement, medium evidence).”

AR5/2013

2.18.  In 2013–2014, the IPCC published its latest insights into the scope, effects and causes of climate change. In the report concerned (AR5/2013) the IPCC, in accordance with AR4/2007, established that the earth has been warming as a result of the high increase of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere since the Industrial Revolution (base year 1850) and that this has been caused by human activity, particularly the combustion of oil, natural gas and coal as well as deforestation:7

“Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and since the 1950’s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millenia. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, sea level has risen, and the concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased (…)

Each of the last three decades has been successively warmer at the Earth’s surface than any preceding decade since 1850 (…). In the Northern Hemisphere, 1983–2012 was likely the warmest 30-year period of the last 1400 years (medium confidence).

The globally averaged combined land and ocean surface temperature data as calculated by a linear trend, show a warming of 0.85 [0.65 to 1.06]°C, over the period 1880 to 2012, when multiple independently produced datasets exist. The total increase between the average of the 1850–1900 period and the 2003–2012 period is 0.78 [0.72 to 0.85]°C, based on the single longest dataset available (…).

Human influence has been detected in warming of the atmosphere and the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, in global mean sea level rise, and in changes in some climate extremes (…). This evidence for human influence has grown since AR4. It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century.”

2.19.  In the report, the IPCC also concluded that if concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will have stabilised to about 450 ppm in 2100, there is a 66% chance that the rise of the global temperature will not exceed 2°C. In order to achieve a concentration level of 450 ppm in 2100, the global greenhouse emissions in 2050 will have to be 40 to 70% lower than those in the year 2010. The total of emissions will have to have been reduced to zero or even to below zero (as compared to the comparative year) by 2100:8

“Mitigation scenarios in which it is likely that the temperature change caused by anthropogenic GHG emissions can be kept to less than 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels are characterized by atmospheric concentrations in 2100 of about 450 ppm CO2eq (high confidence). Mitigation scenarios reaching concentration levels of about 500 ppm CO2eq by 2100 are more likely than not to limit temperature change to less than 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels, unless they temporarily ‘overshoot’ concentration levels of roughly 530 ppm CO2eq before 2100, in which case they are about as likely as not to achieve that goal. Scenarios that reach 530 to 650 ppm CO2eq concentrations by 2100 are more unlikely than likely to keep temperature change below 2°C relative to preindustrial levels. Scenarios that exceed about 650 ppm CO2eq by 2100 are unlikely to limit temperature change to below 2°C relative to preindustrial levels. Mitigation scenarios in which temperature increase is more likely than not to be less than 1.5°C relative to preindustrial levels by 2100 are characterized by concentrations in 2100 of below 430 ppm CO2eq. Temperature peaks during the century and then declines in these scenarios. (…)

Scenarios reaching atmospheric concentration levels of about 450 ppm CO2eq by 2100 (consistent with a likely chance to keep temperature change below 2°C relative to pre-industrial levels) include substantial cuts in anthropogenic GHG emissions by midcentury through large-scale changes in energy systems and potentially land use (high confidence). Scenarios reaching these concentrations by 2100 are characterized by lower global GHG emissions in 2050 than in 2010, 40% to 70% lower globally, and emissions levels near zero GtCO2eq or below in 2100. In scenarios reaching 500 ppm CO2eq by 2100, 2050 emissions levels are 25% to 55% lower than in 2010 globally. In scenarios reaching 550 ppm CO2eq, emissions in 2050 are from 5% above 2010 levels to 45% below 2010 levels globally (…). At the global level, scenarios reaching 450 ppm CO2eq are also characterized by more rapid improvements of energy efficiency, a tripling to nearly a quadrupling of the share of zero- and low-carbon energy supply from renewables, nuclear energy and fossil energy with carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), or bioenergy with CCS (BECCS) by the year 2050 (…). These scenarios describe a wide range of changes in land use, reflecting different assumptions about the scale of bioenergy production, afforestation, and reduced deforestation. All of these emissions, energy, and land-use changes vary across regions. Scenarios reaching higher concentrations include similar changes, but on a slower timescale. On the other hand, scenarios reaching lower concentrations require these changes on a faster timescale. […]

Mitigation scenarios reaching about 450 ppm CO2eq in 2100 typically involve temporary overshoot of atmospheric concentrations, as do many scenarios reaching about 500 ppm to 550 ppm CO2eq in 2100. Depending on the level of the overshoot, overshoot scenarios typically rely on the availability and widespread deployment of BECCS and afforestation in the second half of the century. The availability and scale of these and other Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) technologies and methods are uncertain and CDR technologies and methods are, to varying degrees, associated with challenges and risks (high confidence) (…). CDR is also prevalent in many scenarios without overshoot to compensate for residual emissions from sectors where mitigation is more expensive. There is only limited evidence on the potential for large-scale deployment of BECCS, large-scale afforestation, and other CDR technologies and methods.

Estimated global GHG emissions levels in 2020 based on the Cancún Pledges are not consistent with cost effective long-term mitigation trajectories that are at least as likely as not to limit temperature change to 2°C relative to preindustrial levels (2100 concentrations of about 450 and about 500 ppm CO2eq), but they do not preclude the option to meet that goal (high confidence). Meeting this goal would require further substantial reductions beyond 2020. The Cancún Pledges are broadly consistent with cost-effective scenarios that are likely to keep temperature change below 3°C relative to preindustrial levels. […]

Delaying mitigation efforts beyond those in place today through 2030 is estimated to substantially increase the difficulty of the transition to low longer-term emissions levels and narrow the range of options consistent with maintaining temperature change below 2°C relative to pre-industrial levels (high confidence). Cost-effective mitigation scenarios that make it at least as likely as not that temperature change will remain below 2°C relative to pre-industrial levels (2100 concentrations between about 450 and 500 ppm CO2eq) are typically characterized by annual GHG emissions in 2030 of roughly between 30 GtCO2eq and 50 GtCO2eq (Figure SPM.5, left panel). Scenarios with annual GHG emissions above 55 GtCO2eq in 2030 are characterized by substantially higher rates of emissions reductions from 2030 to 2050 (…); much more rapid scaleup of lowcarbon energy over this period (…); a larger reliance on CDR technologies in the long-term (…); and higher transitional and longterm economic impacts (…). Due to these increased mitigation challenges, many models with annual 2030 GHG emissions higher than 55 GtCO2eq could not produce scenarios reaching atmospheric concentration levels that make it as likely as not that temperature change will remain below 2°C relative to preindustrial levels.”

2.20.  The following has been observed about the scope of the emissions:9

“Total anthropogenic GHG emissions have continued to increase over 1970 to 2010 with larger absolute decadal increases toward the end of this period (high confidence). Despite a growing number of climate change mitigation policies, annual GHG emissions grew on average by 1.0 gigatonne carbon dioxide equivalent (GtCO2eq) (2.2%) per year from 2000 to 2010 compared to 0.4 GtCO2eq (1.3%) per year from 1970 to 2000 (…). Total anthropogenic GHG emissions were the highest in human history from 2000 to 2010 and reached 49 (±4.5) GtCO2eq/yr in 2010. The global economic crisis 2007/2008 only temporarily reduced emissions.”

2.21.  The IPCC expects that temperatures on earth will have increased by 3.7 to 4.8°C by 2100 and that the 450 ppm level will have been exceeded in 2030 if reduction measures fail to materialise:10

“Without additional efforts to reduce GHG emissions beyond those in place today, emissions growth is expected to persist driven by growth in global population and economic activities. Baseline scenarios, those without additional mitigation, result in global mean surface temperature increases in 2100 from 3.7°C to 4.8°C compared to pre-industrial levels10 (median values; the range is 2.5°C to 7.8°C when including climate uncertainty (…) (high confidence). The emission scenarios collected for this assessment represent full radiative forcing including GHGs, tropospheric ozone, aerosols and albedo change. Baseline scenarios (scenarios without explicit additional efforts to constrain emissions) exceed 450 parts per million (ppm) CO2eq by 2030 and reach CO2eq concentration levels between 750 and more than 1300 ppm CO2eq by 2100. This is similar to the range in atmospheric concentration levels between the RCP 6.0 and RCP 8.5 pathways in 2100. For comparison, the CO2eq concentration in 2011 is estimated to be 430 ppm (uncertainty range 340 – 520 ppm).”

PBL and KNMI

2.22.  The Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) is a national independent research institute working in the field of the environment, nature and spatial planning. It conducts research, both when asked and on its own initiative, in support of political and administrative policies. Established in 2008, the institute currently forms part of the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment.

2.23.  The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) is the Dutch national institute for meteorology and seismology established by law. The institute provides the best information available in the field of weather, climate and earthquakes in support of the security, accessibility, liveability and prosperity of the Netherlands. The KNMI represents the Netherlands in the IPCC and other bodies.

2.24.  Both the PBL and the KNMI analyse results of the IPCC reports and report about the consequences of the IPCC findings for the Netherlands.

EDGAR

2.25.  The Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) is a database in which a country’s emission data are collected based on which the global emission of greenhouse gases can be determined. EDGAR is a joint project of the European Commission and the PBL.

2.26.  According to the latest data from EDGAR the following amounts of greenhouse gases have been emitted worldwide and in the Netherlands:

Worldwide

1990 38232170.06 megatons (hereinafter: Mt) CO2-eq.

2010 50911113.68 Mt CO2-eq

2012 53526302.83 Mt CO2-eq

The Netherlands

1990 224468.09 Mt CO2-eq

2010 212418.45 Mt CO2-eq

2012 19587376 Mt CO2-eq

2.27.  In 2010, the Dutch share in the global emissions was 0.42%; the Chinese share in that year was 21.97%; the share of the United States was 13.19%; the total share of the European Union (then 27 countries) was 9.5%; the Brazilian share was 5.7%; India’s share was 5.44% and Russia’s share was 5.11%.

2.28.  Per capita emissions in the Netherlands in 2010 were 12.78 tons CO2-eq. and in 2012 11.72 tons CO2-eq. In China, per capita emissions in 2012 were 9.04 tons CO2-eq. ; in the United States 19.98 tons CO2-eq. ; in Brazil 15.05 tons CO2-eq. ; in India 2.43 tons CO2-eq. and in Russia 19.58 tons CO2-eq.

UNEP

2.29.  The UNEP, referred to in 2.8, has issued annual reports about the “emissions gap” since 2010. The gap is the difference between the desired emissions level in a certain year and the level of emissions anticipated for that year based on the reduction goals pledged by the countries concerned.

2.30.  The “executive summary” of the Emissions Gap Report 2013 includes the following:

“(…) This report confirms and strengthens the conclusions of the three previous analyses that current pledges and commitments fall short of that goal. It further says that, as emissions of greenhouse gases continue to rise rather than decline, it becomes less and less likely that emissions will be low enough by 2020 to be on a least-cost pathway towards meeting the 2°C target.

As a result, after 2020, the world will have to rely on more difficult, costlier and riskier means of meeting the target — the further from the least-cost level in 2020, the higher these costs and the greater the risks will be.

(…)

  1. 2.  What emission levels are anticipated for 2020?

    Global greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 are estimated at 59 GtCO2e per year under a business-as-usual scenario. If implemented fully, pledges and commitments would reduce this by 3–7 GtCO2e per year (…).

  2. 3.  What is the latest estimate of the emissions gap in 2020?

    (…) Least-cost emission pathways consistent with a likely chance of keeping global mean temperature increases below 2°C compared to pre-industrial levels have a median level of 44 GtCO2e in 2020 (range: 38–47 GtCO2e). Assuming full implementation of the pledges, the emissions gap thus amounts to between 8–12 GtCO2e per year in 2020 (…).

  3. 6.  What are the implications of later action scenarios that still meet the 1.5°C and 2°C targets?

    Based on a much larger number of studies than in 2012, this update concludes that so-called later-action scenarios have several implications compared to least cost scenario’s, including: (i) much higher rates of global emission reductions in the medium term; (ii) greater lock-in of carbon-intensive infrastructure; (iii) greater dependence of certain technologies in the medium-term; (iv) greater costs of mitigation in the medium- and long term, and greater risks of economic disruption; and (v) greater risks of failing to meet the 2°C target. For these reasons lateraction scenarios may not be feasible in practise and, as a result, temperature targets could be missed.

    (…) although later-action scenarios might reach the same temperature targets as their least-cost counterparts, later-action scenarios pose greater risks of climate impacts for four reasons. First delaying action allows more greenhouse gases to build-up in the atmosphere in the near term, thereby increasing the risk that later emission reductions will be unable to compensate for this build up. Second, the risk of overshooting climate targets for both atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and global temperature increase is higher with later-action scenarios. Third, the near-term rate of temperature is higher, which implies greater near-term climate impacts. Lastly, when action is delayed, options to achieve stringent levels of climate protection are increasingly lost.”

2.31.  Chapter 2 of the report contains the following section:

  1. 2.4.5  Pledged reduction effort by Annex I and non-Annex I countries

    For Annex I parties, total emissions as a group of countries for the four pledge cases are estimated to be 3–16 percent below 1990 levels in 2020. For non-Annex I parties, total emissions are estimated to be 7–9 percent lower than business-as-usual emissions. This implies that the aggregate Annex I countries’ emission goals fall short of reaching the 25–40 percent reduction by 2020, compared with 1990, suggested in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (…).”

2.32.  In contrast to previous reports, the Emissions Gap Report 2014 mainly focuses on the “carbon dioxide emissions budget”. The UNEP concludes that in order to be able to maintain the target of a maximum global temperature rise of 2°C above the preindustrial level (hereinafter: the 2°C target), the CO2 budget may not exceed 3,670 gigatonne (hereinafter: Gt). According to the UNEP, at the beginning of the nineteenth century this budget totaled about 2,900 Gt CO2, of which about 1,000 Gt remains. In the report, the UNEP investigated — in short —the best way to spend this budget (and thereby: which reductions are required). Attention was also paid to the question, given the 2°C target, at what point the world needs to be CO2-neutral (a net result of anthropogenic positive and negative CO2 emissions of zero). The UNEP has depicted this in the following figure:

Figure ES.1:  Carbon neutrality

2.33.  The “executive summary” of the 2014 report furthermore states the following:

  1. 6.  What about the emissions gap in 2030?

    (…)

    This report estimates that global emissions in 2030 consistent with having a likely chance of staying within the 2 °C target are about 42 Gt CO2e.

    As for expected emissions in 2030, the range of the pledge cases in 2020 (52–54 Gt CO2e) was extrapolated to give median estimates of 56–59 Gt CO2e in 2030.

    The emissions gap in 2030 is therefore estimated to be 14–17 Gt CO2e (56 minus 42 and 59 minus 42). This is equivalent to about a third of current global greenhouse emissions (or 26–32 per cent of 2012 emission levels).

    As a reference point, the gap in 2030 relative to business-as-usual emissions in that year (68 Gt CO2e) is 26 Gt CO2e. The good news is that the potential to reduce global emissions relative to the baseline is estimated to be 29 Gt CO2e, that is, larger than this gap. This means that it is feasible to close the 2030 gap and stay within the 2°C limit.”

D.  Climate change and the development of legal and policy frameworks

2.34.  In light of climate change, agreements have been made and instruments have been developed in an international and European context in order to counter the problems of climate change, which have impacted the national legal and policy frameworks.

In a UN context

UN Framework Convention on Climate Change 1992

2.35.  In 1992, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (hereinafter: the UN Climate Change Convention) was agreed and signed under the responsibility of the UN. The UN Climate Change Convention entered into effect on 21 March 1994. Currently, 195 Member States have ratified the convention, including the Netherlands and (the predecessor of) the European Union (both in 1993).

2.36.  The purpose of the Convention, in brief, is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thereby prevent the undesired consequences of climate change. Among other things, Its opening words state the following:

“Acknowledging that the global nature of climate change calls for the widest possible cooperation by all countries and their participation in an effective and appropriate international response, in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities and their social and economic conditions,

Recalling also that States have, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the principles of international law, the sovereign right to exploit their own resources pursuant to their own environmental and developmental policies, and the responsibility to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other States or of areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction,

Reaffirming the principle of sovereignty of States in international cooperation to address climate change,

Determined to protect the climate system for present and future generations, (…)”

2.37.  Article 2 of the UN Climate Change Convention describes the objective as follows:

The ultimate objective of this Convention and any related legal instruments that the Conference of the Parties may adopt is to achieve, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a level should be achieved within a time-frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.

2.38.  Article 3 of the UN Climate Change Convention contains the following principles, among other things:

  1. 1.  The Parties should protect the climate system for the benefit of present and future generations of humankind, on the basis of equity and in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Accordingly, the developed country Parties should take the lead in combating climate change and the adverse effects thereof.

    (…)

  2. 3.  The Parties should take precautionary measures to anticipate, prevent or minimize the causes of climate change and mitigate its adverse effects. Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing such measures, taking into account that policies and measures to deal with climate change should be costeffective so as to ensure global benefits at the lowest possible cost. To achieve this, such policies and measures should take into account different socioeconomic contexts, be comprehensive, cover all relevant sources, sinks and reservoirs of greenhouse gases and adaptation, and comprise all economic sectors. Efforts to address climate change may be carried out cooperatively by interested Parties.

  3. 4.  The Parties have a right to, and should, promote sustainable development. Policies and measures to protect the climate system against human-induced change should be appropriate for the specific conditions of each Party and should be integrated with national development programmes, taking into account that economic development is essential for adopting measures to address climate change.

2.39.  The signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention constitute two groups of countries: (1) the developed countries, as listed in Annex I to the Convention, also referred to as “Annex I countries”, and (2) the developing countries, or “non-Annex I countries”, being all other countries which have ratified the UN Climate Change Convention. The Netherlands is an Annex I country. Article 4, paragraph 2 of the UN Climate Change Convention stipulates the following in particular regarding the Annex I countries:

The developed country Parties and other Parties included in Annex I commit themselves specifically as provided for in the following:

  1. ( a)  Each of these Parties shall adopt national policies and take corresponding measures on the mitigation of climate change, by limiting its anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and protecting and enhancing its greenhouse gas sinks and reservoirs. These policies and measures will demonstrate that developed countries are taking the lead in modifying longer-term trends in anthropogenic emissions consistent with the objective of the Convention, recognizing that the return by the end of the present decade to earlier levels of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol would contribute to such modification, and taking into account the differences in these Parties' starting points and approaches, economic structures and resource bases, the need to maintain strong and sustainable economic growth, available technologies and other individual circumstances, as well as the need for equitable and appropriate contributions by each of these Parties to the global effort regarding that objective. These Parties may implement such policies and measures jointly with other Parties and may assist other Parties in contributing to the achievement of the objective of the Convention and, in particular, that of this subparagraph;

  2. ( b)  In order to promote progress to this end, each of these Parties shall communicate, within six months of the entry into force of the Convention for it and periodically thereafter, and in accordance with Article 12, detailed information on its policies and measures referred to in subparagraph (a) above, as well as on its resulting projected anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol for the period referred to in subparagraph (a), with the aim of returning individually or jointly to their 1990 levels these anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This information will be reviewed by the Conference of the Parties, at its first session and periodically thereafter, in accordance with Article 7; (…)

2.40.  The article thus means that the Annex I countries, separately or jointly, have assumed the obligation to have reduced the growth of their greenhouse gas emissions to the level of 1990 by the year 2000. All Member States are furthermore obliged to annually report their emissions to the UN Climate Change Convention secretariat. The obligations of all other Parties to the Convention (the “non-Annex I countries”) are less far-reaching and they do not have to introduce emission reductions.

2.41.  Several countries of the group of Annex I countries, including the Netherlands, have furthermore committed to rendering financial assistance to the non-Annex I countries, in accordance with the UN Climate Change Conventions.

Kyoto Protocol 1997 and Doha Amendment 2012

2.42.  The Kyoto Protocol was agreed in 1997 in the context of the UN Climate Change Convention. The Netherlands, but also (the predecessor of) the European Union, which then comprised fifteen countries, including the Netherlands, ratified the Kyoto Protocol. It entered into force on 16 February 2005.

2.43.  In the Protocol, the signatories set as their objective for the period 2008–2012 to reduce the mean annual greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries by 5.2% compared to 1990 (Article 3, paragraph 1 of and Appendix B to the Kyoto Protocol). The reduction percentages differ per country. A reduction target of 8% (Appendix B) was set for the European Union for the same period. The EU proceeded to determine the emission reductions per Member State, after consulting the Member States. An emission reduction of 6% was agreed for the Netherlands.

2.44.  Several countries, including the United States and China, did not ratify the Protocol and Canada withdrew from the Protocol in 2011. Before Canada’s withdrawal, the Protocol covered 14% of global emissions.

2.45.  On 8 December 2012, an Amendment to the Kyoto Protocol was adopted in Doha (Qatar). In the Amendment, various countries and the European Union as a whole as well as its individual Member States agreed on a CO2 emission reduction target for the period 2013–2020. The European Union committed to a 20% reduction target as of 2020, compared to 1990. The European Union offered to commit to a 30% reduction target, on the condition that both the developed and the more advanced developing countries commit to similar emission targets. This condition has not materialised thus far nor has the Doha Amendment entered into force yet.

2.46.  Japan, the Russian Federation and New Zealand did not commit to a particular reduction target for this second period. Therefore, the Kyoto Protocol regulates the CO2 emissions of 37 developed countries, namely the (then) 27 individual EU Member States, Australia, Iceland, Croatia, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Switzerland and Belarus, as well as the EU as an independent organisation.

Climate change conferences (Conference of the Parties — COP)

2.47.  The UN Climate Change Convention has also provided for the establishment of the Conference of the Parties (COP). All Parties hold a seat on the COP and have one vote. Based on the reports submitted by the Member States, the COP makes annual assessments of the status of the achievement of the Convention’s objective and issues reports about it. The COP can issue decisions during these climate conferences, usually based on consensus.

a)  Bali Action Plan 2007

2.48.  The signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention issued various decisions during the climate conference on Bali in 2007, including the Bali Action Plan (Decision 1/CP.13). The preamble to this decision, among others, contains the following sections:

Responding to the findings of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that delay in reducing emissions significantly constrains opportunities to achieve lower stabilization levels and increases the risk of more severe climate change impacts,

Recognizing that deep cuts in global emissions will be required to achieve the ultimate objective of the Convention and emphasizing the urgency1 to address climate change as is indicated in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

b)  The Cancun Agreements 2010

2.49.  At the climate conference in Cancun in 2010, the parties involved issued various decisions, including The Cancun Agreements (Decision 1/CP.16), which contains the following sections, among others:

“Recalling its decision 1/CP.13 (the Bali Action Plan) and decision 1/CP.15 (…),

Noting resolution 10/4 of the United Nations Human Rights Council on human rights and climate change, which recognizes that the adverse effects of climate change have a range of direct and indirect implications for the effective enjoyment of human rights and that the effects of climate change will be felt most acutely by those segments of the population that are already vulnerable owing to geography, gender, age, indigenous or minority status, or disability (…),

  1. 4.  Further recognizes that deep cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions are required according to science, and as documented in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Inter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, with a view to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions so as to hold the increase in global average temperature below 2°C above preindustrial levels, and that Parties should take urgent action to meet this longterm goal, consistent with science and on the basis of equity; also recognizes the need to consider, in the context of the first review, as referred to in paragraph 138 below, strengthening the longterm global goal on the basis of the best available scientific knowledge, including in relation to a global average temperature rise of 1.5°C; (…)”

2.50.  At the Cancun climate conference in 2010, the Annex I countries also took the decision which contains the following section, among others:11

“Decision 1/CMP.6 The Cancun Agreements: Outcome of the work of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Further Commitments for Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol at its fifteenth session

(…)

Recognizing that Parties included in Annex I (Annex I Parties) should continue to take the lead in combating climate change,

Also recognizing that the contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, indicates that achieving the lowest levels assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to date and its corresponding potential damage limitation would require Annex I Parties as a group to reduce emissions in a range of 25–40 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020, through means that may be available to these Parties to reach their emission reduction targets, (…)

  1. 4.  Urges Annex I Parties to raise the level of ambition of the emission reductions to be achieved by them individually or jointly, with a view to reducing their aggregate level of emissions of greenhouse gases in accordance with the range indicated by Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, and taking into account the quantitative implications of the use of land use, land-use change and forestry activities, emissions trading and project-based mechanisms and the carry-over of units from the first to the second commitment period; (…)”

Durban 2011

2.51.  The parties at the climate conference in Durban in 2011 issued several decisions. Decision 1/CP.17 states the following, among other things:

Recognizing that climate change represents an urgent and potentially irreversible threat to human societies and the planet and thus requires to be urgently addressed by all Parties (…),

Noting with grave concern the significant gap between the aggregate effect of Parties’ mitigation pledges in terms of global annual emissions of greenhouse gases by 2020 and aggregate emission pathways consistent with having a likely chance of holding the increase in global average temperature below 2°C or 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, (…)”

2.52.  At the Durban conference, the Parties also agreed that a new legally binding climate change convention or protocol must be concluded no later than 2015 and must be implemented by 2020. The climate conference which will be held in Paris in December 2015 is a follow-up to this agreement.

In a European context

2.53.  Article 191 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) currently reads as follows:

Article 191 

  1. 1.  Union policy on the environment shall contribute to pursuit of the following objectives:

    • —  preserving, protecting and improving the quality of the environment;

    • —  protecting human health;

    • —  prudent and rational utilisation of natural resources;

    • —  promoting measures at international level to deal with regional or worldwide environmental problems, and in particular combating climate change.

  2. 2.  Union policy on the environment shall aim at a high level of protection taking into account the diversity of situations in the various regions of the Union. It shall be based on the precautionary principle and on the principles that preventive action should be taken, that environmental damage should as a priority be rectified at source and that the polluter should pay.

    In this context, harmonisation measures answering environmental protection requirements shall include, where appropriate, a safeguard clause allowing Member States to take provisional measures, for non-economic environmental reasons, subject to a procedure of inspection by the Union.

  3. 3.  In preparing its policy on the environment, the Union shall take account of:

    • —  available scientific and technical data,

    • —  environmental conditions in the various regions of the Union,

    • —  the potential benefits and costs of action or lack of action,

    • —  the economic and social development of the Union as a whole and the balanced development of its regions.

  4. 4.  Within their respective spheres of competence, the Union and the Member States shall cooperate with third countries and with the competent international organisations. The arrangements for Union cooperation may be the subject of agreements between the Union and the third parties concerned. The previous subparagraph shall be without prejudice to Member States' competence to negotiate in international bodies and to conclude international agreements.

2.54.  Under Article 192 TFEU, the European Parliament and the Council, acting in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure (meaning on the proposal of the Commission) and after consulting the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) and the Committee of the Regions, generally decide what action is to be taken by the Union in order to achieve the objectives referred to in Article 191 (apart from exception formulated the paragraph 2).

2.55.  Article 193 TFEU currently reads as follows:

Article 193 

The protective measures adopted pursuant to Article 192 shall not prevent any Member State from maintaining or introducing more stringent protective measures. Such measures must be compatible with the Treaties. They shall be notified to the Commission.

2.56.  Partly as a follow-up to the Kyoto Protocol, the EU formulated its environmental objectives and priorities in Decision no 1600/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down the Sixth Community Environment Action Programme as follows:

Article 2  Principles and overall aims (…)

  1. 2.  The Programme aims at:

    • —  emphasising climate change as an outstanding challenge of the next 10 years and beyond and contributing to the long term objective of stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Thus a long term objective of a maximum global temperature increase of 2 °Celsius over preindustrial levels and a CO2 concentration below 550 ppm shall guide the Programme. In the longer term this is likely to require a global reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases by 70% as compared to 1990 as identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); (… )”

2.57.  The European Union subsequently converted its objectives in European regulations, including by introducing a large number of directives, among them Directive 2003/87/EC establishing a scheme for greenhouse gas emission allowance trading within the Community, which introduced the European Union Emission Trading System (ETS). This system only applies to major energy-intensive businesses, such as major electricity generation plants and refineries (hereinafter also referred to as: the ETS businesses). Non-ETS sectors, including transport, agriculture, housing and small companies, do not fall under the scope of the ETS.

2.58.  The preamble to Directive 2009/29/EC amending Directive 2003/87/EC so as to improve and extend the greenhouse gas emission allowance trading scheme of the Community states the following:

  1. (6)  In order to enhance the certainty and predictability of the Community scheme, provisions should be specified to increase the level of contribution of the Community scheme to achieving an overall reduction of more than 20%, in particular in view of the European Council’s objective of a 30% reduction by 2020 which is considered scientifically necessary to avoid dangerous climate change (…).

  2. (13)  The Community-wide quantity of allowances should decrease in a linear manner calculated from the mid-point of the period from 2008 to 2012, ensuring that the emissions trading system delivers gradual and predictable reductions of emissions over time. The annual decrease of allowances should be equal to 1.74% of the allowances issued by Member States pursuant to Commission Decisions on Member States’ national allocation plans for the period from 2008 to 2012, so that the Community scheme contributes cost-effectively to achieving the commitment of the Community to an overall reduction in emissions of at least 20% by 2020.

  3. (14)  This contribution is equivalent to a reduction of emissions in 2020 in the Community scheme of 21% below reported 2005 levels, (…).”

2.59.  Articles 1 and 9 of the ETS Directive read as follows — following amendment:

Article 1  Subject matter

This Directive establishes a scheme for greenhouse gas emission allowance trading within the Community (hereinafter referred to as the ‘Community scheme’) in order to promote reductions of greenhouse gas emissions in a costeffective and economically efficient manner.

This Directive also provides for the reductions of greenhouse gas emissions to be increased so as to contribute to the levels of reductions that are considered scientifically necessary to avoid dangerous climate change.

This Directive also lays down provisions for assessing and implementing a stricter Community reduction commitment exceeding 20%, to be applied upon the approval by the Community of an international agreement on climate change leading to greenhouse gas emission reductions exceeding those required in Article 9, as reflected in the 30% commitment endorsed by the European Council of March 2007.

Article 9  Communitywide quantity of allowances

The Community-wide quantity of allowances issued each year starting in 2013 shall decrease in a linear manner beginning from the mid-point of the period from 2008 to 2012. The quantity shall decrease by a linear factor of 1.74% compared to the average annual total quantity of allowances issued by Member States in accordance with the Commission Decisions on their national allocation plans for the period from 2008 to 2012.

The Commission shall, by 30 June 2010, publish the absolute Community-wide quantity of allowances for 2013, based on the total quantities of allowances issued or to be issued by the Member States in accordance with the Commission Decisions on their national allocation plans for the period from 2008 to 2012.

The Commission shall review the linear factor and submit a proposal, where appropriate, to the European Parliament and to the Council as from 2020, with a view to the adoption of a decision by 2025.”

2.60.  The Communication of the European Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the EESC and the CoR of 10 January 2007, entitled “Limiting Global Climate Change to 2 degrees Celsius. The way ahead for 2020 and beyond”, states the following, among other things:12

  1. 2.  THE CLIMATE CHALLENGE: REACHING THE 2°C OBJECTIVE

    Strong scientific evidence shows that urgent action to tackle climate change is imperative. Recent studies, such as the Stern review, reaffirm the enormous costs of failure to act. These costs are economic, but also social and environmental and will especially fall on the poor, in both developing and developed countries. A failure to act will have serious local and global security implications. Most solutions are readily available, but governments must now adopt policies to implement them. Not only is the economic cost of doing so manageable, tackling climate change also brings considerable benefits in other respects. The EU's objective is to limit global average temperature increase to less than 2°C compared to pre-industrial levels. This will limit the impacts of climate change and the likelihood of massive and irreversible disruptions of the global ecosystem. The Council has noted that this will require atmospheric concentrations of GHG to remain well below 550 ppmv CO2-eq. By stabilising long-term concentrations at around 450 ppmv CO2-eq. there is a 50% chance of doing so. This will require global GHG emissions to peak before 2025 and then fall by up to 50% by 2050 compared to 1990 levels. The Council has agreed that developed countries will have to continue to take the lead to reduce their emissions between 15 to 30% by 2020. The European Parliament has proposed an EU CO2 reduction target of 30% for 2020 and 60 to 80% for 2050.”

2.61.  In July 2008, the EESC issued its Opinion on the “Proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2003/87/EC so as to improve and extend the greenhouse gas emission allowance trading system of the Community”. This proposal pertains the following, among other things:13

  1. 6.5  The EESC has therefore paid particular attention to the role of the ETS in delivering equitable and sustainable impact on global GHG reduction. Does it demonstrate that European action is both credible and effective? In this context it has to be stated that the EU target of a 20% reduction in GHG emissions by 2020 compared to 1990 levels (which underlies the ETS and the burden sharing proposals) is lower than the 25–40% reduction range for industrialised nations which was supported by the EU at the Bali Climate Change Conference in December 2007. The Commission starts from the targets as agreed in the European Spring Council 2007 leaving undiscussed whether this level of reduction is really sufficient to achieve global objectives or whether it is just the maximum reduction that may conceivably be accepted, given the balance of short-term political and economically motivated interests of Member States. The EESC concludes that accumulating evidence on climate change demands the re-setting of targets to achieve greater GHG emission reductions.”

2.62.  In Decision No 406/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the effort of Member States to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to meet the Community’s greenhouse gas emission reduction commitments up to 2020 (the “Effort Sharing Decision”), the following was considered and adopted to regulate emissions in the nonETS sectors:

  1. (2)  The view of the Community, most recently expressed, in particular, by the European Council of March 2007, is that in order to meet this objective, the overall global annual mean surface temperature increase should not exceed 2°C above pre-industrial levels, which implies that global greenhouse gas emissions should be reduced to at least 50% below 1990 levels by 2050. The Community’s greenhouse gas emissions covered by this Decision should continue to decrease beyond 2020 as part of the Community’s efforts to contribute to this global emissions reduction goal. Developed countries, including the EU Member States, should continue to take the lead by committing to collectively reducing their emissions of greenhouse gases in the order of 30% by 2020 compared to 1990. They should do so also with a view to collectively reducing their greenhouse gas emissions by 60 to 80% by 2050 compared to 1990. (…)

  2. (3)  Furthermore, in order to meet this objective, the European Council of March 2007 endorsed a Community objective of a 30% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 1990 as its contribution to a global and comprehensive agreement for the period after 2012, provided that other developed countries commit themselves to comparable emission reductions and economically more advanced developing countries commit themselves to contributing adequately according to their responsibilities and capabilities.

  3. (4)  The European Council of March 2007 emphasised that the Community is committed to transforming Europe into a highly energy-efficient and low greenhouse-gas-emitting economy and has decided that, until a global and comprehensive agreement for the period after 2012 is concluded, and without prejudice to its position in international negotiations, the Community makes a firm independent commitment to achieve at least a 20% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 1990 (…).

  4. (6)  Directive 2003/87/EC(1) establishes a scheme for greenhouse gas emission allowance trading within the Community, which covers certain sectors of the economy. All sectors of the economy should contribute to emission reductions in order to cost-effectively achieve the objective of a 20% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 1990 levels. Member States should therefore implement additional policies and measures in an effort to further limit the greenhouse gas emissions from sources not covered under Directive 2003/87/EC.

  5. (7)  The effort of each Member State should be determined in relation to the level of its 2005 greenhouse gas emissions covered by this Decision, adjusted to exclude the emissions from installations that existed in 2005 but which were brought into the Community scheme in the period from 2006 to 2012. Annual emission allocations for the period from 2013 to 2020 in terms of tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent should be determined on the basis of reviewed and verified data.

  6. (9)  To further ensure a fair distribution between the Member States of the efforts to contribute to the implementation of the independent reduction commitment of the Community, no Member State should be required to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 to more than 20% below 2005 levels nor allowed to increase its greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 to more than 20% above 2005 levels. Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions should take place between 2013 and 2020. Each Member State should be allowed to carry forward from the following year a quantity of up to 5% of its annual emission allocation. Where the emissions of a Member State are below that annual emission allocation, a Member State should be allowed to carry over its excess emission reductions to the subsequent years (…).

  7. (17)  (17) This Decision should be without prejudice to more stringent national objectives. Where Member States limit the greenhouse gas emissions covered by this Decision beyond their obligations under this Decision in order to meet a more stringent objective, the limitation imposed by this Decision on the use of greenhouse gas emission reduction credits should not apply to the additional emission reductions to attain the national objective. (…)

Article 1  Subject matter

This Decision lays down the minimum contribution of Member States to meeting the greenhouse gas emission reduction commitment of the Community for the period from 2013 to 2020 for greenhouse gas emissions covered by this Decision, and rules on making these contributions and for the evaluation thereof.

This Decision also lays down provisions for assessing and implementing a stricter Community reduction commitment exceeding 20%, to be applied upon the approval by the Community of an international agreement on climate change leading to emissions reductions exceeding those required pursuant to Article 3, as reflected in the 30% reduction commitment as endorsed by the European Council of March 2007 (…).

Article 3  Emission levels for the period from 2013 to 2020.

  1. 1.  Each Member State shall, by 2020, limit its greenhouse gas emissions at least by the percentage set for that Member State in Annex II to this Decision in relation to its emissions in 2005. (…)

Annex II 

(…)”

Member State greenhouse gas emission limits in 2020 compared to 2005 greenhouse gas emissions levels

(…)

Netherlands

16%

2.63.  In the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the regions, entitled “Analysis of options to move beyond 20% greenhouse gas emission reductions and assessing the risk of carbon leakage” of 26 May 2010, the following, among other things, was stated:14

“When the EU decided in 2008 to cut its greenhouse gas emissions, it showed its commitment to tackling the climate change threat and to lead the world in demonstrating how this could be done. The agreed cut of 20% from 1990 levels by 2020, together with a 20% renewables target, was a crucial step for the EU's sustainable development and a clear signal to the rest of the world that the EU was ready to take the action required. The EU will meet its Kyoto Protocol target and has a strong track record in climate action.

But it has always been clear that action by the EU alone will not be enough to combat climate change and also that a 20% cut by the EU is not the end of the story. EU action alone is not enough to deliver the goal of keeping global temperature increase below 2°C compared to pre-industrial levels. All countries will need to make an additional effort, including cuts of 80– 95% by 2050 by developed countries. An EU target of 20% by 2020 is just a first step to put emissions onto this path.

That was why the EU matched its 20% unilateral commitment with a commitment to move to 30%, as part of a genuine global effort. This remains EU policy today.

Since the EU policy was agreed, circumstances have been changing rapidly. We have seen an economic crisis of unprecedented scale. It has put huge pressure onto businesses and communities across Europe, as well as causing huge stress on public finances. But at the same time, it has confirmed that there are huge opportunities for Europe in building a resourceefficient society.

We have also had the Copenhagen summit. Despite the disappointment of failing to achieve the goal of a full, binding international agreement to tackle climate change, the most positive result was that countries accounting for some 80% of emissions today made pledges to cut emissions, even though these will be insufficient to meet the 2°C target. It will remain essential to integrate the Copenhagen Accord in on-going UNFCCC negotiations (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). But the need for action remains as valid as ever.

The purpose of this Communication is not to decide now to move to a 30% target: the conditions set are clearly not met. To facilitate a more informed debate on the implications of the different levels of ambition, this Communication sets out the result of analysis into the implications of the 20% and 30% targets as seen from today's perspective. (…)”

2.64.  In the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the regions of 8 March 2011, entitled “A roadmap for moving to a competitive low carbon economy in 2050”, the following was stated, among other things:15

  1. 1.  EUROPE'S KEY CHALLENGES

    (…) In order to keep climate change below 2ºC, the European Council reconfirmed in February 2011 the EU objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 8095% by 2050 compared to 1990, in the context of necessary reductions according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change by developed countries as a group. This is in line with the position endorsed by world leaders in the Copenhagen and the Cancun Agreements. These agreements include the commitment to deliver long-term low carbon development strategies. Some Member States have already made steps in this direction, or are in the process of doing so, including setting emission reduction objectives for 2050. (…)

  2. 2.  MILESTONES TO 2050

    The transition towards a competitive low carbon economy means that the EU should prepare for reductions in its domestic emissions by 80% by 2050 compared to 1990. The Commission has carried out an extensive modelling analysis with several possible scenarios showing how this could be done, (…).

    This analysis of different scenarios shows that domestic emission reductions of the order of 40% and 60% below 1990 levels would be the costeffective pathway by 2030 and 2040, respectively. In this context, it also shows reductions of 25% in 2020. (…). Such a pathway would result in annual reductions compared to 1990 of roughly 1% in the first decade until 2020, 1.5% in the second decade from 2020 until 2030, and 2% in the last two decades until 2050. The effort would become greater over time as a wider set of costeffective technologies becomes available. (…)

    Emissions, including international aviation, were estimated to be 16% below 1990 levels in 2009. With full implementation of current policies, the EU is on track to achieve a 20% domestic reduction in 2020 below 1990 levels, and 30% in 2030. However, with current policies, only half of the 20% energy efficiency target would be met by 2020.

    If the EU delivers on its current policies, including its commitment to reach 20% renewables, and achieve 20% energy efficiency by 2020, this would enable the EU to outperform the current 20% emission reduction target and achieve a 25% reduction by 2020. This would require the full implementation of the Energy Efficiency Plan (…)

  3. 6.  CONCLUSIONS

    (…) In order to be in line with the 80 to 95% overall GHG reduction objective by 2050, the Roadmap indicates that a cost effective and gradual transition would require a 40% domestic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions compared to 1990 as a milestone for 2030, and 80% for 2050. (…)

    (…) This Communication does not suggest to set new 2020 targets, nor does it affect the EU's offer in the international negotiations to take on a 30% reduction target for 2020, if the conditions are right. This discussion continues based on the Commission Communication from 26 May 2010.”

2.65.  On 15 March 2012, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on the Roadmap referred to in 2.64, in which the Roadmap as well as the path and specific milestones for the reduction of the Community’s domestic emissions of 40%, 60% and 80% for 2030, 2040 and 2050, respectively, were endorsed.16

2.66.  On 22 January 2014, the European Commission published the following Communication: “Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the regions, “A policy framework for climate and energy in the period from 2020 to 2030”, in which the Commission announced the following, among other things:17

  1. 2.1  Greenhouse gas emissions target

    The Commission proposes to set a greenhouse gas emission reduction target for domestic EU emissions of 40% in 2030 relative to emissions in 1990. It is important to note that the policies and measures implemented and envisaged by the Member States in relation to their current obligations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will continue to have effect after 2020. If fully implemented and fully effective, these measures are expected to deliver a 32% reduction relative to emissions in 1990. This will require continued effort but at the same time shows that the proposed target for 2030 is achievable. Continuous appraisal will, however, be important to take account of the international dimension and to ensure that the Union continues to follow the least cost pathway to a lowcarbon economy.

    The EU level target must be shared between the ETS and what the Member States must achieve collectively in the sectors outside of the ETS. The ETS sector would have to deliver a reduction of 43% in GHG in 2030 and the non-ETS sector a reduction of 30% both compared to 2005. In order to bring about the required emissions reduction in the ETS sector, the annual factor by which the cap on the maximum permitted emissions within the ETS decreases will have to be increased from 1.74% currently to 2.2% after 2020.

    (…) The Commission sees no merit in proposing a higher "conditional target" ahead of the international negotiations. Should the outcome of the negotiations warrant a more ambitious target for the Union, this additional effort could be balanced by allowing access to international credits.”

2.67.  At the European Council meeting of 23/24 October 2014, European leaders reached agreement on the 2030 climate and energy policy framework for the European Union.18 The reduction targets referred to above and the adjustment of the emission ceilings within the ETS from the Commission’s proposal were adopted.

2.68.  On 25 February 2015, the European Commission published the “Communication to the European Parliament and the Council, entitled The Paris Protocol — A blueprint for tackling global climate change beyond 2020”, in which it announced the following, among other things:19

  1. 1.  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    According to the latest findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), without urgent action, climate change will bring severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts on all the world's people and ecosystems. Limiting dangerous rises in global average temperature to below 2°C compared with pre-industrial levels (the below 2°C objective) will require substantial and sustained reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by all countries.

    This global transition to low emissions can be achieved without compromising growth and jobs, and can provide significant opportunities to revitalise economies in Europe and globally. Action to tackle climate change also brings significant benefits in terms of public wellbeing. Delaying this transition will, however, raise overall costs and narrow the options for effectively reducing emissions and preparing for the impacts of climate change.

    All countries need to act urgently and collectively. Since 1994, the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have focused on this challenge, resulting in more than 90 countries, both developed and developing, pledging to curb their emissions by 2020. However, these pledges are insufficient to achieve the below 2°C objective. For these reasons, in 2012, the UNFCCC Parties launched negotiations towards a new legally binding agreement applicable to all Parties that will put the world on track to achieve the below 2°C objective. The 2015 Agreement is to be finalised in Paris in December 2015 and implemented from 2020. (…)

    Well ahead of the Lima conference, the EU continued to show leadership and determination to tackle climate change globally. At the European Summit in October 2014, European leaders agreed that the EU should step up its efforts and domestically reduce its emissions by at least 40% compared to 1990 by 2030. This was followed by announcements of China and the US. In Lima, EU Member States pledged about half of the initial capitalisation of US$10 billion to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) to assist developing countries. Within the EU, a new investment plan was adopted. This will unlock public and private investments in the real economy of at least €315 billion over the next three years (2015–17). These investments will help modernise and further decarbonise the EU’s economy.

    This communication responds to the decisions taken in Lima, and is a key element in implementing the Commission's priority of building a resilient Energy Union with a forwardlooking climate change policy consistent with the President of the Commission's political guidelines. This communication prepares the EU for the last round of negotiations before the Paris conference in December 2015.”

In a national context

2.69.  Article 21 of the Dutch Constitution reads as follows:

It shall be the concern of the authorities to keep the country habitable and to protect and improve the environment.

2.70.  Under the EC Greenhouse Gas Emission Allowance Trading Directive (Implementation) Act of 30 September 2004, and by amending the Environmental Management Act, among other acts, the ETS Directive was converted into national law. A sixteenth chapter was added to the Environmental Management Act, entitled “Emission Allowance Trading”. Put briefly, this chapter regulates the issuance of permits to businesses with greenhouse gas installations and the issuance, allocation and use of emission allowances. Directive No 2009/29/EC was implemented with the “EC Greenhouse Gas Emission Allowance Trading Directive (Review) Act” of 12 April 2012. The Explanatory Memorandum to this Act contains the following sections, among others:20

  1. 5.  EU ceiling

    1. 5.1.  Introduction

      In phase I and II of the ETS, each Member State had separate emission ceilings. The calculation of the allocation of emission allowances also took place on a national level, by means of a National Allocation Plan (hereinafter: NAP). This approach was in line with the national Kyoto commitments. Phase III introduces a European ceiling and strict European regulation for the allocation of emission allowances. Under Article 9 of Directive 2003/87/EC, an absolute number of emission allowances for the entire Community (hereinafter: EU ceiling) was introduced. The EU has set as an objective to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases by at least 20% by 2020 compared to 1990. The year 1990 was chosen, as this is also the base year in the Kyoto Protocol. This objective relates to all sectors, including the sectors that fall under the scope of the ETS and the sectors that do not fall under that system (hereinafter: non-ETS sectors). An example of a non-ETS sector is the built environment. The objective for 1990 can be translated into an objective for 2005 and thus corresponds with a 14% reduction in 2020 compared to 2005. This translation is needed, as 2005 is the start year for the ETS and data verified in the ETS will be published in 2005. The overall objective is divided over the ETS and non-ETS sectors. The reduction for the non-ETS sectors is set at 10% compared to 2005; and for the ETS sector at 21% compared to 2005. The ETS objective of -21% means that all ETS sectors combined have to achieve the 21% reduction compared to 2005. These objectives of -10% and -21% apply to phase III of the ETS. The non-ETS objectives have been divided over the various Member States. The Netherlands has a reduction obligation of 16% compared to the level of 2005. By way of comparison, the reduction obligations of several Member States are depicted in the diagram below.[1]

      This objective has been depicted in the figure below.

Figuur 1:  Uitsplitsing EU-doel 2020 in ETS en non-ETS

{TRANSLATION OF FIGURE

Figure 1: EU objective for 2020 divided into ETS and non-ETS

EU objective: -14% compared to 2005

ETS objective: -21% compared to 2005

Non-ETS objective: -10% compared to 2005

NL: -16% UK: -16% BE: -15% GER: -14%}

2.71.  The “New energy for the climate Work Programme of the Clean and Sustainable Project” (Werkprogramma Nieuwe energie voor het klimaat van het project Schoon en Zuinig) rom 2007, in which the then cabinet formulated its climate policy, contains as a climate objective a 30% reduction for 2020 compared to 1990. According to the report, this means that as of 2020 an annual climate ceiling of 150Mt CO2eq. will apply. The report states the following, among other things:

“Climate change calls for action, as it threatens our security, food supply, water management and biodiversity. In this work programme, the cabinet focuses on ambitious climate targets: a 30% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 (compared to 1990) is needed, preferably in a European context (…). The European target is a 20% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the absence of a global agreement. In light of the Dutch objective of 30%, there is a chance that this will cause a shortfall in attaining the overall Dutch target. If European decision-making leads to a shortfall in the reduction targets the Netherlands has committed to, the cabinet will review whether it can reach agreement with other countries in similar situations (formulating high national reduction targets). If this fails, a part of the reduction shortfall will have to be covered by the government (…) and the reduction targets of sectors will be reassessed in consultation with the sectors.”

2.72.  In a letter of 29 April 2008 of the then Ministers of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment and Development Cooperation to the House of Representatives on the climate conference in Bali, the following, among other things, was stated:

“(…) First, the Netherlands will continue to take as a basis that the mean global temperature rise should be limited to 2 degrees over the pre-industrial level in order to keep the consequences of climate change manageable. Second, it remains important for the developed countries to take the lead by committing to a joint 30% reduction of their greenhouse gas emissions by 2020, compared to 1990. The third element is the notion that the participation of countries has to be expanded in a post-2012 regime. The Netherlands will continue to focus on agreements in which developing countries — particularly the larger countries and the countries that are experiencing rapid economic growth — also make tangible contributions and in some cases also commit to targets, depending on their different responsibilities and capabilities. Only then will it be possible to stabilise global emissions within 10 to 15 years and subsequently reduce them. (…)

The 13th Conference of the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention was held in Bali, Indonesia from 3 to 14 December of last year. The Netherlands was represented by Minister Cramer in the negotiations and the High Level Segment. In this capacity, she participated in the ministerial EU coordination and addressed the plenary session of the COP. In her statement, she called on the rich countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 25 to 40% by 2020 and to focus more on adaptation, deforestation and technology funds in developing countries. (…)”

2.73.  In her letter of 12 October 2009 with the subject “objective of the negotiations in Copenhagen and appreciation of the Commission’s announcement about climate financing”, the then Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment reported the following to the House of Representatives:

“Main elements of the field of influence

The negotiations essentially revolve around the well-known triangle of climate negotiations: reduction targets, mitigation actions of developing countries and financing.

The total of emission reductions proposed by the developed countries so far is insufficient to achieve the 25–40% reduction in 2020, which is necessary to stay on a feasible track to keep the 2 degrees objective within reach.(…)”

2.74.  In 2013, the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment drew up a Climate Agenda, “Climate Agenda: Resilient, Prosperous and Green” (Klimaatagenda: weerbaar, welvarend en groen). The second chapter, entitled “The Approach”, contains the following section:21

  1. 2.1  The Dutch contribution worldwide

    (…) Global climate agreements in a rapidly changing world

    The climate problem requires an international approach (…). The static agreements made over the years with highly divergent targets for developed and developing countries is no longer in line with the current dynamic situation of rapidly growing economies, including those of Brazil, South Africa and China. These changing relationships require a new and more effective global approach in order to involve as many parties as possible, including governments, the business community and civil society. Virtually all countries are combating climate change, although current efforts have not yielded the desired result of remaining under the 2 degree temperature rise. Efforts of countries such as Chine and the United States are, however, essential for making progress (…).

  2. 2.3  The national contribution: clear objectives and frameworks

    In part due to policy and also as a consequence of the recession, greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands have started to decline following years of escalation (…). This means that the Netherlands is on track to attain the commitments for 2008–2012 (Kyoto) and internationally for 2020.[20] Estimates gauge that non-ETS sectors will surpass the EU target for 2020, without the need to acquire allowances. However, the fact that the targets will be attained does not mean that we are sufficiently on course to achieve the required long-term emission reductions. (…) With the policy announced in the SER Energy Agreement and in this Climate Agenda, the cabinet seeks to ensure the required extra acceleration in the Netherlands to realise its objective of having a climateneutral economy in 2050.

    Mitigation targets

    The Dutch contribution in the EU is to attain a CO2 reduction of at least 40% in 2030. (…)

2.75.  On 6 September 2013, the State and over forty organisations concluded the “Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth” (Energieakkoord voor duurzame groei). This Agreement is intended to realise the following objectives:

  • —  an annual saving of 1.5% of the final energy consumption;

  • —  100 petajoules in energy savings in the final energy consumption in the Netherlands as of 2020;

  • —  an increase in the share of renewable energy generation (currently over 4%) to 14% in 2020;

  • —  a further increase of this share to 16% in 2023;

  • —  at least 15,000 fulltime positions, most to be created in the first few years.

2.76.  In her letter of 19 September 2013 to the House of Representatives, the State Secretary for Infrastructure and the Environment reported as follows:

“(…)

  • —  The crux of the matter is that the Netherlands argues for a greenhouse gas emission reduction of at least 40% by 2030 compared to 1990, as proposed by the Commission in the Green Paper (…).

  • —  The Netherlands considers a structural reinforcement of the European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) necessary and therefore argues to tighten the emission ceiling after 2020 and to attune it to the European reduction targets for 2030 and 2050 (…).

    1. 1.  Which lessons from the 2020 framework and from the current state of affairs of the EU’s energy should carry the most weight in designing the policy for 2030?

      According to analyses carried out by the Commission, the European Union’s 20% CO2 reduction target deviates from the most cost-efficient path to the objective of 80–95% in 2050. The European Union’s objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 20% is within reach. The European Union has not decided to raise it to the conditional target of 30%, partly because there is no agreement whether or not the formulated condition — a significant reduction by other major economies — has been met (…). With the climate and energy framework policy for 2030, the European Union would get back on track with to the most cost-efficient path to a decarbonised economy.”

2.77.  In response to an analysis carried out by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) and the PBL regarding the consequences for the Netherlands of the 2030 climate and energy policy framework proposed by the European Commission and of the targets stated therein, the State Secretary for Infrastructure and the Environment reported to the House of Representatives with her letter of 26 September 2014:

“As for the CO2 reduction target for the non-ETS sectors, the burden sharing among the Member States will be an important subject of discussion in the European negotiations. Depending on the criterion applied to the burden sharing, for the Netherlands this will result in a CO2 reduction of 28 to 48% for the non-ETS sectors in 2030. The ECN and the PBL state that the associated costs in the report are subject to uncertainties: the bandwidth of the emission level in the reference situation, for instance, is about 9Mt, to which the uncertainty of the data used in the calculations should also be added. Regarding the efforts for the Netherlands for the various reduction targets for non-ETS sectors, the research agencies have found as follows:

  • —  On a national level, achieving a 33% reduction target for non-ETS sectors and an associated target of 20% for renewable energy and 12% energy savings in 2030 is possible with the current policy.

  • —  The costs for a non-ETS target in the range 33–38% and an associated target of 21% for renewable energy and 12% energy savings are € 80 million — € 200 million per year.

  • —  Higher targets for non-ETS sectors will come with a sharp rise in costs for the Netherlands, up to € 870 — € 1,490 million per year at 43% and € 5 — € 15 billion at 48%.”

2.78.  In her letter of 24 February 2015, the State Secretary for Infrastructure and the Environment sent the House of Representatives the annotated agenda of the Environmental Council. It states the following, among other things:

The road to the UN Climate Conference Paris (COP21/CMP11)

Exchange of views and adoption of the intended nationally determined contribution to the EU

(…)

The Dutch position and field of influence

The Dutch objective is to attain an ambitious global climate agreement in which all parties participate. Not only does this apply to countries, but also to businesses, cities and civil society with which we cooperate on the road to a climateneutral world. The agreement will have to offer sufficient flexibility to countries to enable them to contribute according to their capacity. This does not mean that the new agreement should be nonbinding. Countries will have to monitor, report, and test and discuss the results. Subsequently we have to challenge countries to raise their ambitions to limit the global temperature rise to 2 degrees. Therefore, the Netherlands endorses the EU’s target of a 80–95% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 compared to 1990. In October 2014, the European Council set a binding target of at least a 40% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions for 2030, which serves as an intermediary step.”

The dispute

3.1.  In summary, after the amendment, Urgenda’s claim involves the court, with immediate effect:

to rule that:

  1. (1)  the substantial greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere worldwide are warming up the earth, which according to the best scientific insights, will cause dangerous climate change if those emissions are not significantly and swiftly reduced;

  2. (2)  the hazardous climate change that is caused by a warming up of the earth of 2°C or more, in any case of about 4 °C, compared to the preindustrial age, which according to the best scientific insights is anticipated with the current emission trends, is threatening large groups of people and human rights;

  3. (3)  of all countries which emit a significant number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, per capita emissions in the Netherlands are one of the highest in the world;

  4. (4)  the joint volume of the current annual greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands is unlawful;

  5. (5)  the State is liable for the joint volume of greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands;

  6. (6)  principally: the State acts unlawfully if it fails to reduce or have reduced the annual greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands by 40%, in any case at least 25%, compared to 1990, by the end of 2020;

    alternatively: the State acts unlawfully if it fails to reduce or have reduced the annual greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands by at least 40% compared to 1990, by the end of 2030;

and furthermore orders the State to:

  1. (7)  principally: to reduce or have reduced the joint volume of annual greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands that it will have been reduced by 40% by the end of 2020, in any case by at least 25%, compared to 1990;

    alternatively: reduce or have reduced the joint volume of annual greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands that it will have been reduced by at least 40% by 2030, compared to 1990;

  2. (8)  to publish or have published the text contained in the reply and also change of claim or a text to be drawn up by the court in the proper administration of justice immediately on the request of Urgenda, at a date to be determined by Urgenda and to be communicated to the State at least two weeks in advance, in no more than six national daily newspapers to be designated by Urgenda, full-page and page-filling, and by means of logos or other marks clearly and directly recognisable as originating from the State or the government;

  3. (9)  to publish and keep published on the homepage of the website www.rijksoverheid.nl the text referred to in (8), starting on the date of publication and also during two consecutive weeks, in such a manner that the text appears on screen clearly legible for all visitors to the website, without the need for any mouseclicking, and which has to be clicked to be closed before being able to go to other pages of the website;

    and

  4. (10)  orders the State to pay the costs of these proceeding.

3.2.  Briefly summarized, Urgenda supports its claims as follows.

The current global greenhouse gas emission levels, particularly the CO2 level, leads to or threatens to lead to a global warming of over 2 °C, and thus also to dangerous climate change with severe and even potentially catastrophic consequences. Such an emission level is unlawful towards Urgenda, as this is contrary to the due care exercised in society. Moreover, it constitutes an infringement of, or is contrary to, Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR, on which both Urgenda and the parties it represents can rely. The greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands additionally contribute to the (imminent) hazardous climate change. The Dutch emissions that form part of the global emission levels are excessive, in absolute terms and even more so per capita. This makes the greenhouse gas emissions of the Netherlands unlawful. The fact that emissions occur on the territory of the State and the State, as a sovereign power, has the capability to manage, control and regulate these emissions, means that the State has “systemic responsibility” for the total greenhouse gas emission level of the Netherlands and the pertinent policy. In view of this, the fact that the emission level of the Netherlands (substantially) contributes to one of several causes of hazardous climate change can and should be attributed to the State. In view of Article 21 of the Dutch Constitution, among other things, the State can be held accountable for this contribution towards causing dangerous climate change. Moreover, under national and international law (including the international-law “no harm” principle, the UN Climate Change Convention and the TFEU) the State has an individual obligation and responsibility to ensure a reduction of the emission level of the Netherlands in order to prevent dangerous climate change. This duty of care principally means that a reduction of 25% to 40%, compared to 1990, should be realised in the Netherlands by 2020. A reduction of this extent is not only necessary to continue to have a prospect of a limitation of global warming of up to (less than) 2°C, but is furthermore the most cost-effective. Alternatively, the Netherlands will need to have achieved a 40% reduction by 2030, compared to 1990. With its current climate policy, the State seriously fails to meet this duty of care and therefore acts unlawfully.

3.3.  The State argues as follows — also briefly summarised. Urgenda partially has no cause of action, namely in so far as it defends the rights and interests of current or future generations in other countries. Aside from that, the claims are not allowable, as there is no (real threat of) unlawful actions towards Urgenda attributable to the State, while the requirements of Book 6, Section 162 of the Dutch Civil Code and Book 3, Section 296 of the Dutch Civil Code have also not been met. The State acknowledges the need to limit the global temperature rise up to (less than) 2°C, but its efforts are, in fact, aimed at achieving this objective. The current and future climate policies, which cannot be seen as being separate from the international agreements nor from standards and (emission) targets formulated by the European Union, are expected to make this feasible. The State has no legal obligation — either arising from national or international law — to take measures to achieve the reduction targets stated in Urgenda’s claims. The implementation of the Dutch climate policy, which contains mitigation and adaptation measures, is not in breach of Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR. Allowing (part of) the claims is furthermore contrary to the State’s discretionary power. This would also interfere with the system of separation of powers and harm the State’s negotiating position in international politics.

3.4.  The arguments of the parties are examined in more detail below, in so far as relevant.

The assessment

A.  Introduction

4.1.  This case is essentially about the question whether the State has a legal obligation towards Urgenda to place further limits on greenhouse gas emissions — particularly CO2 emissions — in addition to those arising from the plans of the Dutch government, acting on behalf of the State. Urgenda argues that the State does not pursue an adequate climate policy and therefore acts contrary to its duty of care towards Urgenda and the parties it represents as well as, more generally speaking, Dutch society. Urgenda also argues that because of the Dutch contribution to the climate policy, the State wrongly exposes the international community to the risk of dangerous climate change, resulting in serious and irreversible damage to human health and the environment. Based on these grounds, which are briefly summarised here, Urgenda claims, except for several declaratory decisions, that the State should be ordered to limit, or have limited, the joint volume of the annual greenhouse gas emissions of the Netherlands so that these emissions will have been reduced by 40% and at least by 25% in 2020, compared to 1990. In case this claim is denied, Urgenda argues for an order to have this volume limited by 40% in 2030, also compared to 1990.

4.2.  For its part, the State argues that the Netherlands — also based on European agreements — pursues an adequate climate policy. Therefore, and for many other reasons, the State believes Urgenda’s claims cannot succeed. The key motivation is that the State cannot be forced at law to pursue another climate policy. The terms “the State” and “the Netherlands” will be used interchangeably below, depending on the context. The term “the State” refers to the legal person that is party to these proceedings, while the term “the Netherlands” refers to the same entity in an international context. The government is the State’s executive body.

4.3.  The court faces a dispute with complicated and “climate-related” issues. The court does not have independent expertise in this area and will base its assessment on that which the Parties have submitted and the facts admitted between them. This concerns both current scientific knowledge and (other) data the State acknowledges or deems to be correct. Many of these data are available under section 2 of this judgment (“The facts”). An analysis of these data, which are sometimes repeated, will enable the court to determine the severity of the climate change problem. Based on this information, the court will assess the claim and the defence put up against it. Prior to this, the court will assess Urgenda’s standing. If Urgenda is not in a position to confront the State about the issues that are the subject of these proceedings, the court is unable to proceed to assess the merits of the claim. This more indepth assessment (if applicable) will contain all further questions, including those pertaining to the absence, or not, of the State’s legal obligation towards Urgenda, and the question whether the court’s options also include imposing the order claimed by Urgenda.

B.  Urgenda’s standing (acting on its own behalf)

4.4.  Under Book 3, Section 303 of the Dutch Civil Code, an individual or legal person is only entitled to bring an action to the civil court if he has sufficient own, personal interest in the claim. Under Book 3, Section 303a of the Dutch Civil Code, a foundation or association with full legal capacity may also bring an action to the court pertaining to the protection of general interests or the collective interests of other persons, in so far as the foundation or association represents these general or collective interests based on the objectives formulated in its bylaws. However, there is a proviso, namely that the legal person concerned can only bring its action to the court if he, in the given circumstances, has made sufficient efforts to enter into a dialogue with the defendant to achieve having his requirements met (paragraph 2).

4.5.  The position of the State regarding Urgenda’s standing, in so far as this party acts on its own behalf, can be summarised as follows. The State does not challenge that Urgenda, in view of the interests it protects under its by-laws, has a case when on behalf of the current generations of Dutch citizens protests the emission of greenhouse gases from Dutch territory. Nor does the State contest Urgenda’s standpoint that the order to reduce emissions in these proceedings against the State in principle belongs to the group of claims the Dutch legislature finds allowable and has made possible with Book 3, Section 303a of the Dutch Civil Code. Regarding the question whether Urgenda has a case in so far as it defends the interests of future generations of Dutch citizens (and that “in perpetuity”), the State defers to the court’s opinion. The State argues that Urgenda has no case in so far as it defends the rights or interests of current or future generations in other countries.

4.6.  The court finds as follows. Urgenda’s claims against the State indeed belong to the group of claims the Dutch legislature finds allowable and has wanted to make possible with Book 3, Section 303a of the Dutch Civil Code. It was set out in the Explanatory Memorandum that an environmental organisation’s claim in order to protect the environment without an identifiable group of persons needing protection, would be allowable under the proposed scheme.22

4.7.  Article 2 of Urgenda’s by-laws stipulate that it strives for a more sustainable society, “beginning in the Netherlands”. This demonstrates prioritisation — as it rightly argues — and not a limitation to Dutch territory. The interests Urgenda wants to defend appear to be — from its objective formulated in its by-laws — primarily but not solely Dutch interests. Moreover, the term “sustainable society” has an inherent international (and global) dimension. As based on its by-laws Urgenda is defending the interest of a “sustainable society”, it actually protects an interest that by its nature crosses national borders. Therefore, Urgenda can partially base its claims on the fact that the Dutch emissions also have consequences for persons outside the Dutch national borders, since these claims are directed at such emissions.

4.8.  The term “sustainable society” also has an intergenerational dimension, which is expressed in the definition of “sustainability” in the Brundtland Report referred to under 2.3:

“Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

In defending the right of not just the current but also the future generations to availability of natural resources and a safe and healthy living environment, it also strives for the interest of a sustainable society. This interest of a sustainable society is also formulated in the legal standard invoked by Urgenda for the protection against activities which, in its view, are not “sustainable” and threaten to lead to serious threats to ecosystems and human societies. In this context, reference can also be made to Article 2 of the UN Climate Change Convention. Relying on Articles 2 and 8 ECHR, Urgenda’s claim is an extension of its objectives formulated in its by-laws. After all, these stipulations are also aimed at protecting the interests Urgenda seeks to defend.

4.9.  Seeing as it is not in dispute that Urgenda has met the requirement of Book 3, Section 305a of the Dutch Civil Code that it has made sufficient efforts to attain its claim by entering into consultations with the State, the court concludes that Urgenda’s claims, in so far as it acts on its own behalf, are allowable to the fullest extent.

4.10.  The court’s judgment about Urgenda’s standing is sufficient for now. On the pages below, the court will focus on Urgenda’s position for the time being. The position of the (886) principals on whose behalf Urgenda is also acting will be discussed at the end.

C.  Current climate science and climate policy

The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the IPCC

4.11.  Well before the 1990s, there was a growing realisation among scientists that human caused (anthropogenic) greenhouse gas emissions possibly led to a global temperature rise, and that this could have catastrophic consequences for man and the environment. This realisation led to the UN Climate Change Convention in 1992, of which the objective is formulated in Article 2, referred to in 2.37, as follows: to achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. As stated previously, 195 countries, including the Netherlands and the EU, have endorsed this objective.

4.12.  The UN Climate Change Convention also made provisions for the establishment of the IPCC as a global knowledge institute. The IPCC reports have bundled the knowledge of hundreds of scientists and to a great extent represent the current climate science. The IPCC is also an intergovernmental organisation. The IPCC’s findings serve as a starting point for the COP decisions, which are taken by the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention during their climate conferences. Similarly, the Dutch and European decisionmaking processes pertaining to the climate policies to be pursued are also based on the climate science findings of the IPCC. The court — and also the Parties — therefore considers these findings as facts.

The IPCC reports

4.13.  The IPCC’s reports have allowed for scientific uncertainty, a concept which comprises the question to what extent it is possible, based on scientific knowledge, to give a definitive answer about the probability of a negative effect occurring. In climate science, it has to be established (i) to what extent the current anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will increase the future greenhouse gas concentration and (ii), given many other circumstances, will result in dangerous climate change. The IPCC has stated in each of its reports how certain or uncertain its observations and findings are.

4.14.  In AR4/2007 and AR5/2013, the IPCC has established that a worldwide climate change is taking place and that it is very probable that human actions, particularly the combustion of fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal) and deforestation, are the main causes of the observed global warming since the middle of the nineteenth century. In AR4/2007, the IPCC furthermore has stated that a temperature rise of more than 2 °C over the preindustrial level would cause dangerous and irreversible climate change which would threaten the environment and man. This has resulted in the formulation of the aforementioned 2°C target. The IPCC has not changed this target in AR5/2013. The signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention, including, as stated previously, the Netherlands and the EU, have explicitly acknowledged these findings during the climate conference of 2010 (Cancun Agreements). The court therefore finds that the 2 °C target has globally been taken as the starting point for the development of climate policies. Incidentally, this comes with a restriction for a number of countries in the Pacific Ocean, such as Tuvalu and Fiji, for which dangerous climate change, with the associated risk of destruction of their entire territories, probably will already occur at a temperature rise of 1.5 °C. The signatories therefore decided in Cancun to “maintain a view on” a 1.5 °C target.

4.15.  The IPCC reports referred to here also state that the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions need to be decreased substantially in order to prevent dangerous climate change. This, too, has been acknowledged by the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention, including during the 2007 climate conference (Bali Action Plan) and again in 2010 (Cancun). From AR5/2013, supported by publications of other knowledge institutes, such as EDGAR (see 2.25) and UNEP (see 2.29), it is apparent that the global anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases is increasing rather than decreasing. The court also considers this information as certain.

4.16.  It is not disputed between the Parties that dangerous climate change has severe consequences on a global and local level. The IPCC has reported that the ice at the North and South Poles as well as alpine glaciers are melting due to global warming, which will result in a rise in sea levels. Moreover, the warming of the oceans is expected to result in increased hurricane activity, expansion of desert areas and the extinction of many animal species because of the heat, the latter causing a decline in biodiversity. People will suffer damage to their living environment because of these changes, for instance, a deterioration of food production. Furthermore, the temperature rise will lead to heatrelated deaths, particularly among the elderly and children. The IPCC reports also state that the current temperature rise causes damage to man and the environment. The 2 °C target, also assumed by the Netherlands, is intended to prevent climate change from becoming irreversible: without intervention, the aforementioned processes will become unstoppable.

4.17.  The reports of the PBL and KNMI are based on the IPCC reports and also describe that in the next hundred years the Netherlands will face higher average temperatures, changing precipitation patterns and a sea level rise. Chances of heatwaves in the summer will increase and extreme precipitation will become more prevalent. The basins of major rivers will on the one hand have to contend with more extreme precipitation, while on the other hand chances of a decreased amount of supplied water are high in the summer. High levels of river discharge, in combination with rising sea levels and high water levels at sea, could more frequently lead to dangerous situations in the downstream areas. Less water in the summer means, among other things, higher risks of salinization in the coastal areas and less freshwater for agriculture. The Netherlands will also feel the consequences of climate change elsewhere in the world. Some import products will become more expensive.23

4.18.  The aforementioned considerations lead to the following intermediate conclusion. Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are causing climate change. A highly hazardous situation for man and the environment will occur with a temperature rise of over 2 °C compared to the pre-industrial level. It is therefore necessary to stabilise the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which requires a reduction of the current anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions.

4.19.  Given the severity of the problem of hazardous climate change, climate scientists have investigated with which degree of probability current human actions have negative or positive effects on future climate change. Moreover, there is scientific uncertainty about the question when, where and to what extent which specific effects will occur, but also about the effectiveness and possible negative sideeffects of certain precautionary measures. Climate science (scientific research) therefore focuses on risk regulation: determining the desired convention and possible adverse effects. In view of this, the IPCC reports have described different scenarios which offer an insight into the consequences of a certain emission level for the environment and into the costs of achieving a certain emission level. Furthermore, it is being investigated with which scenario the 2 °C target can be achieved in the most cost-effective way (meaning: in the most efficient way, also in view of the related costs).

The maximum level of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere

4.20.  In AR4/2007, the IPCC has established that in order to achieve the 2 °C target the greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere have to be stabilised at 450 ppm, which will be referred to below as “the 450 scenario”. It is not disputed between the Parties that there is a 50% chance of achieving the climate target with the 450 scenario. The signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention have reported about the 450 scenario by making a reference to the AR4/2007 in the Bali Action Plan (the COP decision of 2007). The court does not deduce an explicit choice for the 450 scenario from this reference. The section referred to (see 2.16) shows that the signatories are at least focused on a scenario in which emissions are stabilised at a level of 450–550 ppm. The pleadings and other documents show that in 2007 the European institutions started from the idea that the greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere would have to remain well below 550 ppm and in the long term would have to stabilise at a level of about 450 ppm. As evidenced by these documents, this would mean that global emissions will reach a peak in 2025 and subsequently should decrease to 50% by 2050 (see 2.60).

4.21.  In AR5/2013, the IPCC made a more favourable estimate of the chances that the climate target will be reached with the 450 scenario, namely at over 66%. When starting from a concentration level of 500 ppm in 2100, those chances are over 50% according to the IPCC. However, the concentration level may not (temporarily) exceed the level of 530 ppm in the period before 2100. The chances that the climate target will not be achieved in that case are 33 to 66%. It is assumed that with scenarios with a concentration of 530 to 650 ppm, the chances of attaining the climate target are less than 33%. The documents submitted do not show that the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention have explicitly responded to these scenarios.

4.22.  From the IPCC reports listed here, the court concludes that in view of risk management and from scientific considerations, there is a strong preference for the 450 scenario, as the risks are much higher with a 500 scenario. In order to maintain a 50% chance of being able to prevent hazardous climate change, the current scientific position stipulates that the level of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere may not exceed 530 ppm.

The reduction targets

4.23.  In AR4/2007, the IPCC also determined that in order to prevent the concentration level from exceeding 450 ppm, global emissions of CO2-eq must to be substantially reduced. In order to achieve a concentration level of 450 ppm the total emissions of Annex I countries (which include the Netherlands and the EU as a whole) will at most have to be 20 to 40% lower in 2020 compared to 1990 — with due regard for a fair distribution. In 2050, the total emissions of these countries will need to have been reduced by 80 to 95% compared to 1990. The non-Annex I countries will also have to reduce their emissions substantially. The objective is to initiate a reduction before 2015 and to reduce the global emissions by 50% in 2050 compared to the year 2000.24

4.24.  In 2007, the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention, with reference to AR4/2007, acknowledged in the Bali Action Plan that “deep cuts” in the greenhouse gas emissions were urgent and necessary to prevent dangerous climate change. The section regarding this states that an emission reduction of 10–40% is required to keep concentration levels in the atmosphere below 450–550 ppm in 2020, and a reduction of 40–95% by 2050, both compared to the 1990 levels. During the 2010 climate conference in Cancun, the Ad Hoc Working Group of Annex I countries took a decision and expressly acknowledged that they will have to have limited their emissions by 25–40% by 2020, compared to 1990. In this decision, the Annex I countries urged themselves to adjust their reduction targets accordingly.

4.25.  In the European context, in response to AR4/2007, the European Council considered that the industrialised countries should take the lead and commit to a collective 30% reduction of their greenhouse gas emissions by 2020, compared to 1990. The Council also believed that the countries should also do this in order to reduce their collective emissions by 60–80% by 2050, compared to 1990. Therefore, the European Council established the reduction target at 30% in 2020, provided that other industrialised countries and economically more advanced countries commit to similar emission reductions. Therefore, the European Council commits to realising an international emission reduction of 20% in 2020 compared to 1990, and to a 30% reduction target if the aforementioned condition is met. However, the condition has not been met so far, keeping the EU-wide reduction target at 20% for 2020. Various policy documents of European institutions state that the EU’s 20% reduction target are not in line with the target for industrialised countries established by the IPCC, which after all is aimed at a 25–40% reduction in 2020 and an 80–95% reduction in 2050 (see 2.58, 2.61, 2.63 and 2.64).

4.26.  In the period 2007–2009, the Netherlands initially focused its climate policy on a reduction target of 30% in 2020 compared to 1990, which was therefore higher than the EU’s target of 20%. However, this reduction target deviated at a later stage. In these proceedings, the State has stated that the Dutch climate policy is based on a minimum reduction target of 16% in 2020 (compared to 2005) for the non-ETS sectors and 21% in 2020 (compared to 2005) for the ETS sectors. At the hearing, the State confirmed that the combined reduction for both sectors is expected to be 14 to 17% in 2020 compared to 1990.

4.27.  In AR5/2013, the IPCC established that the global greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 will have to be 40 to 70% lower than in the year 2010 to realise a concentration level of 450 ppm in 2100. In the year 2100, total emissions will need to have been reduced to at least zero or lower. At a concentration level of 500 ppm, a 25 to 55% reduction is expected for 2050. During the 2011 climate conference in Durban, agreement was reached that a new legally binding climate convention or protocol would have to be concluded in 2015. During the 2014 climate conference in Lima, the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention agreed to submit their own emission reduction targets before the upcoming climate conference in Paris.

4.28.  In 2014, the EU announced that it was striving for a reduction target of 40% by 2030 compared to 1990. The Netherlands supports this reduction target as well as the EU’s reduction target of 80% for 2050, both compared to 1990. The State has failed to explain which reduction target will apply to the Netherlands.

4.29.  The foregoing leads to the further intermediate conclusion that according to the current scientific position, the prevention of dangerous climate change calls for a 450 scenario with an associated reduction target for the Annex I countries, which includes the Netherlands and the EU as a whole, of 2540% in 2020, and 80–95% in 2050. The EU and the Netherlands have acknowledged this finding as such and (initially) focused on an emission reduction target of 30%. However, the EU subsequently refused to commit to more than a 20% reduction, with the Netherlands joining this path from about 2010. For 2030, the EU and the Netherlands have committed to a 40% reduction target; and to an 80% reduction target for 2050. This brings the reduction target back in line with the IPCC’s proposed reduction target for a 450 scenario for 2050.

The effect of the reduction measures thus far

4.30.  The EDGAR database shows that global emissions are increasing substantially despite the measures that have been taken so far. The UNEP reports reveal that the Annex I countries have failed to meet the 25–40% emission reduction target in 2020, which has left a “budget” of about 1,000 Gt. The UNEP has established that there is a discrepancy between the reduction that is required to achieve the climate objective and the reduction promised by the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention. At the same time, the institute has established that it will still be possible to close this gap in 2030.

Conclusions and specification of the scope of the dispute

4.31.  The court has made the following conclusions based on the foregoing.

  1. — i)  In AR4/2007, the 450 scenario is presented as necessary for a more than 50% chance of realising the 2 °C target, according to the parties. In AR5/2013, the IPCC established this chance at 66%. In order to realise the 450 scenario, Annex I countries need to attain a reduction resulting in an emission in 2020 of 35–40% below the level of 1990.

  2. — ii)  In accordance with this, the Netherlands has cooperated with the decision in Cancun (2010) in which it was established that the Annex I countries at least have to realise a 25–40% reduction in 2020.

  3. — iii)  In an international context the EU has committed to a reduction target of 20% for 2020, with an increase to 30% (both compared to 1990) if other Annex I countries commit to a similar reduction target. The standard of 20% for the EU is below the 30% standard deemed necessary by scientists.

  4. — iv)  The Netherlands has committed to the EU target of 30% reduction in 2020, provided that the other Annex I countries do the same.

  5. — v)  Up to about 2010, the Netherlands assumed a reduction target of 30% for 2020 compared to 1990, and after 2010 took on a reduction target that is derived from the EU reduction target of 20% and which is expected to result in a total reduction of 14–17% in 2020.

  6. — vi)  The Dutch reduction target is therefore below the standard deemed necessary by climate science and the international climate policy, meaning that in order to prevent dangerous climate change Annex I countries (including the Netherlands) must reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25–40% by 2020 to realise the 2°C target.

4.32.  From the foregoing it follows that it is currently very probable that within several decades dangerous climate change will occur with irreversible consequences for man and the environment. The State acknowledges that this is a serious problem and that it is also necessary to avert this threat by mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. The dispute between the Parties therefore does not concern the need for mitigation, but rather the pace, or the level, at which the State needs to start reducing greenhouse gas emissions. By way of explanation of the reduction percentages deemed necessary by Urgenda, the foundation argues that by not or no longer focusing on a reduction of 25–40% in 2020, but only on a reduction of 40% by 2030 and of 80–95% by 2050, the State will have higher emission levels than if it were to adhere to the intermediate objective of a 25–40% reduction in 2020. In this context, Urgenda refers to the graphs below (submitted during the plea):

{TRANSLATION

Reduction paths

Y axis: annual emissions

X axis: Fixed annual reduction — percentage

Fixed annual reduction — amount

Delayed reduction}

{TRANSLATION

Reduction paths up to 80% in 2030

X axis: Historical

Path EU 2010 to 2030

Path EU 2030 to 2050

Linear reduction

Fixed annual reduction (3.6%)}

{TRANSLATION

Reduction paths up to 95% in 2035

X axis: Historical

Path EU 2010 to 2030

Path EU 2030 to 2050

Path EU 2030 to 2050

Linear reduction

Fixed annual reduction (6.9%)}

Urgenda argues that the first graph — whose information is detailed further in the second and third graphs — shows that a delayed reduction path results in higher emissions than does a more evenly distributed reduction effort over the entire period up to the year 2050 or with a linear approach. Urgenda claims that graph also shows that a delayed reduction (less reduction until 2030 and more thereafter) will lead to higher total emissions and thereby increases the chances of exceeding the remaining “budget”. Urgenda also states that it is more cost-effective to intervene now, an argument that is based on AR5/2013 which states that scenarios in which the rigorous reduction is postponed to the 2030–2050 period lead to a greater dependence on CO2 reducing technologies. According to the same report, these technologies are not yet developed enough to contribute substantially to the reduction (see 2.19). In this context, Urgenda finally states that it is still possible for the EU to realise the 30% reduction target provided the condition would arise.

4.33.  The State argues that the Netherlands will reach a total reduction of 17% in 2020, as a derivative of the EU’s 20% reduction target. The Netherlands has committed to a 40% reduction for the year 2030 for the EU as a whole, while the State presumes a reduction percentage of 80–95% for the entire EU for the year 2050. The court has established that it is not clear yet which reduction percentages will apply to the Netherlands as a derivative of the European percentages. The State deems the milestones stated here sufficient for ensuring the 2 °C target.

4.34.  The final target for 2050 and the required intermediate target for 2030 is not disputed between the Parties. The State concurs with Urgenda’s argument that CO2 emissions will have to have been reduced by 80–95% in 2050, compared to 1990. Their dispute concentrates on the question whether the State is falling short — as argued by Urgenda — in its duty of care by pursuing a reduction target for 2020 that is lower than 25–40%, compared to 1990, which is the standard accepted in climate science and the international climate policy. First, the State argues that it cannot be forced at law towards Urgenda to adhere to the 25–40% target. Second, the State contests Urgenda’s argument that it is failing to meets its duty of care by pursuing the proposed lower target of 25–40% for 2020. In the following section, it is examined whether and if so, to what extent, the State is subject to an obligation towards Urgenda to pursue a reduction target higher than the current one for the Netherlands.

D.  Legal obligation of the State?

Introduction

4.35.  As mentioned briefly above, Urgenda accuses the State of several things, such as the State acting unlawfully by, contrary to its constitutional obligation (Article 21 of the Dutch Constitution), mitigating insufficiently as defined further in international agreements and in line with current scientific knowledge. In doing so, the State is damaging the interests it pursues, namely: to prevent the Netherlands from causing (more than proportionate) damage, from its territory, to current and future generations in the Netherlands and abroad. Furthermore, Urgenda argues that under Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR, the State has the positive obligation to take protective measures. Urgenda also claims that the State is acting unlawfully because, as a consequence of insufficient mitigation, it (more than proportionately) endangers the living climate (and thereby also the health) of man and the environment, thereby breaching its duty of care. Urgenda asserts that in doing so the State is acting unlawfully towards Urgenda in the sense of Book 6, Section 162 of the Dutch Civil Code, whether or not in combination with Book 5, Section 37 of the Dutch Civil Code. The State contests that a duty of care arises from these sections for a further limitation of emissions than currently realised by it. The court finds as follows.

Contravention of a legal obligation

Article 21 of the Constitution and international conventions

4.36.  Article 21 of the Dutch Constitution imposes a duty of care on the State relating to the liveability of the country and the protection and improvement of the living environment. For the densely populated and low-lying Netherlands, this duty of care concerns important issues, such as the water defences, water management and the living environment. This rule and its background do not provide certainty about the manner in which this duty of care should be exercised nor about the outcome of the consideration in case of conflicting stipulations. The manner in which this task should be carried out is covered by the government’s own discretionary powers.

4.37.  The realisation that climate change is an extra-territorial, global problem and fighting it requires a worldwide approach has prompted heads of state and government leaders to contribute to the development of legal instruments for combating climate change by means of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions as well as by making their countries “climate-proof” by means of taking mitigating measures. These instruments have been developed in an international context (in the UN), European context (in the EU) and in a national context. The Dutch climate policy is based on these instruments to a great extent.

4.38.  The Netherlands has committed itself to UN Climate Change Convention, a framework convention which contains general principles and starting points, which form the basis for the development of further, more specific, rules, for instance in the form of a protocol. The Kyoto Protocol is an example of this. The COP with a number of subsidiary organs was set up for the further development and implementation of a climate regime. Almost all COP’s decisions are not legally binding, but can directly affect obligations of the signatories to the convention or the protocol. This applies, for instance, to several decisions taken pursuant to the Kyoto Protocol. These involve mechanisms which enable the trade in emission (reduction) allowances and which allow collaboration between the parties so that greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced where it is cheapest.

4.39.  In this context, Urgenda also brought up the international-law “no harm” principle, which means that no state has the right to use its territory, or have it used, to cause significant damage to other states. The State has not contested the applicability of this principle.

4.40.  The care and protection of the living environment is also increasingly determined by the EU. The basis for the European environmental policy is enclosed in Article 19 TFEU. For the development and implementation of the Community’s environmental policy use has mostly been made of directives These often concern minimum harmonisation, so that on the one hand the entire Union will have a basic protection level while on the other hand the Member States still have the power to establish stricter standards for their own territories.

4.41.  In view of the obligation of Member States to take reduction measures, the implementation of the ETS Directive in Chapter 16 of the Environmental Management Act (see 2.70) is relevant to these proceedings. The Directive has introduced an emission allowance trading system, with the European Commission determining the CO2 emission ceiling for five year periods. The allowed emission level is allocated to the Member State concerned in the form of emission allowances. In the context of the EU, the Effort Sharing Decision (see 2.62) is also relevant. Based on these schemes, the Netherlands has committed itself to a 21% reduction of emissions that fall under the ETS in 2020, compared to 2005 and to a 16% reduction for non-ETS sectors in 2020, compared to 2005 (see 2.74).

4.42.  From an international-law perspective, the State is bound to UN Climate Change Convention, the Kyoto Protocol (with the associated Doha Amendment as soon as it enters into force) and the “no harm” principle. However, this international-law binding force only involves obligations towards other states. When the State fails one of its obligations towards one or more other states, it does not imply that the State is acting unlawfully towards Urgenda. It is different when the written or unwritten rule of international law concerns a decree that “connects one and all”. After all, Article 93 of the Dutch Constitution determines that citizens can derive a right from it if its contents can connect one and all. The court — and the Parties — states first and foremost that the stipulations included in the convention, the protocol and the “no harm” principle do not have a binding force towards citizens (private individuals and legal persons). Urgenda therefore cannot directly rely on this principle, the convention and the protocol (see, among other things, HR 6 February 2004, ECLI:NL: HR:2004:AN8071, NJ 2004, 329, Vrede et al./State).

4.43.  This does not affect the the fact that a state can be supposed to want to meet its international-law obligations. From this it follows that an international-law standard — a statutory provision or an unwritten legal standard — may not be explained or applied in a manner which would mean that the state in question has violated an international-law obligation, unless no other interpretation or application is possible. This is a generally acknowledged rule in the legal system. This means that when applying and interpreting national-law open standards and concepts, including social proprietary, reasonableness and propriety, the general interest or certain legal principles, the court takes account of such international-law obligations. This way, these obligations have a “reflex effect” in national law.

4.44.  The comments above regarding international-law obligations also apply, in broad outlines, to European law, including the TFEU stipulations, on which citizens cannot directly rely. The Netherlands is obliged to adjust its national legislation to the objectives stipulated in the directives, while it is also bound to decrees (in part) directed at the country. Urgenda may not derive a legal obligation of the State towards it from these legal rules. However, this fact also does not stand in the way of the fact that stipulations in an EU treaty or directive can have an impact through the open standards of national law described above.

Violation of a personal right

Articles 2 and 8 ECHR

4.45.  In assessing the question whether or not the State with its current climate policy is breaching one of Urgenda’s personal rights, the court considers that Urgenda itself cannot be designated as a direct or indirect victim, within the meaning of Article 34 ECHR, of a violation of Articles 2 and 8 ECHR. After all, unlike with a natural person, a legal person’s physical integrity cannot be violated nor can a legal person’s privacy be interfered with (cf. ECtHR 12 May 2015, Identoba et al./Georgia, no. 73235/12). Even if Urgenda’s objectives , formulated in its by-laws, are explained in such a way as to also include the protection of national and international society from a violation of Article 2 and 8 ECHR, this does not give Urgenda the status of a potential victim within the sense of Article 34 ECHR (cf. ECtHR 29 September 2009, Van Melle et al./Netherlands, no. 19221/08). Therefore, Urgenda itself cannot directly rely on Articles 2 and 8 ECHR.

4.46.  However, both articles and their interpretation given by the ECtHR, particularly with respect to environmental right issues, can serve as a source of interpretation when detailing and implementing open private-law standards in the manner described above, such as the unwritten standard of care of Book 6, Section 162 of the Dutch Civil Code. Therefore, the court will now — briefly — reflect on the environmental law principles and scope of protection of Articles 2 and 8 ECHR, such as those that can be derived from the ECtHR’s rulings.

4.47.  At the recommendation of the Parliamentary Assembly and by order of (and under the responsibility of) the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, a “Manual on human rights and the environment” was published for the first time, in 2005. The goal of this manual is to raise awareness among a wide audience about the relationship between the protection of the human rights under the ECHR and the environment, thereby contributing to the reinforcement of environmental law protection on a national level. With this goal in mind, the manual (and other documents) provides information about the rulings of the ECtHR in this area and also pays attention to the impact of the European Social Charter and the relevant explanation of this charter by the European Committee of Social Rights. The last version of the manual was published in 2012. In so far as an explanation is given of the ECtHR’s rulings below, the court concurs with it.

4.48.  Part II of the manual describes the environemental principles that can be derived from the ECtHR’s rulings. The court deems the following passages from this part relevant:

“(…) the Court has emphasised that the effective enjoyment of the rights which are encompassed in the Convention depends notably on a sound, quiet and healthy environment conducive to well-being. The subject-matter of the cases examined by the Court shows that a range of environmental factors may have an impact on individual convention rights, such as noise levels from airports, industrial pollution, or town planning.

As environmental concerns have become more important nationally and internationally since 1950, the caselaw of the Court has increasingly reflected the idea that human rights law and environmental law are mutually reinforcing. Notably, the Court is not bound by its previous decisions, and in carrying out its task of interpreting the Convention, the Court adopts an evolutive approach. Therefore, the interpretation of the rights and freedoms is not fixed but can take account of the social context and changes in society. As a consequence, even though no explicit right to a clean and quiet environment is included in the Convention or its protocols, the caselaw of the Court has shown a growing awareness of a link between the protection of the rights and freedoms of individuals and the environment. The Court has also made reference, in its case law, to other international environmental law standards and principles (…).

However, it is not primarily upon the European Court of Human Rights to determine which measures are necessary to protect the environment, but upon national authorities. The Court has recognised that national authorities are best placed to make decisions on environmental issues, which often have difficult social and technical aspects. Therefore, in reaching its judgments, the Court affords the national authorities in principle a wide discretion — in the language of the Court a wide “margin of appreciation” — in their decision-making in this sphere. This is the practical implementation of the principle of subsidiarity, which has been stressed in the Interlaken Declaration of the High Level Conference on the Future of the European Court of Human Rights. According to this principle, violations of the Convention should be prevented or remedied at the national level with the Court intervening only as a last resort. The principle is particularly important in the context of environmental matters due to their very nature.”

4.49.  The scope of protection based on various articles of the ECHR regarding environmental issues has been detailed in separate chapters. In the context of this case, the court finds the following principles from the first chapter of part II (“Chapter I: the right to life and environment”) relevant, including the subsequent explanation (the footnotes referring to the rulings of the ECtHR concerned have not been included in the quotation):

  1. (a)  The right to life is protected under Article 2 of the Convention.

    This Article does not solely concern deaths resulting directly from the actions of the agents of a State, but also lays down a positive obligation on States to take appropriate steps to safeguard the lives of those within their jurisdiction. This means that public authorities have a duty to take steps to guarantee the rights of the Convention even when they are threatened by other (private) persons or activities that are not directly connected with the State.

    1. 1.  (…) in some situations Article 2 may also impose on public authorities a duty to take steps to guarantee the right to life when it is threatened by persons or activities not directly connected with the State. (…) In the context of the environment, Article 2 has been applied where certain activities endangering the environment are so dangerous that they also endanger human life.

    2. 2.  It is not possible to give an exhaustive list of examples of situations in which this obligation might arise. It must be stressed however that cases in which issues under Article 2 have arisen are exceptional. So far, the Court has considered environmental issues in four cases brought under Article 2, two of which relate to dangerous activities and two which relate to natural disasters. In theory, Article 2 can apply even though loss of life has not occurred, for example in situations where potentially lethal force is used inappropriately.

  2. ( b)  The Court has found that the positive obligation on States may apply in the context of dangerous activities, such as nuclear tests, the operation of chemical factories with toxic emissions or waste-collection sites, whether carried out by public authorities themselves or by private companies. In general, the extent of the obligations of public authorities depends on factors such as the harmfulness of the dangerous activities and the foreseeability of the risks to life.

  3. ( c)  (…)

  4. ( d)  In the first place, public authorities may be required to take measures to prevent infringements of the right to life as a result of dangerous activities or natural disasters. This entails, above all, the primary duty of a State to put in a place a legislative and administrative framework which includes: (…)”

4.50.  The following principles from Chapter II (“respect for private and family life as well as the home and the environment”), with explantion, are relevant:

  1. (a)  (…)

  2. ( b)  Environmental degradation does not necessarily involve a violation of Article 8 as it does not include an express right to environmental protection or nature conservation.

  3. (c )  For an issue to arise under Article 8, the environmental factors must directly and seriously affect private and family life or the home. Thus, there are two issues which the Court must consider — whether a causual link exists between the activity and the negative impact on the individual and whether the adverse have attained a certain threshold of harm. The assessment of that minimum threshold depends on all the circumstances of the case, such as the intensity and duration of the nuisance and its physical or mental effects, as well as on the general environmental context.

    (…)

    1. 15.  In the Kyrtatos v. Greece case, the applicants brought a complaint under Article 8 alleging that urban development had led to the destruction of a swamp adjacent to their property, and that the area around their home had lost its scenic beauty. The Court emphasised that domestic legislation and certain other international instruments rather than the Convention are more appropriate to deal with the general protection of the environment. The purpose of the Convention is to protect individual human rights, such as the right to respect for the home, rather than the general aspirations or needs of the community taken as a whole. The Court highlighted in this case that neither Article 8 nor any of the other articles of the Convention are specifically designed to provide general protection of the environment as such. In this case, the Court found no violation of Article 8.

  4. ( d)  While the objective of Article 8 is essentially that of protecting the individual against arbitrary interference by public authorities, it may also imply in some cases an obligation on public authorities to adopt positive measures designed to secure the rights enshrined in this article. This obligation does not only apply in cases where environmental harm is directly caused by State activities but also when it results from private sector activities. Public authorities must make sure that such measures are implemented so as to guarantee rights protected under Article 8. The Court has furthermore explicitly recognised that public authorities may have a duty to inform the public about environmental risks. Moreover, the Court has stated with regard to the scope of the positive obligation that it is generally irrelevant of whether a situation is assessed from the perspective of paragraph 1 of Article 8 which, inter alia, relates to the positive obligations of State authorities, or paragraph 2 asking whether a State interference was justified, as the principles applied are almost identical.

    (…)”

Book 5, Section 37 of the Dutch Civil Code

4.51.  In so far as Urgenda has relied on Book 5, Section 37 of the Dutch Civil Code (nuisance), the court is of the opinion that in addition to that which is stated below about the duty of care, this section does not have an independent meaning.

Intermediate conclusion about the duty of care

4.52.  The foregoing leads the court to conclude that a legal obligation of the State towards Urgenda cannot be derived from Article 21 of the Dutch Constitution, the “no harm” principle, the UN Climate Change Convention, with associated protocols, and Article 191 TFEU with the ETS Directive and Effort Sharing Decision based on TFEU. Although Urgenda cannot directly derive rights from these rules and Articles 2 and 8 ECHR, these regulations still hold meaning, namely in the question discussed below whether the State has failed to meet its duty of care towards Urgenda. First of all, it can be derived from these rules what degree of discretionary power the State is entitled to in how it exercises the tasks and authorities given to it. Secondly, the objectives laid down in these regulations are relevant in determing the minimum degree of care the State is expected to observe. In order to determine the scope of the State’s duty of care and the discretionary power it is entitled to, the court will therefore also consider the objectives of international and European climate policy as well as the principles on which the policies are based.

Breach of standard of due care observed in society, discretionary power

4.53.  The question whether the State is in breach of its duty of care for taking insufficient measures to prevent dangerous climate change, is a legal issue which has never before been answered in Dutch proceedings and for which jurisprudence does not provide a ready-made framework. The answer to the question whether or not the State is taking sufficient mitigation measures depends on many factors, with two aspects having particular relevance. In the first place, it has to be assessed whether there is a unlawful hazardous negligence on the part of the State. Secondly, the State’s discretionary power is relevant in assessing the government’s actions. From case law about government liability it follows that the court has to assess fully whether or not the State has exercised or exercises sufficient care, but that this does not alter the fact that the State has the discretion to determine how it fulfils its duty of care. However, this discretionary power vested in the State is not unlimited: the State’s care may not be below standard. However, the test of due care required here and the discretionary power of the State are not wholly distinguishable. After all, the detailing of the duty of care of the person called to account will also have been included in his specific position in view of the special nature of his duty or authority. The standard of care has been attuned to this accordingly.

Factors to determine duty of care

4.54.  Urgenda has relied on the “Kelderluik” ruling of the Supreme Court (HR 5 November 1965, ECLI:NL:HR:1965:AB7079, NJ 1966, 136) and on jurisprudence on the doctrine of hazardous negligence developed later to detail the requirement of acting with due care towards society. Understandably, the State has pointed out the relevant differences between this juridprudence and this case. This case is different in that the central focus is on dealing with a hazardous global development, of which it is uncertain when, where and to what extent exactly this hazard will materialise. Nevertheless, the doctrine of hazardous negligence, as explained in the literature, bears a resemblance to the theme of hazardous climate change, so that several criteria stated below can be derived from hazardous negligence jurisprudence in order to detail the concept of acting negligently towards society.25

4.55.  In principle, the extent to which the State is entitled to a scope for policymaking is determined by the statutory duties and powers vested in the State. As has been stated above, under Article 21 of the Constitution, the State has a wide discretion of power to organise the national climate policy in the manner it deems fit. However, the court is of the opinion that due to the nature of the hazard (a global cause) and the task to be realised accordingly (shared risk management of a global hazard that could result in an impaired living climate in the Netherlands), the objectives and principles, such as those laid down in the UN Climate Change Convention and the TFEU, should also be considered in determining the scope for policymaking and duty of care.

4.56.  The objectives and principles of the international climate policy have been formulated in Articles 2 and 3 of the UN Climate Change Convention (see 2.37 and 2.38). The court finds the principles under (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) particularly relevant for establishing the scope for policymaking and the duty of care. These read as follows, in brief:

  1. (i)  protection of the climate system, for the benefit of current and future generations, based on fairness;

  2. (iii)  the precautionary principle;

  3. (iv)  the sustainability principle.

4.57.  The principle of fairness (i) means that the policy should not only start from what is most beneficial to the current generation at this moment, but also what this means for future generations, so that future generations are not exclusively and disproportionately burdened with the consequences of climate change. The principle of fairness also expresses that industrialised countries have to take the lead in combating climate change and its negative impact. The justification for this, and this is also noted in literature, lies first and foremost in the fact that from a historical perspective the current industrialised countries are the main causers of the current high greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere and that these countries also benefited from the use of fossil fuels, in the form of economic growth and prosperity. Their prosperity also means that these countries have the most means available to take measures to combat climate change.26

4.58.  With the precautionary principle (ii) the UN Climate Change Convention expresses that taking measures cannot be delayed to await full scientific certainty. The signatories should anticipate the prevention or limitation of the causes of climate change or the prevention or limitation of the negative consequences of climate change, regardless of a certain level of scientific uncertainty. In making the consideration that is needed for taking precautionary measures, without having absolute certainty whether or not the actions will have sufficient effects, the Convention states that account can be taken of a costbenefit ratio: precautionary measures which yield positive results worldwide at as low as possible costs will be taken sooner.

4.59.  The sustainability principle (iv) expresses that the signatories to the Convention will promote sustainability and that economic development is vital for taking measures to combat climate change.

4.60.  The objectives of the European climate policy have been formulated in Article 191, paragraph 1 TFEU (see 2.53). The following are the principles relevant to this case (as evidenced by paragraph 2 of this article):

  • —  the principle of a high protection level;

  • —  the precautionary principle;

  • —  the prevention principle.

4.61.  With the principle of a high protection level, the EU expresses that its environmental policy has high priority and that it has to be implemented strictly, with account taken of regional differences. The precautionary principle also means that the Community should not postpone taking measures to protect the environment until full scientific certainty has been achieved. In short, the prevention principle means: “prevention is better than cure”; it is better to prevent climate problems (pollution, nuisance, in this case: climate change) than combating the consequences later on.

4.62.  Article 191, paragraph 3 TFEU also means that in determining its environmental policy, the EU takes account of:

  • —  the available scientific and technical information;

  • —  the environmental circumstances in the various EU regions;

  • —  the benefits and nuisances that could ensue from taking action or failing to take action;

  • —  the economic and social development of the Union as a whole and the balanced development of its regions.

4.63.  The objectives and principles stated here do not have a direct effect due to their international and private-law nature, as has been considered above. However, they do determine to a great extent the framework for and the manner in which the State exercises its powers. Therefore, these objectives and principles constitute an important viewpoint in assessing whether or not the State acts wrongfully towards Urgenda. With due regard for all the above, the answer to the question whether or not the State is exercising due care with its current climate policy depends on whether according to objective standards the reduction measures taken by the State to prevent hazardous climate change for man and the environment are sufficient, also in view of the State’s discretionary power. In determining the scope of the duty of care of the State, the court will therefore take account of:

  1. ( i)  the nature and extent of the damage ensuing from climate change;

  2. (ii)  the knowledge and foreseeability of this damage;

  3. (iii)  the chance that hazardous climate change will occur;

  4. (iv)  the nature of the acts (or omissions) of the State;

  5. ( v)  the onerousness of taking precautionary measures;

  6. (vi)  the discretion of the State to execute its public duties — with due regard for the publiclaw principles, all this in light of:

    • —  the latest scientific knowledge;

    • —  the available (technical) option to take security measures, and

    • —  the cost-benefit ratio of the security measures to be taken.

Duty of care

(i–iii)  the nature and extent of the damage ensuing from climate change, the knowledge and foreseeability of this damage and the chance that hazardous climate change will occur

4.64.  As has been stated before, the Parties agree that due to the current climate change and the threat of further change with irreversible and serious consequences for man and the environment, the State should take precautionary measures for its citizens. This concerns the extent of the reduction measures the State should take as of 2020.

4.65.  Since it is an established fact that the current global emissions and reduction targets of the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention are insufficient to realise the 2° target and therefore the chances of dangerous climate change should be considered as very high — and this with serious consequences for man and the environment, both in the Netherlands and abroad — the State is obliged to take measures in its own territory to prevent dangerous climate change (mitigation measures). Since it is also an established fact that without farreaching reduction measures, the global greenhouse gas emissions will have reached a level in several years, around 2030, that realising the 2° target will have become impossible, these mitigation measures should be taken expeditiously. After all, the faster the reduction of emissions can be initiated, the bigger the chance that the danger will subside. In the words of Urgenda: trying to slow down climate change is like trying to slow down an oil tanker that has to shut down its engines hundreds of kilometres off the coast not to hit the quay. If you shut down the engines when the quay is in sight, it is inevitable that the oil tanker will sooner or later hit the quay. The court also takes account of the fact that the State has known since 1992, and certainly since 2007, about global warming and the associated risks. These factors lead the court to the opinion that, given the high risk of hazardous climate change, the State has a serious duty of care to take measures to prevent it.

(iv)  the nature of the acts (or omission) of the State

4.66.  The State has argued that it cannot be seen as one of the causers of an imminent climate change, as it does not emit greenhouse gases. However, it is an established fact that the State has the power to control the collective Dutch emission level (and that it indeed controls it). Since the State’s acts or omissions are connected to the Dutch emissions a high level of meticulousness should be required of it in view of the security interests of third parties (citizens), including Urgenda. Apart from that, when it became a signatory to the UN Climate Change Convention and the Kyoto Protocol, the State expressly accepted its responsibility for the national emission level and in this context accepted the obligation to reduce this emission level as much as needed to prevent dangerous climate change. Moreover, citizens and businesses are dependent on the availability of nonfossil energy sources to make the transition to a sustainable society. This availability partly depends on the options for providing “green energy” (compare, for instance, legislative proposal 34 058, Wind energy at sea, which is currently being reviewed by the Senate). The State therefore plays a crucial role in the transition to a sustainable society and therefore has to take on a high level of care for establishing an adequate and effective statutory and instrumental framework to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions in the Netherlands.

(v)  the onerousness of taking precautionary measures

4.67.  In answering the question if and if so, to what extent, the State has the obligation to take precautionary measures, it is also relevant to find out whether taking precautionary measures is onerous. Various aspects can be discerned in this. For instance, it is important to know whether the measures to be taken are costly. Moreover, it may also be important to establish whether the precautionary measures are costly in relation to the possible damage. The effectiveness of the measures can also be relevant. Finally, significance should be attached to the availability of the (technical) possibilities to take the required measures.

4.68.  Subject of the dispute between the Parties is the question if the reduction target intended by the State or the reduction target ordered by Urgenda is the most cost effective. This concerns macro economic costs of a particular mitigation policy. The IPCC reports describe prognoses per scenario.

4.69.  Urgenda has argued that it is more cost-effective to maintain the (stricter) reduction target of 25–40% in 2020. Referring to European policy documents, the State has alleged that it is also cost-effective to realise a 40% reduction in 2030 and 80% in 2050 (see 2.64 and 2.66). The court finds as follows.

4.70.  Assuming — as has been considered above — that in its foreign policy the State for a long time has started from a required reduction of 25–40% in 2020 for Annex I countries, compared to 1990 and consequently has committed to the EU’s aim to formulate a 30% reduction target for 2020. Up to about 2010, the Netherlands had had a national reduction target of 30% for 2020 (compared to 1990). According to the then cabinet, in 2009, a scientifically established emission reduction of 25–40% by 2020 was needed in order to attain the 2°C target and to “stay on a plausible route to keep [that] target within reach” (see 2.73). Apparently, this reduction target was then deemed to be cost-effective. The State has not argued that the decision to let go of this national reduction target of 30% and instead follow the EU target of 20% for 2020, compared to 1990 (which according to the current prognoses comes down to a reduction in the Netherlands of about 17%), was driven by improved scientific insights or because it was allegedly not economically responsible to continue to maintain that 30% target. Nor did the State issue concrete details from which it could be derived that the reduction path of 2540% in 2020 would lead to disproportionately high costs, or would not be cost-effective in comparison with the slower reduction path for other reasons. On the contrary: at the hearing of 14 April 2015, the State confirmed that it would be possible for the Netherlands to meet the EU’s 30% target for 2020 provided that the condition for that target was met in the short term. Based on this, the court concludes that there is no serious obstacle from a cost consideration point of view to adhere to a stricter reduction target.

4.71.  The court also considers that in climate science and the international climate policy there is consensus that the most serious consequences of climate change have to be prevented. It is known that the risks and damage of climate change increase as the mean temperature rises. Taking immediate action, as argued by Urgenda, is more costeffective, is also supported by the IPCC and UNEP (see 2.19 and 2.30). The reports concerned also prove that mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions in the short and long term is the only effective way to avert the danger of climate change. Although adaptation measures can reduce the effects of climate change, they do not eliminate the danger of climate change. Mitigation therefore is the only really effective tool.

4.72.  The court has deduced from the various reports submitted by the Parties that mitigation can be realised in various ways. This could include the limitation of the use of fossil fuels by means of, among other things, emissions trading or tax measures, the introduction of renewable energy sources, the reduction of energy consumption and reforestation and combating deforestation. The State has also referred to new technologies such as CO2 capture and storage. The court deems the State’s viewpoint that a high level of CO2 reduction can be expected to be achieved in the future through CO2 capture and storage insufficiently supported. Such an expectation would be relevant if it has been established that the use of these techniques would enable such a reduction that the emission between now and 2050, as depicted in the first graph above, could be compensated. Without sufficient objection from the State, Urgenda has argued that in so far as these techniques are sufficiently available (CO2 capture and storage are still in the experimental phase) it is not plausible that techniques of this nature can be applied in the short term and therefore in time. Urgenda has also referred to the further regulations required for that. At the hearing, it was brought up that initiatives have been taken in various areas, such as for renewable energy (the legislative proposal 34 058 for wind energy at sea, referred to above) and for CO2 capture and storage, but that these initiatives are still in the preliminary stages without any concrete prospect of success. In the UNEP and IPCC reports, which the Parties have referred to, it is therefore emphasised that later intervention increases the need for new technologies, while the risks and options of these technologies are still uncertain.

4.73.  Based on its considerations here, the court concludes that in view of the latest scientific and technical knowledge it is the most efficient to mitigate and it is more cost-effective to take adequate action than to postpone measures in order to prevent hazardous climate change. The court is therefore of the opinion that the State has a duty of care to mitigate as quickly and as much as possible.

(vi)  the discretion of the State to execute its public duties — with due regard for the public-law principles

4.74.  In answering the question whether the State is exercising enough care with its current climate policy, the State’s discretionary power should also be considered, as stated above. Based on its statutory duty — Article 21 of the Constitution — the State has an extensive discretionary power to flesh out the climate policy. However, this discretionary power is not unlimited. If, and this is the case here, there is a high risk of dangerous climate change with severe and life-threatening consequences for man and the environment, the State has the obligation to protect its citizens from it by taking appropriate and effective measures. For this approach, it can also rely on the aforementioned jurisprudence of the ECtHR. Naturally, the question remains what is fitting and effective in the given circumstances. The starting point must be that in its decision-making process the State carefully considers the various interests. Urgenda has stated that the State meets its duty of care if it applies a reduction target of 40%, 30% or at least 25% for the year 2020. The State has contested this with reference to the intended adaptation measures.

4.75.  The court emphasises that this first and foremost should concern mitigation measures, as adaptation measures will only allow the State to protect its citizens from the consequences of climate change to a limited level. If the current greenhouse gas emissions continue in the same manner, global warming will take such a form that the costs of adaptation will become disproportionately high. Adaptation measures will therefore not be sufficient to protect citizens against the aforementioned consequences in the long term. The only effective remedy against hazardous climate change is to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. Therefore, the court arrives at the opinion that from the viewpoint of efficient measures available the State has limited options: mitigation is vital for preventing dangerous climate change.

4.76.  The State’s options are limited further by the private-law principles applicable to the State and mentioned above. After all, these principles were developed in response to the special risk of climate change and therefore limit the State’s options. This also applies, for instance, to the circumstance that Annex I countries, including the Netherlands, have taken the lead in taking mitigation measures and have therefore committed to a more than proportional contribution to reduction, in view of a fair distribution between industrialised and developing countries. Due to this principle of fairness, the State, in choosing measures, will also have to take account of the fact that the costs are to be distributed reasonably between the current and future generations. If according to the current insights it turns out to be cheaper on balance to act now, the State has a serious obligation, arising from due care, towards future generations to act accordingly. Moreover, the State cannot postpone taking precautionary measures based on the sole reason that there is no scientific certainty yet about the precise effect of the measures. However, a costbenefit ratio is allowed here. Finally, the State will have to base its actions on the principle of “prevention is better than cure”.

4.77.  To all these principles it applies that if the State wants to deviate from them, it will have to argue and prove sufficient justification for the deviation. A justification could be the costs. The State should not be expected to do the impossible nor may a disproportionately high burden be placed on it. However, as has been considered above, it has neither been argued, nor has it become evident that the State has insufficient financial means to realise higher reduction measures. It can also not be concluded that from a macro economic point of view there are obstructions to choosing a higher emission reduction level for 2020.

4.78.  The State has argued that allowing Urgenda’s claim, which is aimed at a higher reduction of greenhouse gas emission in the Netherlands, would not be effective on a global scale, as such a target would result in a very minor, if not negligible, reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions. After all, whether or not the 2°C target is achieved will mainly depend on the reduction targets of other countries with high emissions. More specifically, the States relies on the fact that the Dutch contribution to worldwide emissions is currently only 0.5%. If the reduction target of 25–40% from Urgenda’s claim were met the State argues that this would result in an additional reduction of 23.75 to 49.32 Mt CO2-eq (up to 2020), representing only 0.04–0.09% of global emissions. Starting from the idea that this additional reduction would hardly affect global emissions, the State argues that Urgenda has no interest in an allowance of its claim for additional reduction.

4.79.  This argument does not succeed. It is an established fact that climate change is a global problem and therefore requires global accountability. It follows from the UNEP report that based on the reduction commitments made in Cancun, a gap between the desired CO2 emissions (in order to reach the climate objective) and the actual emissions (14–17 Gt CO2 ) will have arisen by 2030. This means that more reduction measures have to be taken on an international level. It compels all countries, including the Netherlands, to implement the reduction measures to the fullest extent as possible. The fact that the amount of the Dutch emissions is small compared to other countries does not affect the obligation to take precautionary measures in view of the State’s obligation to exercise care. After all, it has been established that any anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission, no matter how minor, contributes to an increase of CO2 levels in the atmosphere and therefore to hazardous climate change. Emission reduction therefore concerns both a joint and individual responsibility of the signatories to the UN Climate Change Convention. In view of the fact that the Dutch emission reduction is determined by the State, it may not reject possible liability by stating that its contribution is minor, as also adjudicated mutatis mutandis in the Potash mines ruling of the Dutch Supreme Court (HR 23 September 1988, NJ 1989, 743). The rules given in that ruling also apply, by analogy, to the obligation to take precautionary measures in order to avert a danger which is also the subject of this case. Therefore, the court arrives at the opinion that the single circumstance that the Dutch emissions only constitute a minor contribution to global emissions does not alter the State’s obligation to exercise care towards third parties. Here too, the court takes into account that in view of a fair distribution the Netherlands, like the other Annex I countries, has taken the lead in taking mitigation measures and has therefore committed to a more than proportionte contribution to reduction. Moreover, it is beyond dispute that the Dutch per capita emissions are one of the highest in the world.

4.80.  Finally, the State has put forward that higher emission reductions in the ETS sector are not allowed. In support of this argument, the State has referred to the emission ceiling for the ETS sector as adopted by the EU, which is intended to have led to an EU-wide emission reduction of 21% by 2020, compared to 2005. In view of this ceiling and of the principles of EU law laid down in the TFEU, the State argues that it is not possible to impose a stricter (or less strict) reduction target of over 21% on ETS businesses established in the Netherlands. In so far as the State hereby argues that in allocating the emission allowances (emission allocation) among the ETS businesses the State should act in accordance with EU legislation and observe the ceiling stated therein, then this is correct. However, the court does not follow the State in this argument in so far as this means that a Member State is not allowed to reduce more than the amount adopted in EU policy. As has been stated previously, the State has determined a higher reduction target for the period up to 2010, namely 30%. Urgenda was right in arguing that regardless of the ceiling Member States have the option to influence (directly or indirectly) the greenhouse gas emissions of national ETS businesses by taking own, national measures. In its argument, Urgenda has named several of such measures taken in other Member States, such as increasing the share of sustainable energy in the national electricity network in Denmark and the introduction of the carbon price floor taks in the United Kingdom, with which the price of CO2 emission has been increased. In response to Urgenda’s argument, the State acknowledged in a more general sense that it is legally and practically possible to develop a national ETS sector policy that is more farreaching than the EU’s policy.

4.81.  It is of the opinion of the court that the European legislation discussed here does not prevent the State from pursuing a higher reduction for 2020. The court also does not follow the State’s argument that other European countries will neutralise reduced emissions in the Netherlands, and that greenhouse gas emission in the EU as a whole will therefore not decrease. The phenomenon the State refers to and which could occur at various levels (between countries, but also between provinces, regions or on a global scale) and which could have various causes, is also known as the “waterbed effect” or “carbon leakage”. AR5/2013 describes research results from 2012, which show that a mean 12% of carbon losses will have to be taken into account. The accompanying document to the announcement of the European Commission of 22 January 2014 (“summary of the effect assessment”) referred to in 2.66 states that “so far there have been no signs” of carbon leakage. In view of this, it cannot be maintained that extra reduction efforts of the State would be without substantial influence.

4.82.  In so far as the State argues that a higher reduction path will decrease the “level playing field” for Dutch businesses, it failed to provide adequate explanations or supporting documents. This road would have been open to the State, as the Parties agree that some of the countries neighbouring the Netherlands have implemented a stricter national climate policy (United Kingdom, Denmark and Sweden) and as there are no indications that this has created an unlevel “playing field” for business in those countries. It is furthermore unclear which businesses the State is referring to: the climate policy can have a negative effect on one sector, while it can also have a positive effect on another sector. It is also unclear if and if so, to what extent, on a global level a stricter climate policy in the Netherlands will have any sort of effect on the position of businesses (including multinationals) compared tot heir nationally and internationally operating competitors. This argument is therefore rejected.

Conclusion about the duty of care and determining the reduction target

4.83.  Due to the severity of the consequences of climate change and the great risk of hazardous climate change occurring — without mitigating measures — the court concludes that the State has a duty of care to take mitigation measures. The circumstance that the Dutch contribution to the present global greenhouse gas emissions is currently small does not affect this. Now that at least the 450 scenario is required to prevent hazardous climate change, the Netherlands must take reduction measures in support of this scenario.

4.84.  It is an established fact that with the current emission reduction policy of 20% at most in an EU context (about 17% in the Netherlands) for the year 2020, the State does not meet the standard which according to the latest scientific knowledge and in the international climate policy is required for Annex I countries to meet the 2°C target.

4.85.  Urgenda is correct in arguing that the postponement of mitigation efforts, as currently supported by the State (less strict reduction between the present day and 2030 and a significant reduction as of 2030), will cause a cumulation effect, which will result in higher levels of CO2 in the atmosphere in comparison to a more even procentual or linear decrease of emissions starting today. A higher reduction target for 2020 (40%, 30% or 25%) will cause lower total, cumulated greenhouse gas emissions across a longer period of time in comparison with the target of less than 20% chosen by the State. The court agrees with Urgenda that by choosing this reduction path, even though it is also aimed at realising the 2°C target, will in fact make significant contributions to the risk of hazardous climate change and can therefore not be deemed as a sufficient and acceptable alternative to the scientifically proven and acknowledged higher reduction path of 25–40% in 2020.

4.86.  This would only be different if the reduction target of 25–40% was so disproportionately burdensome for the Netherlands (economically) or for the State (due to its limited financial means) that this target should be deviated from to prevent a great potential danger. However, the State did not argue that this is the case. On the contrary: the State also argues that a higher reduction target is one of the possibilities. This leads the court to the conclusion regarding this issue of the dispute that the State, given the limitation of its discretionary power discussed here, in case of a reduction below 25–40% fails to fulfil its duty of care and therefore acts unlawfully. Although it has been established that the State in the past committed to a 30% reduction target and it has not been established that this higher reduction target is not feasible, the court sees insufficient grounds to compel the State to adopt a higher level than the minimum level of 25%. According to the scientific standard, a reduction target of this magnitude is the absolute minimum and sufficiently effective, for the Netherlands, to avert the danger of hazardous climate change, but the obligation to adhere to a higher percentage clashes with the discretionary power vested in the State, also with due regard for the limitation discussed here.

Attributability

4.87.  From the aforementioned considerations regarding the nature of the act (which includes the omission) of the government it ensues that the excess greenhouse gas emission in the Netherlands that will occur between the present time and 2020 without further measures, can be attributed to the State. After all, the State has the power to issue rules or other measures, including community information, to promote the transition to a sustainable society and to reduce greenhouse gas emission in the Netherlands.

Damages

4.88.  The State has argued that an allowance of one of Urgenda’s claims, although it requests preventative legal protection, there is at least the possibility of damages in the form of a decrease in assets or loss of benefits. Although the State acknowledges that it is not required for damages to actually have been incurred, the State believes that it has to be established that Urgenda’s interests are concretely at risk of being affected. The State also argues that it is insufficient that there is a risk in abstract terms or that there is a chance that anywhere in the world a risk of loss will occur for anyone. Urgenda has responded by stating that it has a sufficiently concrete interest.

4.89.  The court finds as follows. It is an established fact that climate change is occurring partly due to the Dutch greenhouse gas emissions. It is also an established fact that the negative consequences are currently being experienced in the Netherlands, such as heavy precipitation, and that adaptation measures are already being taken to make the Netherlands “climate-proof”. Moreover, it is established that if the global emissions, partly caused by the Netherlands, do not decrease substantially, hazardous climate change will probably occur. In the opinion of the court, the possibility of damages for those whose interests Urgenda represents, including current and future generations of Dutch nationals, is so great and concrete that given its duty of care, the State must make an adequate contribution, greater than its current contribution, to prevent hazardous climate change.

Causal link

4.90.  From the above considerations, particularly in 4.79, it follows that a sufficient causal link can be assumed to exist between the Dutch greenhouse gas emissions, global climate change and the effects (now and in the future) on the Dutch living climate. The fact that the current Dutch greenhouse gas emissions are limited on a global scale does not alter the fact that these emission contribute to climate change. The court has taken into consideration in this respect as well that the Dutch greenhouse emissions have contributed to climate change and by their nature will also continue to contribute to climate change.

Relativity

4.91.  The government’s care for a safe living climate at least extends across Dutch territory. In view of the fact that Urgenda also promotes the interests of persons living on this territory now and in the future, the court has arrived at the opinion that the breached security standard — exercising due care in combating climate change — also extends to combating possible damages incurred by Urgenda as a result of this, thereby meeting the so-called relativity requirement.

4.92.  No decision needs to be made on whether Urgenda’s reduction claim can als be successful in so far as it also promotes the rights and interests of current and future generations from other countries. After all, Urgenda is not required to actually serve that wide “support base” to be successful in that claim, as the State’s unlawful acts towards the current or future population of the Netherlands is sufficient.

Conclusion regarding the State’s legal obligation

4.93.  Based on the foregoing, the court concludes that the State — apart from the defence to be discussed below — has acted negligently and therefore unlawfully towards Urgenda by starting from a reduction target for 2020 of less than 25% compared to the year 1990.

E.  The system of separation of powers

4.94.  The main point of this dispute concerns if allowing Urgenda’s main claim — an order for the State to limit greenhouse gas emissions further than it has currently planned —would constitute an interference with the distribution of powers in our democratic system. Urgenda has answered this question in the negative and the State, relying on the trias politica, has arrived at an opposing viewpoint.

4.95.  The court states first and foremost that Dutch law does not have a full separation of state powers, in this case, between the executive and judiciary. The distribution of powers between these powers (and the legislature) is rather intended to establish a balance between these state powers. This does not mean that the one power in a general sense has primacy over the other power. It does mean that each state power has its own task and responsibilities. The court provides legal protection and settles legal disputes, which it must to do this if requested to do so. It is an essential feature of the rule of law that the actions of (independent, democratic, legitimised and controlled) political bodies, such as the government and parliament can — and sometimes must — be assessed by an independent court. This constitutes a review of lawfulness. The court does not enter the political domain with the associated considerations and choices. Separate from any political agenda, the court has to limit itself to its own domain, which is the application of law. Depending on the issues and claims submitted to it, the court will review them with more or less caution. Great restraint or even abstinence is required when it concerns policy-related considerations of ranging interests which impact the structure or organisation of society. The court has to be aware that it only plays one of the roles in a legal dispute between two or more parties. Government authorities, such as the State (with bodies such as the government and the States-General), have to make a general consideration, with due regard for possibly many more positions and interests.

4.96.  This distinctive difference between these state powers does not automatically provide an answer to the question how the court should decide if it finds that allowing a claim in a dispute between two parties has substantial consequences for third parties which are not part of the proceedings. A decision between two private parties in itself does not have consequences for the position of third parties, so that the position of these third parties does not need to be considered in principle. However, a claim seeking an order such as is the case here, in a case against central government, could have direct or indirect consequences for third parties. This prompts the court to exercise restraint in allowing such claims, all the more if the court does not have a clear picture of the magnitude and meaning of these consequences.

4.97.  It is worthwhile noting that a judge, although not elected and therefore has no democratic legitimacy, has democratic legitimacy in another — but vital — respect. His authority and ensuing “power” are based on democratically established legislation, whether national or international, which has assigned him the task of settling legal disputes. This task also extends to cases in which citizens, individually or collectively, have turned against government authorities. The task of providing legal protection from government authorities, such as the State, pre-eminently belong to the domain of a judge. This task is also enshrined in legislation.

4.98.  In a general sense, given the grounds put forward by Urgenda, the claim does not fall outside the scope of the court’s domain. The claim essentially concerns legal protection and therefore requires a “judicial review”. This does not mean that allowing one or more components of the claim can also have political consequences and in that respect can affect political decision-making. However, this is inherent in the role of the court with respect to government authorities in a state under the rule of law. The possibility — and in this case even certainty — that the issue is also and mainly the subject of political decision-making is no reason for curbing the judge in his task and authority to settle disputes. Whether or not there is a “political support base” for the outcome is not relevant in the court’s decision-making process. This does not mean that the requirement of restraint referred to above applies in full to judgments with unforeseaable or difficult to assess consequences for third parties.

4.99.  The court has also established that the State has failed to argue that it does not have the possibility, at law or effectively, to take measures that go further than those in the current national climate policy. The follows from the fact that the EU is willing to pursue furtherreaching targets if other countries do more than currently can be expected. Nor has the State argued that the court should apply equally Book 6, Section 168, subsection 1 of the Dutch Civil Code, which offers the court the option to reject a claim intended to prohibit an wrongful conduct based on the fact that this conduct should be tolerated due to compelling social interests. The court is of the opinion that the opposite has occurred in this case, namely that based on the facts agreed between the Parties the State must take further-reaching measures to realise the 2° target.

4.100.  It deserves separate discussion that climate policy is to a great extent adopted in an international context, although it can also be established at state level. The State has put forward that allowing the claim regarding the reduction order would damage the Netherlands’ negotiation position at, for instance, the conference in Paris in late 2015. In the opinion of the court, this does not have independent significance in the sense that — if the court rules that the law obliges the State towards Urgenda to realise a certain target — the government is not free to disregard that obligation in the context of international negotiations. However, it applies here too that the court should exercise restraint given the possibility that the consequences of the court’s intervention are difficult to assess.

4.101.  In this, it is relevant to note that the claim discussed here is not intended to order or prohibit the State from taking certain legislative measures or adopting a certain policy. If the claim is allowed, the State will retain full freedom, which is pre-eminently vested in it, to determine how to comply with the order concerned. The court has also taken into account here that the State has failed to argue that he is actually incapable of executing the order. The State has also failed to argue here that other, fundamental interests it is expected to promote would be damaged.

4.102.  The court has arrived at the conclusion regarding the issue discussed here that the aspects associated with the trias politica in general do not constitute an obstacle to allowing one or more components of the claim, particularly those related to ordering the reduction concerned. The restraint which the court should exercise does not result in a further limitation than that ensuing from the State’s discretionary power, discussed previously.

F.  Consequences of the foregoing for components of the claim

The reduction order

4.103.  The essence of Urgenda’s claim is formed by that which has been discussed on numerous occasion in section 7. Based on all the above, this component in its primary form is allowable, with the proviso that for an order that goes beyong the 25% reduction, there is insufficient grounds for the lower limit of the 25–40% bandwidth. The rest of this component of the claim is hereby rejected.

Declaratory decisions

4.104.  Urgenda initially claimed that the court should order the State to pursue an emission reduction of 40%, or at least 25%, as of end 2020 compared to 1990 and to rule that the State acts unlawfully if it fails to pursues that reduction. Urgenda changed its claim in its reply, explaining among other things that it realises that the claim concerning the order is “a tall order”. The change of the claim provides for various declaratory decisions dealing with subissues which the court is already supposed to answer “working up” to the assessment of the claim regarding the reduction order. In its reply, Urgenda answered the court’s question in the affirmative whether these declaratory decisions would be “available separately”, meaning: apart from the reduction order in case the order is not allowable. In this context, Urgenda has argued that it attaches importance to the separate declaratory decisions, as they could contribute to realising its objectives. Urgenda also believes they could create a support base and initiate a discussion. Moreover, the declaratory decisions also serve the interest of emotional redress. At the hearing, Urgenda also repeated that the declaratory decisions can be viewed as the steps the court has to take to arrive at the reduction order.

4.105.  Since the court deems the reduction order allowable in the aforementioned manner, the court is of the opinion that Urgenda does not have sufficient interest in allowing the declaratory decisions under 1–6 in 3.1. Partly in view of Urgenda explanation paraphrased above, the court fails to see how the remaining declaratory decisions could add to Urgenda’s primary objective and the result it has already obtained. The State’s objections to these components therefore do not need to be discussed.

The information order

4.106.  Regarding the other claim, the order to the State to inform Dutch society in the manner ordered in Urgenda’s claim, the court finds as follows. In Urgenda’s vision, the State contributes to issuing false community information about the severity and urgency of the climate problems, thereby hindering Urgenda in realising its objectives. In view of the fact that Urgenda has argued — uncontested by the State — that allowing the claim could contribute to realising its objectives, or at least could contribute to creating a support base for these objectives or to initiating a discussion about the subject, Urgenda has proved to have sufficient interest in the relevant components of the claim.

4.107.  However, these components are not allowable on substantive grounds. The State can be expected to adequately inform society about the climate policy to be pursued by it, in line with the court’s ruling in this case. However, there is no legal rule that prescribes for cases such as these that the State has to issue a public statement or warning with a contents “dictated” by Urgenda, while it is still entirely unclear which measures the States will take. The manner in which the State chooses to inform society about the risks of climate change and the climate policy to be pursued — within the bounds of law — is entirely at the sole discretion of the State. There is no cause for assuming beforehand that the State will not find an appropriate way of informing society, within these margins. This means that the court has no role to play here.

G.  Urgenda’s standing (acting on behalf of the principles)

4.108.  As announced in 4.10, the court now comes back to the position of the 886 principles whose interests Urgenda also promotes.

4.109.  In 4.45 and 4.46, the court considered that Urgenda itself cannot rely on Articles 2 and 8 ECHR, but that these treaty obligations have contributed to the detailing of the standard of care under Book 6, Section 162 of the Dutch Civil Code invoke by Urgenda towards the State. In its argument put forward at the hearing Urgenda stated that regarding the claim which is based on Articles 2 and 8 ECHR, the position of the individual claimants (its principals) is “possibly stronger” than its own position. The court currently does not have sufficient details about the individual claimants to be able to determine that this interest indeed exists. Even if it is assumed that the individual claimants can rely on Articles 2 and 8 ECHR, their claims cannot lead to a decision other than the one on which Urgenda can rely for itself. In this situation, the court finds that the individual claimants do not have sufficient (own) interests besides Urgenda’s interest. Partly in view of practical grounds, this had led the court to reject the claim in so far as it has been instituted on behalf of the claimants. The question of locus standi can therefore be left unanswered.

H.  Costs of the proceeding

4.110.  Regarding the key point of these proceedings, the order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Urgenda has mainly succeeded in its action. From this it follows that the State must be ordered to pay the costs of the proceedings incurred by Urgenda. In estimating the these costs, the court deviates from the usual fixed rate for a claim for “an unspecified amount”, such as the one discussed here, namely € 452 allocated per component. However, as this is an exceptional case — exceptional in the sense of complicated subject matter and the major social and financial interests involved — the court deems the maximum fixed rate of € 3,210 per component appropriate. Urgenda’s lawyer’s fee is therefore assessed at € 12,840 (four components of € 3,210 each). Urgenda’s disbursements total € 681.82 (€ 92.82 incl. VAT for the costs of the summons and € 589 in court fees). The State is hereby ordered to pay € 13,521.82 in costs of the proceedings incurred by Urgenda, plus statutory interest as claimed. There are no grounds for an order to pay subsequent costs, as the cost award is also enforceable for the subsequent costs. The court sees no ground for a cost award for the individual claimants on whose behalf Urgenda acts. This results in the below-mentioned ruling regarding this point.

The ruling

The court:

5.1.  orders the State to limit the joint volume of Dutch annual greenhouse gas emissions, or have them limited, so that this volume will have reduced by at least 25% at the end of 2020 compared to the level of the year 1990, as claimed by Urgenda, in so far as acting on its own behalf;

5.2.  orders the State to pay the costs of the proceedings incurred by Urgenda (acting on its own behalf) and estimates these costs at € 13,521.82, plus statutory interest, as from fourteen days following this judgment;

5.3.  declares this judgment provisionally enforceable to this extent;

5.4.  compensates the other costs of the proceedings, in the sense that the Parties bear their own costs to this extent;

5.5.  rejects all other claims.

This judgment was passed by mr. H.F.M. Hofhuis, mr. J.W. Bockwinkel and mr. I. Brand and pronounced in open court on 24 June 2015.27

Decision - full text

De procedure

1.1.  Het verloop van de procedure blijkt uit:

  • —  de dagvaarding, met de producties 1–51,

  • —  de conclusie van antwoord, met de producties 1–15,

  • —  de conclusie van repliek tevens wijziging van eis, met de producties 52–98,

  • —  de conclusie van dupliek, met de producties 16–29,

  • —  de akte overlegging producties 99–103 van de zijde van Urgenda,

  • —  het proces-verbaal van de zitting van 14 april 2015, met de daarin vermelde stukken,

  • —  de brieven van 30 april en 11 mei 2015 van mr. Brans en van 6 en 12 mei 2015 van mr. Cox, met opmerkingen naar aanleiding van het proces-verbaal,

  • —  de brief van 13 mei 2015 van de griffie van de rechtbank aan partijen.

1.2.  De rechtbank zal het proces-verbaal van de zitting van 14 april 2015 lezen met inachtneming van de opmerking van de Staat in zijn brief van 30 april 2015 en de opmerking van Urgenda in haar brief van 6 mei 2015 met betrekking tot een naamsvermelding. In de overige opmerkingen van Urgenda ziet de rechtbank, mede gelet op de reactie van de Staat daarop, onvoldoende reden om het proces-verbaal aan te passen. Daarbij verdient vermelding dat het proces-verbaal slechts een verkorte weergave vormt van het besprokene ter zitting of van hetgeen de rechtbank daaruit heeft afgeleid.

1.3.  Aan het einde van de zitting is het vonnis bepaald op heden.

De feiten

A.  De partijen

2.1.  Urgenda (een samentrekking van “urgente agenda”) is ontstaan vanuit het Dutch Research Institute for Transitions aan de Erasmus Universiteit te Rotterdam, een instituut voor de transitie naar een duurzame samenleving. Urgenda is een burgerplatform met leden afkomstig uit diverse domeinen in de samenleving, zoals het bedrijfsleven, de mediacommunicatie, kennisinstellingen, de overheid en non-gouvernementele organisaties. Het platform houdt zich bezig met de ontwikkeling van plannen en maatregelen ter voorkoming van klimaatverandering.

2.2.  Urgenda is opgericht bij notariële akte van 17 januari 2008. Artikel 2 van de statuten (“doel en grondslag”) luidt als volgt:

  1. 1.  Het doel van de Stichting is het stimuleren en versnellen van transitieprocessen naar een duurzamere samenleving, te starten in Nederland.

  2. 2.  De Stichting wil dit doel onder meer bereiken door:

    1. a.  een duurzaamheids platform op te richten dat een visie voor een duurzaam Nederland in het jaar tweeduizend vijftig (2050) ontwikkelt, als motiverend wenkend perspectief voor allen die aan duurzaamheid werken;

    2. b.  organisaties en initiatieven die zich bezig houden met duurzaamheid in kaart brengen en met elkaar te verbinden tot een duurzaamheids beweging;

    3. c.  een actieplan voor de komende vijftig (50) jaar op te stellen en met partners uit de samenleving uit te voeren;

    4. d.  het initiëren, stimuleren en begeleiden van Icoonprojecten en regionale duurzaamheids projecten die de doelstellingen van Urgenda onderschrijven en die dienen als communicatiemiddel om derden te laten zien wat duurzaamheid in de praktijk betekent.”

2.3.  Voor de betekenis van het begrip “duurzaamheid” in haar statuten verwijst Urgenda naar de definitie van duurzame ontwikkeling (“sustainable development”) in het rapport “Our Common Future” uit 1987 van de World Commission on Environment and Development van de Verenigde Naties (VN), ook wel bekend als het Brundtland-rapport, die luidt:

“Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

2.4.  Urgenda treedt in deze procedure mede op namens 886 individuele personen, die haar hebben gemachtigd deze procedure ook namens hen te voeren.

2.5.  Het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu, als onderdeel van de Staat, is (onder meer) verantwoordelijk voor de zorg voor een gezonde en veilige leefomgeving, het beheer van schaarse hulpbronnen en milieuruimte en de ontwikkeling van Nederland als een veilige, leefbare, bereikbare en concurrerende delta.

B.  De aanleiding tot deze procedure

2.6.  Met een brief van 12 november 2012 aan de minister-president heeft Urgenda de Staat verzocht toe te zeggen en zich te verplichten om de Nederlandse CO2-uitstoot per 2020 te reduceren met 40% ten opzichte van de uitstoot per 1990.

2.7.  Met een brief van 11 december 2012 heeft de staatssecretaris van Infrastructuur en Milieu hierop onder meer het volgende geantwoord:

“Ik deel zowel uw zorgen over het uitblijven van voldoende internationale actie als uw zorg dat de omvang van het probleem en de urgentie van een succesvolle aanpak in het maatschappelijk debat onvoldoende voelbaar zijn (…).

Het belangrijkste is dat er eindelijk een stabiel en breed gedragen beleidskader komt dat tot voldoende actie leidt om het lange termijn perspectief van 80 tot 95 procent CO2-reductie in 2050 binnen bereik te houden (…)

Duidelijk is ook dat er collectieve, mondiale actie vereist is om klimaatverandering binnen acceptabele grenzen te houden. In die context van collectieve actie is de 25–40 procent reductie waarnaar u in uw brief verwijst altijd bedoeld. Het aanbod van de EU om onder voorwaarde van vergelijkbare reducties van andere landen 30 procent te reduceren in 2020 valt binnen die range. Het is een groot probleem dat de collectieve, mondiale inspanningen op dit moment nog te kort schieten om zicht te houden op het beperken van de gemiddelde wereldwijde temperatuurstijging tot 2 graden. Ik ga samen met nationale en internationale partners initiatieven lanceren en ondersteunen om daar iets aan te doen (…).

C.  Wetenschappelijke organisaties en publicaties

IPCC

2.8.  Het Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is een wetenschappelijk orgaan, opgericht in 1988 door het United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) en de World Meteorological Organization (WMO) onder auspiciën van de VN. Het IPCC richt zich op het verkrijgen van inzicht in alle aspecten van klimaatverandering, zoals de risico’s, de gevolgen en de mogelijkheden tot adaptatie en mitigatie. Met mitigatie (terugdringing van het probleem) wordt beoogd verdere klimaatverandering te voorkomen dan wel te beperken. Met adaptatie (aanpassing aan de gevolgen) wordt geprobeerd de natuur, de maatschappij en de economie minder kwetsbaar te maken voor een veranderend klimaat. Het IPCC verricht niet zelf onderzoek en houdt ook geen klimaatgerelateerde gegevens bij, maar bestudeert en beoordeelt de meest recente wetenschappelijke, technische en sociaaleconomische informatie die wereldwijd geproduceerd wordt en rapporteert daarover.

2.9.  Het IPCC is niet alleen een wetenschappelijke, maar ook een intergouvernementele organisatie. Het lidmaatschap staat open voor alle staten die lid zijn van de VN en de WMO. Op dit moment zijn 195 landen, waaronder Nederland, lid van het IPCC.

2.10.  Bij de oprichting is het IPCC in drie werkgroepen ingedeeld. Deze werkgroepen hebben tot taak de volgende onderwerpen in kaart te brengen:

  • Werkgroep I: bestaande wetenschappelijke kennis over het klimaatsysteem en de klimaatverandering;

  • Werkgroep II: de gevolgen van de klimaatverandering voor het milieu, de economie en de samenleving;

  • Werkgroep III: de mogelijke strategieën in antwoord op deze veranderingen.

2.11.  Sinds de oprichting heeft het IPCC vijf rapporten (elk bestaande uit vier deelrapporten) uitgebracht. Voor deze procedure zijn de meest recente rapporten relevant: het “Fourth Assessment Report” uit 2007 (hierna: AR4/2007) en het “Fifth Assessment Report” uit 2013/2014 (hierna: AR5/2013).

AR4/2007

2.12.  In dit rapport heeft het IPCC — voor zover thans nog van belang — vastgesteld dat bij een mondiale temperatuurstijging van 2 °C boven het pre-industriële niveau (tot het jaar 1850) het risico ontstaat op een gevaarlijke, onomkeerbare verandering van het klimaat:1

“Confidence has increased that a 1 to 2o C increase in global mean temperature above 1990 levels (about 1.5 to 2.5o C above pre-industrial) poses significant risks to many unique and threatened systems including many biodiversity hotspots.”

2.13.  In dit rapport heeft het IPCC aan de hand van de hieronder staande tabel inzicht geboden in de mogelijkheden om de grens van 2 °C niet te overschrijden.2 Het heeft hiertoe een overzicht gegeven van het verband tussen verschillende emissiescenario’s, stabilisatiedoelen en temperatuurverandering. Daarbij is rekening gehouden met een klimaatgevoeligheid van waarschijnlijk ( >66%) 2–4,5 °C. De “klimaatgevoeligheid” geeft de mate weer waarin de temperatuur naar verwachting zal reageren op een verdubbeling van de CO2-concentratie in de atmosfeer. In het rapport is vervolgens gerekend met een “best estimate” klimaatgevoeligheid van 3 °C.

Table 3.10:  Properties of emissions pathways for alternative ranges of C02 and C02-eq stabilization targets. Post-TAR stabilization scenarios in the scenario database (see also Sections 3.2 and 3.3); data source: after Nakicenovic et al., 2006 and Hanaoka et al., 2006)

Class

Anthropogenic addition to radiative forcing at stabilization (Wim2)

Multi-gas concentration level (ppmv C02-eq)

Stabilization level for C02 only, consistent with multi-gas level (ppmv C02)

Number of scenario studies

Global mean temperature C increase above pre-industrial at equilibrium, using best estimate of climate sensitivity c)

Likely range of global mean temperature C increase above pre-industrial at equilibrium a)

Peaking year for C02 emissions b)

Change in global emissions in 2050 (% of 2000 Class emissions) b)

2.5–3.0

445–490

350–400

6

2.0–2.4

1.4–3.6

2000-

-85 to -50

II

3.0–3.5

490–535

400–440

18

2.4–2.8

1.6–4.2

2015

-60 to -30

III

3.5–4.0

535–590

440–485

21

2.8–3.2

1.9–4.9

2000-

-30 to +5

IV

4.0–5.0

590–710

485–570

118

3.2–4.0

2.2–6.1

2020

+10 to

V

5.0–6.0

710–855

570–660

9

4.0–4.9

2.7–7.3

2010-

+60

VI

6.0–7.5

855–1130

660–790

5

4.9–6.1

3.2–8.5

2030

+25 to

2020-

+85

2060

+90 to

2050-

+140

2080

2060-

2090

Notes:

a.  Warming for each stabilization class is calculated based on the variation of climate sensitivity between 2°C –4.5°C, which corresponds to the likely range of climate sensitivity as defined by Meehl et al. (2007,Chapter 10).

b.  Ranges correspond to the 70% percentile of the post-TAR scenario distribution.

c.  ‘Best estimate’ refers to the most likely value of climate sensitivity, i.e. the mode (sea Meehl et al. (2007, Chapter 10) and Table 3.9.”

2.14.  Uit deze tabel (achter I) blijkt dat om de temperatuurstijging te beperken tot 2-2,4 °C de concentratie van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer dient te stabiliseren op een niveau van 445–490 ppmv (parts per million by volume) CO2-eq (CO2 en andere antropogene broeikasgassen). Met deze eenheid, die hierna verkort wordt weergegeven als “ppm”, wordt de concentratie van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer aangeduid. Volgens het rapport kan, uitgaande van een klimaatgevoeligheid van 3 °C, een temperatuurstijging van niet meer dan 2 °C alleen worden bereikt wanneer de concentratie van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer stabiliseert op ongeveer 450 ppm:3

“This ‘best estimate’ assumption shows that the most stringent (category I) scenarios could limit global mean temperature increases to 2°C–2.4°C above pre-industrial levels, at equilibrium, requiring emissions to peak within 10 years. Similarly, limiting temperature increases to 2°C above pre-industrial levels can only be reached at the lowest end of the concentration interval found in the scenarios of category I (i.e. about 450 ppmv CO2-eq using ‘best estimate’ assumptions). By comparison, using the same ‘best estimate’ assumptions, category II scenarios could limit the increase to 2.8°C–3.2°C above pre-industrial levels at equilibrium, requiring emissions to peak within the next 25 years, whilst category IV scenarios could limit the increase to 3.2°C–4°C above pre-industrial at equilibrium requiring emissions to peak within the next 55 years. Note that Table 3.10 category IV scenarios could result in temperature increases as high as 6.1°C above pre-industrial levels, when the likely range for the value of climate sensitivity is taken into account.”

2.15.  Het IPCC is na analyse van verschillende scenario’s over de vraag welke uitstootreducties nodig zijn om bepaalde klimaatdoelstellingen te halen, tot de conclusie gekomen dat voor het bereiken van een concentratieniveau van maximaal 450 ppm, de totale uitstoot van broeikasgassen door de Annex I-landen (waaronder Nederland zoals hierna zal worden toegelicht) in 2020 25 tot 40% lager moet zijn dan de uitstoot in 1990. In 2050 dient bij dit scenario de totale uitstoot van deze landen met 80 tot 95% ten opzichte van 1990 te zijn teruggebracht. Zie de volgende tabel.4

Box 13.7  The range of the difference between emissions in 1990 and emission allowances in 2020/2050 for various GHG [Greenhouse Gasses; toevoeging rechtbank] concentration levels for Annex I and non-Annex I countries as a groupa

Scenario category

Region

2020

2050

A-450 ppm CO2-eqb

Annex I

-25% to -40%

-80% to -95%

Non-Annex I

Substantial deviation from baseline in Latin America, Middle East, East Asia and Centrally-Planned Asia

Substantial deviation from baseline in all regions

B-550 ppm CO2-eq

Annex I

-10% to -30%

-40% to -90%

Non-Annex I

Deviation from baseline in Latin America and Middle East, East Asia

Deviation from baseline in most regions, especially in Latin America and Middle East

C-650 ppm CO2-eq

Annex I

0% to -25%

-30% to -80%

Non-Annex I

Baseline

Deviation from baseline in Latin America and Middle East, East Asia

Notes:

The aggregate range is based on multiple approaches to apportion emissions between regions (contraction and convergence, multistage, Triptych and intensity targets, among others). Each approach makes different assumptions about the pathway, specific national efforts and other variables. Additional extreme cases — in which Annex I undertakes all reductions, or non-Annex I undertakes all reductions — are not included. The ranges presented here do not imply political feasibility, nor do the results reflect cost variances.

Only the studies aiming at stabilization at 450 ppm CO2-eq assume a (temporary) overshoot of about 50 ppm (See Den Elzen and Meinshausen, 2006). (…)”

2.16.  Een met de tabel in 2.13 vergelijkbare tabel is opgenomen in de Technical Summary van de bijdrage van Werkgroep III aan AR4/2007 (p. 39). Daarin is verder vermeld (p. 90):

“Under most equity interpretations, developed countries as a group would need to reduce their emissions significantly by 2020 (10–40% below 1990 levels) and to still lower levels by 2050 (40–95% below 1990 levels) for low to medium stabilization levels (450–550ppm CO2-eq) (see also Chapter 3).”

Naar deze passages en de in 2.15 weergegeven tabel wordt in het hierna te bespreken Bali Action Plan verwezen.

2.17.  In het IPCC-rapport is ook vermeld dat mitigeren in de regel beter is dan adapteren:5

“Over the next 20 years or so, even the most aggressive climate policy can do little to avoid warming already ‘loaded’ into the climate system. The benefits of avoided climate change will only accrue beyond that time. Over longer time frames, beyond the next few decades, mitigation investments have a greater potential to avoid climate change damage and this potential is larger than the adaptation options that can currently be envisaged (medium agreement, medium evidence).”

AR5/2013

2.18.  In 2013–2014 heeft het IPCC zijn nieuwste inzichten in de omvang, de effecten en de oorzaken van de klimaatverandering kenbaar gemaakt. In het desbetreffende rapport (AR5/2013) heeft het IPCC, in overeenstemming met AR4/2007, vastgesteld dat de aarde opwarmt als gevolg van de hoge toename van de CO2-concentratie in de atmosfeer sinds het begin van de industriële revolutie (basisjaar 1850) en dat dit wordt veroorzaakt door menselijke activiteit, in het bijzonder door de verbranding van olie, gas, kolen en door ontbossing:6

“Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and since the 1950’s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millenia. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, sea level has risen, and the concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased. (…)

Each of the last three decades has been successively warmer at the Earth’s surface than any preceding decade since 1850 (…). In the Northern Hemisphere, 1983–2012 was likely the warmest 30-year period of the last 1400 years (medium confidence).

The globally averaged combined land and ocean surface temperature data as calculated by a linear trend, show a warming of 0.85 [0.65 to 1.06]° C, over the period 1880 to 2012, when multiple independently produced datasets exist. The total increase between the average of the 1850–1900 period and the 2003–2012 period is 0.78 [0.72 to 0.85]° C, based on the single longest dataset available.(…)

Human influence has been detected in warming of the atmosphere and the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, in global mean sea level rise, and in changes in some climate extremes (…). This evidence for human influence has grown since AR4. It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century.”

2.19.  In het rapport heeft het IPCC voorts geconcludeerd dat als de concentratie van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer in 2100 stabiliseert op ongeveer 450 ppm, er een kans van meer dan 66% bestaat dat de stijging van de mondiale temperatuur onder de 2 °C blijft. Om een concentratieniveau van 450 ppm in 2100 te bereiken dienen de mondiale broeikasgasemissies in 2050 40% tot 70% lager te zijn dan in het jaar 2010. In 2100 moet het totaal aan emissies zijn teruggebracht tot nul of zelfs negatief zijn (ten opzichte van het vergelijkingsjaar):7

“Mitigation scenarios in which it is likely that the temperature change caused by anthropogenic GHG emissions can be kept to less than 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels are characterized by atmospheric concentrations in 2100 of about 450 ppm CO2eq (high confidence). Mitigation scenarios reaching concentration levels of about 500 ppm CO2eq by 2100 are more likely than not to limit temperature change to less than 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels, unless they temporarily ‘overshoot’ concentration levels of roughly 530 ppm CO2eq before 2100, in which case they are about as likely as not to achieve that goal. Scenarios that reach 530 to 650 ppm CO2eq concentrations by 2100 are more unlikely than likely to keep temperature change below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels. Scenarios that exceed about 650 ppm CO2eq by 2100 are unlikely to limit temperature change to below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels. Mitigation scenarios in which temperature increase is more likely than not to be less than 1.5 °C relative to pre-industrial levels by 2100 are characterized by concentrations in 2100 of below 430 ppm CO2eq. Temperature peaks during the century and then declines in these scenarios. (…)

Scenarios reaching atmospheric concentration levels of about 450 ppm CO2eq by 2100 (consistent with a likely chance to keep temperature change below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels) include substantial cuts in anthropogenic GHG emissions by midcentury through large-scale changes in energy systems and potentially land use (high confidence). Scenarios reaching these concentrations by 2100 are characterized by lower global GHG emissions in 2050 than in 2010, 40 % to 70 % lower globally, and emissions levels near zero GtCO2eq or below in 2100. In scenarios reaching 500 ppm CO2eq by 2100, 2050 emissions levels are 25 % to 55 % lower than in 2010 globally. In scenarios reaching 550 ppm CO2eq, emissions in 2050 are from 5 % above 2010 levels to 45 % below 2010 levels globally (…). At the global level, scenarios reaching 450 ppm CO2eq are also characterized by more rapid improvements of energy efficiency, a tripling to nearly a quadrupling of the share of zero- and low-carbon energy supply from renewables, nuclear energy and fossil energy with carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), or bioenergy with CCS (BECCS) by the year 2050 (…). These scenarios describe a wide range of changes in land use, reflecting different assumptions about the scale of bioenergy production, afforestation, and reduced deforestation. All of these emissions, energy, and land-use changes vary across regions. Scenarios reaching higher concentrations include similar changes, but on a slower timescale. On the other hand, scenarios reaching lower concentrations require these changes on a faster timescale. (…)

Mitigation scenarios reaching about 450 ppm CO2eq in 2100 typically involve temporary overshoot of atmospheric concentrations, as do many scenarios reaching about 500 ppm to 550 ppm CO2eq in 2100. Depending on the level of the overshoot, overshoot scenarios typically rely on the availability and widespread deployment of BECCS and afforestation in the second half of the century. The availability and scale of these and other Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) technologies and methods are uncertain and CDR technologies and methods are, to varying degrees, associated with challenges and risks (high confidence) (…). CDR is also prevalent in many scenarios without overshoot to compensate for residual emissions from sectors where mitigation is more expensive. There is only limited evidence on the potential for large-scale deployment of BECCS, large-scale afforestation, and other CDR technologies and methods.

Estimated global GHG emissions levels in 2020 based on the Cancún Pledges are not consistent with cost effective long-term mitigation trajectories that are at least as likely as not to limit temperature change to 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels (2100 concentrations of about 450 and about 500 ppm CO2eq), but they do not preclude the option to meet that goal (high confidence). Meeting this goal would require further substantial reductions beyond 2020. The Cancún Pledges are broadly consistent with cost-effective scenarios that are likely to keep temperature change below 3 °C relative to pre-industrial levels. (…)

Delaying mitigation efforts beyond those in place today through 2030 is estimated to substantially increase the difficulty of the transition to low longer-term emissions levels and narrow the range of options consistent with maintaining temperature change below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels (high confidence). Cost-effective mitigation scenarios that make it at least as likely as not that temperature change will remain below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels (2100 concentrations between about 450 and 500 ppm CO2eq) are typically characterized by annual GHG emissions in 2030 of roughly between 30 GtCO2eq and 50 GtCO2eq (Figure SPM.5, left panel). Scenarios with annual GHG emissions above 55 GtCO2eq in 2030 are characterized by substantially higher rates of emissions reductions from 2030 to 2050 (…); much more rapid scale-up of low-carbon energy over this period (…); a larger reliance on CDR technologies in the long-term (…); and higher transitional and long-term economic impacts (…). Due to these increased mitigation challenges, many models with annual 2030 GHG emissions higher than 55 GtCO2eq could not produce scenarios reaching atmospheric concentration levels that make it as likely as not that temperature change will remain below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels.”

2.20.  Over de omvang van de uitstoot is het volgende opgemerkt:8

“Total anthropogenic GHG emissions have continued to increase over 1970 to 2010 with larger absolute decadal increases toward the end of this period (high confidence). Despite a growing number of climate change mitigation policies, annual GHG emissions grew on average by 1.0 gigatonne carbon dioxide equivalent (GtCO2eq) (2,2%) per year from 2000 to 2010 compared to 0.4 GtCO2eq (1,3%) per year from 1970 to 2000 (…). Total anthropogenic GHG emissions were the highest in human history from 2000 to 2010 and reached 49 (±4.5) GtCO2eq/yr in 2010. The global economic crisis 2007/2008 only temporarily reduced emissions.”

2.21.  Het IPCC verwacht dat als reductiemaatregelen uitblijven, de temperatuur op aarde in 2100 met 3,7 tot 4,8 °C zal zijn gestegen en dat in 2030 het niveau van 450 ppm zal zijn overschreden:9

“Without additional efforts to reduce GHG emissions beyond those in place today, emissions growth is expected to persist driven by growth in global population and economic activities. Baseline scenarios, those without additional mitigation, result in global mean surface temperature increases in 2100 from 3.7 °C to 4.8 °C compared to pre-industrial levels (…) (median values; the range is 2.5 °C to 7.8 °C when including climate uncertainty (…) (high confidence). The emission scenarios collected for this assessment represent full radiative forcing including GHGs, tropospheric ozone, aerosols and albedo change. Baseline scenarios (scenarios without explicit additional efforts to constrain emissions) exceed 450 parts per million (ppm) CO2eq by 2030 and reach CO2eq concentration levels between 750 and more than 1300 ppm CO2eq by 2100. This is similar to the range in atmospheric concentration levels between the RCP 6.0 and RCP 8.5 pathways in 2100. For comparison, the CO2eq concentration in 2011 is estimated to be 430 ppm (uncertainty range 340 – 520 ppm).”

PBL en KNMI

2.22.  Het Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving (PBL) is een nationaal onafhankelijk onderzoeksinstituut op het gebied van milieu, natuur en ruimte. Het verricht zijn onderzoek, gevraagd of ongevraagd, ten behoeve van politiek en bestuurlijk beleid. Het instituut, opgericht in 2008, maakt organisatorisch thans deel uit van het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu.

2.23.  Het KNMI is het bij wet ingestelde nationale instituut voor meteorologie en seismologie. Het instituut levert de best beschikbare informatie op het gebied van weer, klimaat en aardbevingen, ten behoeve van de veiligheid, bereikbaarheid, leefbaarheid en welvaart van Nederland. Het KNMI vertegenwoordigt Nederland onder andere in het IPCC.

2.24.  Zowel het PBL als het KNMI analyseren de resultaten van de IPCC-rapporten en rapporteren over de gevolgen van de IPCC-bevindingen voor Nederland.

EDGAR

2.25.  De Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) is een database waarin van elk land emissiegegevens worden verzameld aan de hand waarvan de wereldwijde uitstoot van broeikasgassen kan worden bepaald. EDGAR is een gezamenlijk project van de Europese Commissie en het PBL.

2.26.  Volgens de meest recente gegevens van EDGAR zijn wereldwijd en in Nederland de volgende hoeveelheden broeikasgassen uitgestoten:

Wereldwijd

1990 38.232.170,06 megaton (hierna: Mt) CO2-eq

2010 50.911.113,68 Mt CO2-eq

2012 53.526.302,83 Mt CO2-eq

Nederland

1990 224.468,09 Mt CO2-eq

2010 212.418,45 Mt CO2-eq

2012 195.873,76 Mt CO2-eq

2.27  In 2010 was het aandeel van Nederland in de wereldwijde uitstoot 0,42%. Het aandeel van China in dat jaar was 21,97 %, het aandeel van de Verenigde Staten 13,19%, het aandeel van het totaal van de EU (toen 27 landen) 9,5 %, van Brazilië 5,7%, van India 5,44 % en van Rusland 5,11%.

2.28.  Per hoofd van de bevolking was de uitstoot in Nederland in 2010 12,78 ton CO2-eq en in 2012 11,72 ton CO2-eq. In China was de uitstoot per hoofd van de bevolking in 2012 9,04 ton CO2-eq, in de Verenigde Staten 19,98 ton CO2-eq, in Brazilië 15,05 ton CO2-eq, in India 2,43 ton CO2-eq en in Rusland 19,58 ton CO2-eq.

UNEP

2.29.  Het (in 2.8 genoemde) UNEP rapporteert sinds 2010 jaarlijks over de “emissions gap”. Dit is het verschil tussen het gewenste emissieniveau in een bepaald jaar en het niveau dat in dat jaar te verwachten is op basis van de door de desbetreffende landen toegezegde reductiedoelstellingen.

2.30.  De “executive summary” van het Emissions Gap Report 2013 behelst onder meer:

“(…) This report confirms and strengthens the conclusions of the three previous analyses that current pledges and commitments fall short of that goal. It further says that, as emissions of greenhouse gases continue to rise rather than decline, it becomes less and less likely that emissions will be low enough by 2020 to be on a least-cost pathway towards meeting the 2° C target.

As a result, after 2020, the world will have to rely on more difficult, costlier and riskier means of meeting the target — the further from the least-cost level in 2020, the higher these costs and the greater the risks will be.

(…)

  1. 2.  What emission levels are anticipated for 2020?

    Global greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 are estimated at 59 GtCO2e per year under a businessasusual scenario. If implemented fully, pledges and commitments would reduce this by 3–7 GtCO2e per year (…).

  2. 3.  What is the latest estimate of the emissions gap in 2020?

    (…) Least-cost emission pathways consistent with a likely chance of keeping global mean temperature increases below 2° C compared to pre-industrial levels have a median level of 44 GtCO2e in 2020 (range: 38–47 GtCO2e). Assuming full implementation of the pledges, the emissions gap thus amounts to between 8–12 GtCO2e per year in 2020 (…).

  3. 6.  What are the implications of later action scenarios that still meet the 1.5° C and 2° C targets?

    Based on a much larger number of studies than in 2012, this update concludes that so-called later-action scenario’s have several implications compared to least cost scenario’s, including: (i) much higher rates of global emission reductions in the medium term; (ii) greater lock-in of carbon-intensive infrastructure; (iii) greater dependence of certain technologies in the medium-term; (iv) greater costs of mitigation in the medium- and long term, and greater risks of economic disruption; and (v) greater risks of failing to meet the 2°C target. For these reasons later-action scenarios may not be feasible in practise and, as a result, temperature targets could be missed.

    (…) although later-action scenarios might reach the same temperature targets as their least-cost counterparts, later-action scenarios pose greater risks of climate impacts for four reasons. First delaying action allows more greenhouse gases to build-up in the atmosphere in the near term, thereby increasing the risk that later emission reductions will be unable to compensate for this build up. Second, the risk of overshooting climate targets for both atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and global temperature increase is higher with later-action scenarios. Third, the near-term rate of temperature is higher, which implies greater near-term climate impacts. Lastly, when action is delayed, options to achieve stringent levels of climate protection are increasingly lost.”

2.31.  In hoofdstuk 2 van het rapport staat het volgende:

  1. 2.4.5  Pledged reduction effort by Annex I and non-Annex I countries

    For Annex I parties, total emissions as a group of countries for the four pledge cases are estimated to be 3–16 percent below 1990 levels in 2020. For non-Annex I parties, total emissions are estimated to be 7–9 percent lower than business-as-usual emissions. This implies that the aggregate Annex I countries’ emission goals fall short of reaching the 25–40 percent reduction by 2020, compared with 1990, suggested in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (…).”

2.32.  In het Emissions Gap Report 2014 is, anders dan in de voorgaande rapporten, de aandacht vooral gericht op het “carbon dioxide emissions budget”. Het UNEP concludeert dat om de doelstelling van een maximale wereldwijde temperatuurstijging van 2 °C boven het pre-industriële niveau (hierna: de tweegradendoelstelling) te kunnen behouden het CO2-budget niet meer dan 3.670 gigaton (hierna: Gt) CO2 mag bedragen. Volgens het UNEP bedroeg dit budget aan het begin van de negentiende eeuw ongeveer 2900 Gt CO2 en resteert inmiddels nog ongeveer 1000 Gt. In het rapport heeft het UNEP — kort gezegd — onderzocht wat de beste manier is om dit budget te besteden (en daarmee: welke reducties daarvoor nodig zijn). Daarbij is ook aandacht besteed aan de vraag wanneer, gegeven de tweegradendoelstelling, de wereld CO2-neutraal (een nettoresultaat aan antropogene positieve en negatieve CO2-emissies van nul) moet zijn. Het UNEP heeft dit weergegeven in deze figuur:

Figure ES.1:  Carbon neutrality

2.33.  In de “executive summary” van het rapport uit 2014 is verder nog opgenomen:

  1. 6.  What about the emissions gap in 2030?

    (…)

    This report estimates that global emissions in 2030 consistent with having a likely chance of staying within the 2 °C target are about 42 Gt CO2e.

    As for expected emissions in 2030, the range of the pledge cases in 2020 (52–54 Gt CO2e) was extrapolated to give median estimates of 56–59 Gt CO2e in 2030.

    The emissions gap in 2030 is therefore estimated to be 14–17 Gt CO2e (56 minus 42 and 59 minus 42). This is equivalent to about a third of current global greenhouse emissions (or 26–32 per cent of 2012 emission levels).

    As a reference point, the gap in 2030 relative to businessasusual emissions in that year (68 Gt CO2e) is 26 Gt CO2e. The good news is that the potential to reduce global emissions relative to the baseline is estimated to be 29 Gt CO2e, that is, larger than this gap. This means that it is feasible to close the 2030 gap and stay within the 2 °C limit.”

D.  Klimaatverandering en de ontwikkeling van een juridisch en beleidskader

2.34.  Met het oog op de klimaatverandering zijn in internationaal en Europees verband afspraken gemaakt en instrumenten ontwikkeld om de problemen van klimaatverandering op te vangen. Deze hebben hun weerslag gehad op het nationale juridische en beleidskader.

In VN-verband

VN Klimaatverdrag 1992

2.35.  In 1992 is onder verantwoordelijkheid van de VN het Klimaatverdrag (hierna: het VN Klimaatverdrag) gesloten en ondertekend. Het VN Klimaatverdrag is in werking getreden op 21 maart 1994. Op dit moment hebben 195 lidstaten, waaronder Nederland, en (de rechtsvoorganger van) de Europese Unie als zodanig (beide in 1993) het verdrag geratificeerd.

2.36.  Doel van het verdrag is, kort gezegd, het reduceren van de emissies van broeikasgassen en daarmee het voorkomen van ongewenste gevolgen van klimaatverandering. De aanhef vermeldt onder meer:

“Acknowledging that the global nature of climate change calls for the widest possible cooperation by all countries and their participation in an effective and appropriate international response, in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities and their social and economic conditions,

Recalling also that States have, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the principles of international law, the sovereign right to exploit their own resources pursuant to their own environmental and developmental policies, and the responsibility to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other States or of areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction,

Reaffirming the principle of sovereignty of States in international cooperation to address climate change,

Determined to protect the climate system for present and future generations, (…)”

2.37.  In artikel 2 van het VN Klimaatverdrag is het doel als volgt omschreven:

The ultimate objective of this Convention and any related legal instruments that the Conference of the Parties may adopt is to achieve, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a level should be achieved within a time-frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.

2.38.  In artikel 3 van het VN Klimaatverdrag zijn onder meer de volgende beginselen (“principles”) opgenomen:

  1. 1.  The Parties should protect the climate system for the benefit of present and future generations of humankind, on the basis of equity and in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Accordingly, the developed country Parties should take the lead in combating climate change and the adverse effects thereof.

    (…)

  2. 3.  The Parties should take precautionary measures to anticipate, prevent or minimize the causes of climate change and mitigate its adverse effects. Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing such measures, taking into account that policies and measures to deal with climate change should be cost-effective so as to ensure global benefits at the lowest possible cost. To achieve this, such policies and measures should take into account different socio-economic contexts, be comprehensive, cover all relevant sources, sinks and reservoirs of greenhouse gases and adaptation, and comprise all economic sectors. Efforts to address climate change may be carried out cooperatively by interested Parties.

  3. 4.  The Parties have a right to, and should, promote sustainable development. Policies and measures to protect the climate system against human-induced change should be appropriate for the specific conditions of each Party and should be integrated with national development programmes, taking into account that economic development is essential for adopting measures to address climate change.

2.39.  De partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag vormen twee groepen van landen: (1) de geïndustrialiseerde landen zoals vermeld in Annex I bij het verdrag, ook wel “Annex I-landen” genoemd, en (2) de ontwikkelingslanden of “niet-Annex I-landen”, zijnde alle andere landen die het VN Klimaatverdrag hebben geratificeerd. Nederland is een Annex I-land. Artikel 4, tweede lid, van het VN Klimaatverdrag bepaalt in het bijzonder ten aanzien van de Annex I-landen onder meer:

The developed country Parties and other Parties included in Annex I commit themselves specifically as provided for in the following:

  1. ( a)  Each of these Parties shall adopt national policies and take corresponding measures on the mitigation of climate change, by limiting its anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and protecting and enhancing its greenhouse gas sinks and reservoirs. These policies and measures will demonstrate that developed countries are taking the lead in modifying longer-term trends in anthropogenic emissions consistent with the objective of the Convention, recognizing that the return by the end of the present decade to earlier levels of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol would contribute to such modification, and taking into account the differences in these Parties' starting points and approaches, economic structures and resource bases, the need to maintain strong and sustainable economic growth, available technologies and other individual circumstances, as well as the need for equitable and appropriate contributions by each of these Parties to the global effort regarding that objective. These Parties may implement such policies and measures jointly with other Parties and may assist other Parties in contributing to the achievement of the objective of the Convention and, in particular, that of this subparagraph;

  2. ( b)  In order to promote progress to this end, each of these Parties shall communicate, within six months of the entry into force of the Convention for it and periodically thereafter, and in accordance with Article 12, detailed information on its policies and measures referred to in subparagraph (a) above, as well as on its resulting projected anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol for the period referred to in subparagraph (a), with the aim of returning individually or jointly to their 1990 levels these anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This information will be reviewed by the Conference of the Parties, at its first session and periodically thereafter, in accordance with Article 7; (…)

2.40.  Het artikel houdt aldus in dat de Annex I-landen, afzonderlijk of gezamenlijk, de verplichting zijn aangegaan om de groei van hun uitstoot van broeikasgassen tegen het jaar 2000 terug te brengen tot het niveau van 1990. Alle lidstaten zijn bovendien de verplichting aangegaan hun emissies jaarlijks aan het secretariaat van het VN Klimaatverdrag te rapporteren. De verplichtingen voor alle andere partijen bij de conventie (de niet-Annex I-landen) zijn minder verregaand. Zij behoeven geen emissiereducties door te voeren.

2.41.  Binnen de groep Annex I-landen heeft een aantal landen, waaronder Nederland, zich krachtens het VN Klimaatverdrag bovendien verplicht financiële ondersteuning te verlenen aan de niet-Annex I-landen.

Kyoto Protocol 1997 en Doha Amendement 2012

2.42.  In het kader van het VN Klimaatverdrag is in 1997 het Kyoto Protocol overeengekomen. Nederland, maar ook de (rechtsvoorganger van de) Europese Unie, destijds bestaande uit vijftien landen, waaronder Nederland, heeft het Kyoto Protocol geratificeerd. Het Kyoto Protocol is in werking getreden op 16 februari 2005.

2.43.  In het Protocol hebben de verdragsluitende landen zich ten doel gesteld om de gemiddelde jaarlijkse emissie van broeikasgassen in geïndustrialiseerde landen voor de periode 2008–2012 te verminderen met 5,2% ten opzichte van 1990 (artikel 3 lid 1 en bijlage B bij het Protocol). De reductiepercentages verschillen van land tot land. Voor de Europese Unie gold voor deze periode een reductiedoelstelling van 8% (bijlage B). De EU heeft vervolgens, na overleg met de lidstaten, de emissiereducties per lidstaat bepaald. Met Nederland is een emissiedoelstelling van 6% overeengekomen.

2.44.  Diverse landen, waaronder de Verenigde Staten en China, hebben het Protocol niet geratificeerd. Canada is in 2011 uitgetreden. Voordat Canada afhaakte bestreek het Protocol 14% van de mondiale emissies.

2.45.  Op 8 december 2012 is in Doha (Qatar) een amendement aangenomen op het Kyoto Protocol. Daarin zijn verschillende landen en ook de Europese Unie als geheel en haar lidstaten, CO2-emissiereductiedoelstellingen overeengekomen voor de periode 2013–2020. De Europese Unie heeft zich vastgelegd op een reductiedoelstelling van 20% per 2020 ten opzichte van 1990. De Europese Unie heeft aangeboden om zich tot een emissiereductie van 30% te verbinden, op voorwaarde dat zowel de ontwikkelde landen als de meer geavanceerde ontwikkelingslanden vergelijkbare uitstootdoelstellingen aangaan. Die voorwaarde is tot dusver niet in vervulling gegaan. Het Doha Amendement is nog niet in werking getreden.

2.46.  Japan, Rusland en Nieuw-Zeeland hebben zich voor deze tweede periode niet gebonden aan een bepaalde reductiedoelstelling. Daardoor regelt het Kyoto Protocol de CO2-uitstoot van 37 industrielanden, te weten de (toen) 27 individuele EU-lidstaten, Australië, IJsland, Kroatië, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Noorwegen, Oekraïne, Kazachstan, Zwitserland en Wit-Rusland, alsmede de EU als zelfstandige organisatie.

Klimaatconferenties (COP)

2.47.  Het VN Klimaatverdrag voorziet ook in de oprichting van de Conferentie van de Partijen (COP). Alle partijen hebben daarin zitting, elk met één stem. Jaarlijks beoordeelt de COP op grond van de door de lidstaten ingebrachte rapportages de stand van zaken bij de verwezenlijking van de doelstelling van het Verdrag. Zij rapporteert daarover. Tijdens deze klimaatconferenties kan de COP besluiten uitvaardigen. Dit vindt veelal plaats op basis van consensus.

a)  Bali Action Plan 2007

2.48.  Tijdens de klimaatconferentie op Bali in 2007 hebben de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag diverse besluiten uitgevaardigd, waaronder het Bali Action Plan (Decision 1/CP.13). In de preambule van dit besluit is onder meer opgenomen:

Responding to the findings of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that delay in reducing emissions significantly constrains opportunities to achieve lower stabilization levels and increases the risk of more severe climate change impacts,

Recognizing that deep cuts in global emissions will be required to achieve the ultimate objective of the Convention and emphasizing the urgency[1] to address climate change as is indicated in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

b)  Cancun Agreements 2010

2.49.  Tijdens de klimaatconferentie in Cancun in 2010 hebben de daarbij betrokken partijen diverse besluiten uitgevaardigd, waaronder de Cancun Agreements (Decision 1/CP.16). Daarin is onder meer opgenomen:

“Recalling its decision 1/CP.13 (the Bali Action Plan) and decision 1/CP.15 (…),

Noting resolution 10/4 of the United Nations Human Rights Council on human rights and climate change, which recognizes that the adverse effects of climate change have a range of direct and indirect implications for the effective enjoyment of human rights and that the effects of climate change will be felt most acutely by those segments of the population that are already vulnerable owing to geography, gender, age, indigenous or minority status, or disability (…),

  1. 4.  Further recognizes that deep cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions are required according to science, and as documented in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, with a view to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions so as to hold the increase in global average temperature below 2 °C above pre- industrial levels, and that Parties should take urgent action to meet this long-term goal, consistent with science and on the basis of equity; also recognizes the need to consider, in the context of the first review, as referred to in paragraph 138 below, strengthening the long-term global goal on the basis of the best available scientific knowledge, including in relation to a global average temperature rise of 1.5 °C; (…)”

2.50.  Voorts hebben de Annex I-landen tijdens de klimaatconferentie in Cancun in 2010 een besluit genomen met onder meer deze passage:10

“Decision 1/CMP.6 The Cancun Agreements: Outcome of the work of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Further Commitments for Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol at its fifteenth session

(…)

Recognizing that Parties included in Annex I (Annex I Parties) should continue to take the lead in combating climate change,

Also recognizing that the contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, indicates that achieving the lowest levels assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to date and its corresponding potential damage limitation would require Annex I Parties as a group to reduce emissions in a range of 25–40 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020, through means that may be available to these Parties to reach their emission reduction targets, (…)

  1. 4.  Urges Annex I Parties to raise the level of ambition of the emission reductions to be achieved by them individually or jointly, with a view to reducing their aggregate level of emissions of greenhouse gases in accordance with the range indicated by Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, and taking into account the quantitative implications of the use of land use, land-use change and forestry activities, emissions trading and project-based mechanisms and the carry-over of units from the first to the second commitment period; (…)”

Durban 2011

2.51.  Tijdens de klimaatconferentie in Durban in 2011 hebben de daarbij betrokken partijen diverse besluiten uitgevaardigd. In Decision 1/CP.17 is onder meer opgenomen:

Recognizing that climate change represents an urgent and potentially irreversible threat to human societies and the planet and thus requires to be urgently addressed by all Parties (…),

Noting with grave concern the significant gap between the aggregate effect of Parties’ mitigation pledges in terms of global annual emissions of greenhouse gases by 2020 and aggregate emission pathways consistent with having a likely chance of holding the increase in global average temperature below 2 °C or 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, (…)”

2.52.  Bij de conferentie in Durban is voorts afgesproken dat uiterlijk in 2015 een nieuw juridisch bindend klimaatverdrag of protocol dient te worden afgesloten, dat tegen 2020 geïmplementeerd moet worden. Als vervolg op deze afspraak vindt in december 2015 de klimaatconferentie in Parijs plaats.

In Europees verband

2.53.  Artikel 191 van het Verdrag betreffende de werking van de Europese Unie (VWEU) luidt thans als volgt:

Artikel 191 

  1. 1.  Het beleid van de Unie op milieugebied draagt bij tot het nastreven van de volgende doelstellingen:

    • —  behoud, bescherming en verbetering van de kwaliteit van het milieu;

    • —  bescherming van de gezondheid van de mens;

    • —  behoedzaam en rationeel gebruik van natuurlijke hulpbronnen;

    • —  bevordering op internationaal vlak van maatregelen om het hoofd te bieden aan regionale of mondiale milieuproblemen, en in het bijzonder de bestrijding van klimaatverandering.

  2. 2.  De Unie streeft in haar milieubeleid naar een hoog niveau van bescherming, rekening houdend met de uiteenlopende situaties in de verschillende regio’s van de Unie. Haar beleid berust op het voorzorgsbeginsel en het beginsel van preventief handelen, het beginsel dat milieuaantastingen bij voorrang aan de bron dienen te worden bestreden, en het beginsel dat de vervuiler betaalt.

    In dit verband omvatten de aan eisen inzake milieubescherming beantwoordende harmonisatiemaatregelen, in de gevallen die daarvoor in aanmerking komen, een vrijwaringsclausule op grond waarvan de lidstaten om niet-economische milieuredenen voorlopige maatregelen kunnen nemen die aan een toetsingsprocedure van de Unie onderworpen zijn.

  3. 3.  Bij het bepalen van haar beleid op milieugebied houdt de Unie rekening met:

    • —  de beschikbare wetenschappelijke en technische gegevens;

    • —  de milieuomstandigheden in de onderscheiden regio’s van de Unie;

    • —  de voordelen en lasten die kunnen voortvloeien uit optreden, onderscheidenlijk niet-optreden;

    • —  de economische en sociale ontwikkeling van de Unie als geheel en de evenwichtige ontwikkeling van haar regio’s.

  4. 4.  In het kader van hun onderscheiden bevoegdheden werken de Unie en de lidstaten samen met derde landen en de bevoegde internationale organisaties. De nadere regels voor de samenwerking van de Unie kunnen voorwerp zijn van overeenkomsten tussen de Unie en de betrokken derde partijen.

    De eerste alinea doet geen afbreuk aan de bevoegdheid van de lidstaten om in internationale fora te onderhandelen en internationale overeenkomsten te sluiten.

2.54.  Op grond van artikel 192 VWEU stellen in de regel (behoudens de uitzondering geformuleerd in het tweede lid) het Europees Parlement en de Raad volgens de gewone wetgevingsprocedure (dat wil zeggen op voorstel van de Commissie) en na raadpleging van het Europees Economisch en Sociaal Comité (EESC) en het Comité van de Regio’s (CvdR) de activiteiten vast die de Unie moet ondernemen om de doelstellingen van artikel 191 te verwezenlijken.

2.55.  Artikel 193 VWEU luidt thans aldus:

Artikel 193 

De beschermende maatregelen die worden vastgesteld uit hoofde van artikel 192, beletten niet dat een lidstaat verdergaande beschermingsmaatregelen handhaaft en treft. Zulke maatregelen moeten verenigbaar zijn met de Verdragen. Zij worden ter kennis van de Commissie gebracht.

2.56.  In 2002 heeft de EU, mede als vervolg op het Kyoto Protocol, bij Besluit nr. 1600/2002/EG tot vaststelling van het Zesde Milieuactieprogramma van de Europese Gemeenschap haar milieudoelstellingen en -prioriteiten onder meer als volgt geformuleerd:

Artikel 2  Beginselen en algemene doeleinden (…)

  1. 2.  Het programma is gericht op het volgende:

    • —  het benadrukken dat klimaatverandering een belangrijke uitdaging is voor de komende 10 jaar en daarna, en het bijdragen tot de langetermijndoelstelling van stabilisatie van de concentraties van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer op een niveau waarbij gevaarlijke antropogene verstoring van het klimaatsysteem wordt voorkomen. Een langetermijndoelstelling van een maximale wereldwijde temperatuurstijging van 2 °C boven de preïndustriële niveaus en een CO2-concentratie van minder dan 550 ppm gelden daarom als leidraad voor het programma. Op langere termijn vergt dit wellicht een wereldwijde vermindering van de uitstoot van broeikasgassen met 70 % ten opzichte van het niveau van 1990, zoals dat is vastgesteld door het Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (…).”

2.57.  Nadien heeft de Europese Unie haar doelstellingen omgezet in Europeesrechtelijke regels, onder meer door de introductie van een groot aantal richtlijnen, waaronder de Richtlijn tot vaststelling van een regeling voor de handel in broeikasgasemissierechten (Richtlijn 2003/87/EG, hierna: de ETS Richtlijn), waarmee het European Union Emission Trading System (ETS) werd geïntroduceerd. Dit systeem geldt alleen voor grote energie-intensieve bedrijven, zoals grote elektriciteitscentrales en raffinaderijen (hierna ook: de ETS-bedrijven). Niet-ETS-sectoren, zoals transport, landbouw, woningen en kleinere bedrijven, vallen buiten het ETS-systeem.

2.58.  De preambule van Richtlijn 2009/29/EG tot wijziging van de ETS Richtlijn vermeldt onder meer:

  1. (6)  Om de zekerheid en voorspelbaarheid van de Gemeenschapsregeling te bevorderen dienen er bepalingen te worden vastgesteld om de bijdrage van de Gemeenschapsregeling op te voeren teneinde tot een algehele beperking van meer dan 20 % te komen, met name gelet op de doelstelling van de Europese Raad voor een beperking met 30 % tegen 2020, die op wetenschappelijke gronden noodzakelijk wordt geacht om een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen. (…)

  2. (13)  De hoeveelheid emissierechten voor de hele Gemeenschap, berekend vanaf halverwege de periode van 2008 tot 2012, dient op een lineaire wijze te worden verlaagd om ervoor te zorgen dat de regeling voor de handel in emissierechten in de loop der tijd een geleidelijke en voorspelbare emissiebeperking oplevert. De jaarlijkse verlaging van de emissierechten dient gelijk te zijn aan 1,74 % van de emissierechten die krachtens de beschikkingen van de Commissie inzake de nationale toewijzingsplannen van de lidstaten voor de periode van 2008 tot 2012 door de lidstaten worden verleend, zodat de Gemeenschapsregeling een kosteneffectieve bijdrage levert tot de verwezenlijking van de verbintenis van de Gemeenschap om de algehele emissie tegen 2020 met ten minste 20 % te verlagen.

  3. (14)  Deze bijdrage komt overeen met een emissiebeperking in 2020 in de Gemeenschapsregeling tot 21 % onder de gerapporteerde niveaus van 2005. (…)”

2.59.  De artikelen 1 en 9 van de ETS Richtlijn luiden — na wijziging — als volgt:

Artikel 1  Onderwerp

Bij deze richtlijn wordt een Gemeenschapsregeling vastgesteld voor de handel in broeikasgasemissierechten, hierna „de Gemeenschapsregeling‟ genoemd, teneinde de emissies van broeikasgassen op een kosteneffectieve en economisch efficiënte wijze te verminderen.

Deze richtlijn voorziet tevens in een sterkere verlaging van de emissies van broeikasgassen teneinde bij te dragen tot het reductieniveau dat op wetenschappelijke gronden nodig wordt geacht om een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen.

In deze richtlijn worden tevens bepalingen vastgesteld voor de beoordeling en uitvoering van een strengere reductieverbintenis van de Gemeenschap van meer dan 20 %, die moet gelden na de goedkeuring door de Gemeenschap van een internationale overeenkomst inzake klimaatverandering die tot grotere broeikasgasemissiereducties leidt dan op grond van artikel 9 vereist is, zoals weerspiegeld in de 30 %-verbintenis die de Europese Raad van maart 2007 heeft onderschreven.

Artikel 9  Hoeveelheid emissierechten voor de hele Gemeenschap

De hoeveelheid emissierechten die met ingang van 2013 elk jaar voor de hele Gemeenschap wordt verleend, neemt lineair af vanaf het tijdstip halverwege de periode van 2008 tot 2012. De hoeveelheid neemt af met een lineaire factor van 1,74 % van de gemiddelde jaarlijkse totale hoeveelheid emissierechten die door de lidstaten overeenkomstig de beschikkingen van de Commissie inzake hun nationale toewijzingsplannen voor de periode van 2008 tot 2012 worden verleend.

De Commissie publiceert uiterlijk op 30 juni 2010 de absolute hoeveelheid emissierechten voor 2013 voor de gehele Gemeenschap, die is gebaseerd op de totale hoeveelheden emissierechten die door de lidstaten overeenkomstig de beschikkingen van de Commissie inzake hun nationale toewijzingsplannen voor de periode van 2008 tot 2012 zijn of zullen worden verleend.

De Commissie evalueert de lineaire factor en dient indien nodig na 2020 een voorstel in bij het Europees Parlement en bij de Raad, opdat uiterlijk in 2025 een besluit kan worden goedgekeurd.”

2.60.  In de mededeling van de Europese Commissie aan het Europees Parlement, de Raad, het EESC en het CvdR van 10 januari 2007 met de titel “De Wereldwijde klimaatverandering beperken tot 2 graden Celsius. Het beleid tot 2020 en daarna”, is onder meer het volgende vermeld:11

  1. 2.  DE KLIMAATUITDAGING: HET BEHALEN VAN DE 2°C-DOELSTELLING

    Sterke wetenschappelijke bewijzen tonen aan dat er dringend maatregelen nodig zijn om de klimaatverandering aan te pakken. Uit recente studies, zoals het Sternrapport, blijkt dat de kosten enorm zullen oplopen indien niets wordt ondernomen. Het gaat om economische, maar ook om sociale en milieukosten die in de eerste plaats zullen worden gedragen door de armen, zowel in de ontwikkelingslanden als in de ontwikkelde landen. Indien geen maatregelen worden genomen dreigen er ernstige veiligheidsproblemen te ontstaan op lokaal en wereldniveau. De meeste oplossingen zijn beschikbaar, maar regeringen dienen maatregelen te nemen om ze in te voeren. Maatregelen tegen klimaatverandering zijn economisch haalbaar en bieden bovendien ook aanzienlijke voordelen op andere vlakken. De doelstelling van de EU is een beperking van de gemiddelde mondiale temperatuurstijging tot minder dan 2°C ten aanzien van het pre-industriële niveau. Daardoor blijven de effecten van de klimaatverandering beperkt en vermindert het risico op grootschalige en onomkeerbare verstoringen van het wereldwijde ecosysteem. De Raad heeft erop gewezen dat de BKG-concentratie in de atmosfeer een stuk onder de grens van 550 ppmv CO2-equivalent dient te blijven om deze doelstelling te halen. Indien de concentratie op lange termijn stabiliseert op een niveau van ongeveer 450 ppmv CO2-equivalent bedraagt de kans 50% dat deze doelstelling wordt gehaald. Dit betekent dat de uitstoot op wereldschaal een piek bereikt voor 2025 en vervolgens tegen 2050 dient te dalen tot 50% van de uitstoot in 1990. De Raad is het ermee eens dat de ontwikkelde landen het voortouw moeten blijven nemen en hun uitstoot tegen 2020 met 15 tot 30% moeten verminderen. Het Europees Parlement heeft voor de vermindering van de CO2-uitstoot als doelstelling een daling met 30% tegen 2020 en met 60 tot 80% tegen 2050 voorgesteld.”

2.61.  Het EESC heeft in juli 2008 advies uitgebracht over het “Voorstel voor een richtlijn van het Europees Parlement en de Raad tot wijziging van Richtlijn 2003/87/EG teneinde de regeling voor de handel in broeikasgasemissierechten van de Gemeenschap te verbeteren en uit te breiden”. Dit voorstel houdt onder meer het volgende in:12

  1. 6.5  Het EESC schenkt daarom bijzondere aandacht aan de mate waarin ETS een billijke en duurzame impact kan uitoefenen op wereldwijde reductie van broeikasgassen. Kan het aantonen dat het Europese optreden geloofwaardig en doeltreffend is? In deze context zij opgemerkt dat de EU-doelstelling van 20 %-reductie van broeikasgassen tegen 2020 ten opzichte van de niveaus in 1990 (waarop ETS en de voorstellen voor lastenverdeling gebaseerd zijn) minder hoog mikt dan de reductie van 25 à 40 % voor geïndustrialiseerde landen waarvoor de EU op de klimaatveranderingsconferentie van Bali in december 2007 heeft gepleit. De Commissie hanteert de doelstellingen die door de Europese Raad in het voorjaar van 2007 zijn overeengekomen. Zij laat daarbij buiten beschouwing of dit reductieniveau werkelijk volstaat om de wereldwijde doelstellingen te verwezenlijken, dan wel alleen de wellicht maximaal aanvaardbare reductie aangeeft, rekening houdend met het evenwicht tussen de politieke en economische kortetermijnbelangen van de lidstaten. Het EESC concludeert dat het op basis van het toegenomen bewijsmateriaal betreffende de klimaatverandering zaak is de doelstellingen bij te stellen teneinde de broeikasgasemissies sterker terug te dringen.”

2.62.  Bij beschikking nr. 406/2009/EG van het Europees Parlement en de Raad van 23 april 2009 inzake de inspanningen van de lidstaten om hun broeikasgasemissies te verminderen om aan de verbintenissen van de Gemeenschap op het gebied van het verminderen van broeikasgassen tot 2020 te voldoen (de “Effort Sharing Decision”), is met het oog op de regulering van de uitstoot in de niet-ETS-sectoren het volgende overwogen en vastgesteld:

  1. (2)  Naar de mening van de Gemeenschap, recentelijk tot uitdrukking gebracht door met name de Europese Raad van maart 2007, zou de gemiddelde temperatuur aan het aardoppervlak, om deze doelstelling te halen, wereldwijd niet meer dan 2 °C boven de pre-industriële niveaus mogen uitstijgen, wat erop neerkomt dat de broeikasgasemissies tegen 2050 ten minste tot 50 % onder het niveau van 1990 verminderd zouden moeten zijn. De onder deze beschikking vallende broeikasgasemissies in de Gemeenschap dienen ook na 2020 te blijven dalen als onderdeel van de inspanningen van de Gemeenschap om een bijdrage te leveren aan deze mondiale emissiereductiedoelstelling. De ontwikkelde landen, waaronder de lidstaten van de Europese Unie, moeten de leiding blijven nemen door zich ertoe te verbinden hun broeikasgasemissies tegen 2020 collectief met 30 % te verminderen ten opzichte van 1990. Zij moeten dat ook doen om tegen 2050 hun broeikasgasemissies collectief te verminderen met 60 à 80 % ten opzichte van 1990. (…)

  2. (3)  Om deze doelstelling te bereiken, heeft de Europese Raad verder tijdens zijn vergadering van maart 2007 een communautaire doelstelling van 30 % reductie van broeikasgasemissies tegen 2020 ten opzichte van het niveau van 1990 goedgekeurd als bijdrage tot een globale en veelomvattende overeenkomst voor de periode na 2012, op voorwaarde dat andere ontwikkelde landen zich tot vergelijkbare emissiereducties verbinden en dat economisch meer ontwikkelde ontwikkelingslanden zich ertoe verbinden een adequate bijdrage te leveren die in verhouding staat tot hun verantwoordelijkheden en capaciteiten.

  3. (4)  De Europese Raad van maart 2007 heeft benadrukt dat de Gemeenschap zich ervoor inzet Europa om te vormen tot een in hoge mate energiezuinige en weinig broeikasgassen uitstotende economie, en heeft besloten dat de Europese Unie, totdat een globale en veelomvattende overeenkomst voor de periode na 2012 is gesloten, en zonder afbreuk te doen aan haar positie bij internationale onderhandelingen, zich er geheel zelfstandig toe verbindt om tegen 2020 ten minste 20 % minder broeikasgassen uit te stoten dan in 1990 (…).

  4. (6)  Richtlijn 2003/87/EG stelt een regeling vast voor de handel in broeikasgasemissierechten binnen de Gemeenschap, die bepaalde sectoren in de economie bestrijkt. Om tegen 2020 de doelstelling van een vermindering met 20 % van de emissie van broeikasgassen ten opzichte van het niveau van 1990 op kosteneffectieve wijze te halen, moeten alle sectoren van de economie aan de emissiereductie bijdragen. De lidstaten moeten derhalve aanvullende beleidsinitiatieven en maatregelen invoeren om te trachten de emissie van broeikasgassen door bronnen die niet onder Richtlijn 2003/87/EG vallen, verder terug te dringen.

  5. (7)  De door elke lidstaat te leveren inspanning moet worden vastgesteld in verhouding tot de hoeveelheid broeikasgasemissies in 2005 die onder deze beschikking valt, na uitsluiting van de emissies van installaties die in 2005 bestonden, maar in de periode van 2006 tot en met 2012 onder de Gemeenschapsregeling zijn gebracht. De jaarlijkse emissieruimte voor de periode van 2013 tot en met 2020, uitgedrukt in ton kooldioxide-equivalent, dienen op basis van herziene en geverifieerde gegevens te worden vastgesteld.

  6. (9)  Om verder te zorgen voor een eerlijke verdeling tussen de lidstaten van de inspanningen om een bijdrage te leveren aan de uitvoering van de eenzijdige verbintenis van de Gemeenschap om de emissies terug te dringen, mag geen enkele lidstaat worden verplicht zijn broeikasgasemissies tegen 2020 tot meer dan 20 % onder het niveau van 2005 te verminderen noch worden toegestaan zijn broeikasgasemissies in 2020 tot meer dan 20 % boven het niveau van 2005 te verhogen. De broeikasgasemissiereducties moeten plaatsvinden tussen 2013 en 2020. Het moet elke lidstaat worden toegestaan een hoeveelheid tot 5 % van zijn jaarlijkse emissieruimte van het volgende jaar eerder te gebruiken. Het moet een lidstaat waarvan de emissies lager waren dan die jaarlijkse emissieruimte, worden toegestaan zijn extra tot stand gebrachte emissiereducties naar de volgende jaren over te dragen (…).

  7. (17)  Deze beschikking moet strengere nationale doelstellingen onverlet laten. Wanneer lidstaten hun onder deze beschikking vallende broeikasgasemissies sterker verminderen dan waartoe zij op grond van deze beschikking verplicht zijn, teneinde een strengere doelstelling te verwezenlijken, moet de beperking waarin deze beschikking voorziet voor het gebruik van broeikasgasemissiereductiekredieten, niet gelden voor de bijkomende emissiereductie om de nationale doelstelling te halen. (…)

Artikel 1  Toepassingsgebied

In deze beschikking wordt de minimumbijdrage vastgesteld die de lidstaten moeten leveren aan de verbintenis van de Gemeenschap voor de periode van 2013 tot en met 2020 om verminderingen te realiseren van de onder deze beschikking vallende broeikasgasemissies, en worden regels vastgesteld voor het leveren van die bijdragen en voor de evaluatie daarvan.

In deze beschikking worden tevens bepalingen vastgesteld voor de beoordeling en uitvoering van een strengere reductieverbintenis van de Gemeenschap van meer dan 20 %, die moet gelden na de goedkeuring door de Gemeenschap van een internationale overeenkomst inzake klimaatverandering die tot grotere emissiereducties leidt dan op grond van artikel 3 vereist is, zoals weerspiegeld in de verbintenis tot reductie met 30 % die de Europese Raad van maart 2007 heeft onderschreven (…).

Artikel 3  Emissieniveaus voor de periode van 2013 tot en met 2020.

  1. 1.  Iedere lidstaat beperkt tegen 2020 zijn broeikasgasemissies ten minste met het percentage dat voor die lidstaat in bijlage II bij deze beschikking is vastgesteld ten opzichte van de emissies van die lidstaat in 2005.

    (…)

Bijlage II 

Broeikasgasemissiereductiedoelstellingen per lidstaat in 2020 in vergelijking met de broeikasgasemissies in 2005

(…)

Nederland

-16 %

(…)”

2.63.  In de mededeling van de Europese Commissie aan het Europees Parlement, de Raad, het EESC en het CvdR van 26 mei 2010 getiteld “Analyse van de opties voor een broeikasgasemissiereductie van meer dan 20% en beoordeling van het risico van koolstoflekkage”, is onder meer het volgende vermeld:13

“Door in 2008 te beslissen haar broeikasgasemissies terug te dringen, heeft de EU haar vastberadenheid getoond om het probleem van de klimaatverandering bij de horens te vatten en daarbij mondiaal een voortrekkersrol te spelen. Een cruciale maatregel in het kader van het beleid van duurzame ontwikkeling van de EU was de vermindering van het uitstootniveau tegen 2020 met 20% ten opzichte van de niveaus van 1990 samen met de doelstelling om 20% van de energie duurzaam te produceren. Dit gaf de rest van de wereld het duidelijke signaal dat de EU bereid was de nodige maatregelen te treffen. De EU zal haar doelstellingen overeenkomstig het Kyoto-protocol verwezenlijken en heeft een sterk traject gevolgd op het gebied van de strijd tegen de klimaatverandering.

Maar het was altijd duidelijk dat actie van de EU alleen niet zal volstaan om de klimaatverandering aan te pakken en dat een uitstootvermindering met 20% door de EU niet het einde van het verhaal kan zijn. Dit volstaat niet om de algemene doelstelling van een beperking van de opwarming van de aarde tot minder dan 2°C ten opzichte van het preindustriële niveau te bereiken. Alle landen zullen een extra inspanning moeten doen, inclusief beperking door de ontwikkelde landen van hun emissies met 80 tot 95% tegen 2050. Een EU-doelstelling van 20% in 2020 is slechts een eerste stap om de emissiereductie op dit spoor te krijgen.

Dat is de reden waarom de EU haar unilaterale verbintenis van emissiereductie met 20% heeft aangevuld met de verbintenis om naar 30% te gaan als onderdeel van een echte mondiale inspanning. Dit blijft ook vandaag nog het streven van de EU.

Sinds er overeenstemming is bereikt over dit EU-beleid zijn de omstandigheden snel veranderd. Er is een economische crisis zonder weerga uitgebarsten. Die heeft het zakenleven en de gemeenschappen in geheel Europa onder grote druk gesteld en heeft de overheidsfinanciën zwaar op de proef gesteld. Maar tegelijkertijd heeft deze crisis het bewustzijn versterkt dat er grote opportuniteiten zijn voor Europa om een samenleving op te bouwen die zuinig met de beschikbare middelen omspringt.

Ondertussen heeft ook de top van Kopenhagen plaatsgevonden. Hoewel het ontgoochelend is dat er geen volledige, bindende internationale overeenkomst kon worden afgesloten om de klimaatverandering aan te pakken, is het meest positieve resultaat dat de landen die verantwoordelijk zijn voor ongeveer 80% van de emissies belangrijke beloften hebben gedaan om die emissies op aanzienlijke wijze terug te dringen, ook al zullen die beloften niet volstaan om het 2°C-streefcijfer te bereiken. Het blijft belangrijk het akkoord van Kopenhagen te integreren in het aan de gang zijnde overleg in het kader van het UNFCCC (Raamverdrag van de VN inzake klimaatverandering). Maar de noodzaak van actie blijft onverkort gelden.

Het doel van deze mededeling is niet om de 30%-doelstelling vandaag vast te leggen, aangezien het duidelijk is dat de voorwaarden daarvoor nog ontbreken. Om een meer op gegevens gebaseerde discussie over de gevolgen van de verschillende ambitieniveaus te vergemakkelijken, wordt in deze mededeling een analyse gemaakt van de consequenties van de 20%- en 30%-doelstellingen als gezien tegen de achtergrond van de huidige toestand. (…)”

2.64.  In de mededeling van de Europese Commissie aan het Europees Parlement, de Raad, het EESC en het CvdR van 8 maart 2011 getiteld “Routekaart naar een concurrerende koolstofarme economie in 2050”, is onder meer het volgende vermeld:14

  1. 1.  DE UITDAGINGEN WAAR EUROPA VOOR STAAT

    (…) Om de klimaatverandering te beperkten tot minder dan 2°C heeft de Europese Raad zich in februari 2011 opnieuw achter de EU-doelstelling geschaard om de uitstoot van broeikasgassen tegen 2050 met 80 tot 95% te verminderen ten opzichte van 1990, overeenkomstig de volgens het Intergouvernementeel Panel over klimaatverandering noodzakelijke reductie voor de groep van ontwikkelde landen. Dit stemt overeen met het standpunt van de wereldleiders in de akkoorden van Cancún en Kopenhagen. Deze akkoorden bevatten de verplichting om koolstofarme ontwikkelingsstrategieën te ontwikkelen. Een aantal lidstaten hebben reeds stappen in die richting genomen of zijn bezig met de vaststelling van emissiereductiedoelstellingen voor 2050. (…)

  2. 2.  MIJLPALEN TOT 2050

    De overschakeling naar een concurrerende koolstofarme economie betekent dat de Unie maatregelen moet nemen om de EU-uitstoot tegen 2050 met 80% te verminderen ten opzichte van 1990. De Commissie heeft een uitvoerige modellering gedaan met verschillende scenario's die aantonen hoe deze doelstelling kan worden bereikt. (…)

    Uit de analyse van de verschillende scenario's blijkt dat een vermindering van de EU-uitstoot tot 40% en 60% onder het niveau van 1990 een kostenefficiënt perspectief is voor respectievelijk 2030 en 2040. In die context wijst de analyse ook op een reductie met 25% in 2020. (…). Een dergelijke reductiepad betekent dat de jaarlijkse reductie ten opzichte van 1990 tijdens het eerste decennium tot 2020 ongeveer 1% zou bedragen, tussen 2020 en 2030 zou oplopen tot 1,5%, en tussen 2030 en 2050 tot 2% per jaar. De inspanning kan na verloop van tijd groter worden aangezien meer betaalbare technologieën beschikbaar worden.

    (…)

    Volgens ramingen lag de uitstoot, met inbegrip van de internationale luchtvaart, in 2009 16% lager dan in 1990. Indien het huidige beleid onverkort wordt uitgevoerd, zit de EU op schema om haar uitstoot tegen 2020 met 20% te verminderen ten opzichte van 1990 en met 30% tegen 2030. Zonder bijsturing van het beleid zal de doelstelling om de energieefficiëntie tegen 2020 met 20% te verbeteren echter maar voor de helft worden bereikt.

    Indien de EU haar huidige beleid uitvoert, met inbegrip van haar verbintenis om het aandeel van hernieuwbare energie tegen 2020 op te trekken tot 20% en de energie-efficiëntie met 20% te verbeteren, kan de Unie de huidige 20%-emissiereductiedoelstelling zelfs overtreffen en in 2020 een daling met 25% bereiken. Om dat te bereiken moet ook het energie-efficiëntieplan volledig worden uitgevoerd. (…)

  3. 6.  CONCLUSIES

    (…) Om op schema te blijven om de totale uitstoot van broeikasgassen tegen 2050 met 80 tot 95% te verminderen toont de routekaart aan dat voor een kostenefficiënte en geleidelijk overschakeling de EU-uitstoot van broeikasgassen tegen 2030 40% lager en tegen 2050 80% lager moet liggen dan in 1990.

    (…)

    In deze mededeling wordt niet voorgesteld voor 2020 nieuwe doelstellingen vast te stellen en wordt evenmin het EU-voorstel in internationale onderhandelingen om, indien aan bepaalde voorwaarden voldaan is, de uitstoot tegen 2020 met 30% te verminderen in twijfel getrokken. De basis voor die besprekingen blijft de mededeling van de Commissie van 26 mei 2010.”

2.65.  Het Europees Parlement heeft op 15 maart 2012 een resolutie over de in 2.64 genoemde Routekaart aangenomen waarin onder meer de Routekaart en het daarin vervatte traject en de specifieke mijlpalen voor de vermindering van de EU-uitstoot tot 40, 60, 80% tegen respectievelijk 2030, 2040 en 2050 worden onderschreven.15

2.66.  Op 22 januari 2014 heeft de Europese Commissie de volgende mededeling gepubliceerd: “Mededeling van de Commissie aan het Europees Parlement, de Raad, het Europees Economisch en Sociaal Comité en het Comité van de regio’s, Een beleidskader voor klimaat en energie in de periode 2020–2030”. Daarin heeft de Commissie onder meer het volgende bekendgemaakt:16

  1. 2.1  Een streefcijfer voor broeikasgasemissies

    De Commissie stelt voor om voor de binnen de EU plaatsvindende broeikasgasemissies in 2030 een reductiestreefcijfer van 40 % ten opzichte van 1990 vast te stellen. Daarbij moet worden opgemerkt dat het beleid en de maatregelen die de lidstaten met betrekking tot hun huidige emissiereductieverplichtingen hebben ingevoerd en gepland, ook na 2020 effect zullen blijven sorteren. Als die maatregelen volledig worden uitgevoerd en doeltreffend blijken, mag daarvan een uitstootvermindering met 32 % ten opzichte van 1990 worden verwacht. Dit zal een voortgezette inspanning vergen, maar het toont ook de haalbaarheid van het voor 2030 voorgestelde streefcijfer aan. Continue monitoring blijft hoe dan ook van belang om rekening te houden met de internationale dimensie en te garanderen dat de Unie het meest kostenefficiënte traject naar een koolstofluwe economie blijft volgen.

    De met het EU-streefcijfer overeenstemmende reductie moet worden verdeeld tussen de ETS en een bijdrage die de lidstaten gezamenlijk moeten leveren in de niet onder de ETS vallende sectoren. Ten opzichte van 2005 zou de ETS-sector in 2030 een broeikasgasemissievermindering met 43 % tot stand moeten brengen en de niet-ETS-sector een vermindering met 30 %. Om de vereiste emissiereducties in de ETS-sector tot stand te brengen, zal de factor waarmee het emissieplafond binnen de ETS jaarlijks wordt verlaagd, moeten worden verhoogd van 1,74% thans naar 2,2 % na 2020.

    (…) De Commissie acht het niet dienstig om vóór het begin van de internationale onderhandelingen een hoger "voorwaardelijk streefcijfer" voor te stellen. Mocht de uitkomst van de onderhandelingen zodanig zijn dat een ambitieuzer streefcijfer voor de Unie gerechtvaardigd is, dan kan die extra inspanning worden opgevangen door het gebruik van internationale emissiecredits.”

2.67.  De Europese leiders hebben tijdens een bijeenkomst van de Europese Raad op 23/24 oktober 2014 overeenstemming bereikt over het beleidskader klimaat en energie 2030 voor de Europese Unie.17 De hiervoor genoemde reductiestreefcijfers en de aanpassing van het emissieplafond binnen het ETS van het Commissievoorstel zijn daarbij overgenomen.

2.68.  Op 25 februari 2015 heeft de Europese Commissie de “Mededeling van de Commissie aan het Europees Parlement en de Raad. Het Protocol van Parijs — Een blauwdruk om de wereldwijde klimaatverandering na 2020 tegen te gaan” gepubliceerd. Hierin heeft zij onder meer het volgende bekendgemaakt:18

  1. 1.  Samenvatting

    Volgens de meest recente bevindingen van de Intergouvernementele Werkgroep inzake klimaatverandering (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC) zal de klimaatverandering ernstige, verregaande en onomkeerbare gevolgen voor de wereldbevolking en de ecosystemen meebrengen indien er niet dringend wordt ingegrepen. Om de gevaarlijke stijging van de gemiddelde temperatuur op aarde onder de 2 °C te houden in vergelijking met het pre-industriële tijdperk (de "minder dan 2 °C"-doelstelling) moeten alle landen hun broeikasgasemissies substantieel en blijvend verminderen.

    Deze wereldwijde overgang naar een situatie van lage emissies kan worden verwezenlijkt zonder dat dit ten koste van groei en werkgelegenheid hoeft te gaan, en kan een uitgelezen mogelijkheid bieden om de economieën in Europa en wereldwijd nieuw leven in te blazen. Bestrijding van de klimaatverandering heeft tevens grote positieve effecten wat het welzijn van de burgers betreft. Wordt echter niet snel genoeg werk van deze overgang gemaakt, dan zullen de totale kosten oplopen en zullen er steeds minder mogelijkheden overblijven om op doeltreffende wijze de emissies te beperken en in te spelen op de gevolgen van de klimaatverandering.

    Alle landen moeten de handen ineenslaan en dringend tot actie overgaan. Al sinds 1994 staat deze problematiek hoog op de agenda van de partijen bij het Raamverdrag van de Verenigde Naties inzake klimaatverandering (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, UNFCCC, hierna: VN-Klimaatverdrag), wat ertoe heeft geleid dat meer dan 90 ontwikkelde én ontwikkelingslanden hebben toegezegd hun emissies tegen 2020 terug te dringen. Er is evenwel meer nodig dan toezeggingen alleen om de "minder dan 2 °C"-doelstelling te bereiken. Om deze redenen zijn de partijen bij het VN-Klimaatverdrag in 2012 onderhandelingen gestart over een nieuwe, voor alle partijen juridisch bindende overeenkomst, waarmee de wereld op het juiste spoor moet worden gezet om de "minder dan 2 °C"-doelstelling te halen. Het is de bedoeling dat de overeenkomst in december 2015 in Parijs haar beslag krijgt en vanaf 2020 wordt uitgevoerd. (…)

    De EU heeft ruim vóór de conferentie van Lima wederom het voortouw genomen en blijk gegeven van vastberadenheid bij de wereldwijde aanpak van de klimaatverandering. Tijdens de Europese top van oktober 2014 waren de Europese leiders het erover eens dat de EU haar inspanningen moest opvoeren en haar eigen emissies tegen 2030 met ten minste 40 % moest terugdringen ten opzichte van 1990. Hierop kondigden ook China en de VS stappen aan. In Lima hebben de lidstaten van de EU toegezegd ongeveer de helft van de eerste kapitalisatie van 10 miljard USD van het Groen Klimaatfonds (Green Climate Fund, GCF) voor steun aan ontwikkelingslanden voor hun rekening te nemen. Op EUniveau is een nieuw investeringsplan goedgekeurd. Met dit plan moeten in de komende drie jaar (2015–2017) openbare en particuliere investeringen in de reële economie ten belope van ten minste 315 miljard EUR worden aangetrokken. Het is de bedoeling dat deze investeringen helpen de economie in de EU op een moderne en koolstofarmere leest te schoeien.

    Deze mededeling sluit aan op de in Lima genomen besluiten en is van cruciaal belang voor de uitvoering van de prioriteit die de Commissie heeft gemaakt van het bouwen aan een schokbestendige energie-unie met een toekomstgericht beleid inzake klimaatverandering in overeenstemming met de politieke richtsnoeren van de voorzitter van de Commissie. Deze mededeling bereidt de EU voor op de laatste ronde van onderhandelingen die nog zal plaatsvinden vóór de conferentie van Parijs in december 2015. (…)”

In nationaal verband

2.69.  Artikel 21 van de Grondwet (Gw) luidt als volgt:

De zorg van de overheid is gericht op de bewoonbaarheid van het land en de bescherming en verbetering van het leefmilieu.

2.70.  Met de Implementatiewet EG-richtlijn handel in broeikasgasemissierechten van 30 september 2004 is door aanpassing van onder andere de Wet milieubeheer de ETS Richtlijn omgezet in het nationale recht. Aan de Wet milieubeheer is een zestiende hoofdstuk toegevoegd, met de titel “handel in emissierechten”. Dit hoofdstuk regelt, kort gezegd, de vergunningverlening ten behoeve van inrichtingen waarin zich broeikasgasinstallaties bevinden en de verlening, toewijzing en inzet van broeikasgasemissierechten. Richtlijn nr. 2009/29/EG is bij de wet van 19 april 2012 met de titel “herziening EG-richtlijn handel in broeikasgasemissierechten” geïmplementeerd. De memorie van toelichting bij deze wet houdt onder meer het volgende in:19

  1. 5.  EU-plafond

    1. 5.1.  Inleiding

      In fase I en II van het ETS hadden de lidstaten elk afzonderlijk een emissieplafond. De berekening van de toewijzing van emissierechten vond ook op nationaal niveau plaats door middel van nationale toewijzingsplannen (National Allocation Plan; hierna: NAP). Deze aanpak sloot aan bij de nationale Kyotoverplichtingen. In fase III is sprake van een Europees plafond en wordt de toewijzing van rechten ook sterk Europees gereguleerd. Op grond van artikel 9 van richtlijn 2003/87 is er een absolute hoeveelheid emissierechten voor de gehele EU (hierna: EU-plafond). De EU heeft zich ten doel gesteld om de emissie van broeikasgassen te verlagen in 2020 met ten minste 20% ten opzichte van 1990. Er is voor 1990 gekozen, omdat dit het basisjaar is voor Kyoto. Deze doelstelling heeft betrekking op alle sectoren, dus zowel de sectoren die onder het ETS vallen als de sectoren die niet onder dat systeem vallen (hierna: non-ETS sectoren). Voorbeeld van een non-ETS sector is de gebouwde omgeving. De doelstelling ten opzichte van 1990 is te vertalen in een doelstelling ten opzichte van 2005 en correspondeert dan met een reductie van 14% in 2020 ten opzichte van 2005. Deze vertaling is nodig, omdat 2005 het beginjaar voor het ETS is. Pas vanaf dat jaar zijn in het ETS geverifieerde gegevens bekend. Deze totale doelstelling is verdeeld over de ETS- en non-ETS sectoren. Voor de non-ETS sectoren is de reductie bepaald op -10% ten opzichte van 2005 en voor de ETS-sectoren op 21% ten opzichte van 2005. Het ETS-doel van -21% wil zeggen dat alle sectoren onder het ETS tezamen in 2020 tot een reductie moeten komen van 21% ten opzichte van 2005. Deze doelstellingen van -10% en -21% gelden dus voor fase III van het ETS. De non-ETS doelstellingen zijn verdeeld over de verschillende lidstaten. Nederland heeft een reductieverplichting van 16% ten opzichte van het niveau in 2005. Ter vergelijking zijn in onderstaand schema van een aantal andere lidstaten de reductieverplichtingen aangegeven.[1]

      In onderstaande figuur is deze doelstelling weergegeven.

Figuur 1:  Uitsplitsing EU-doel 2020 in ETS en non-ETS

2.71.  In het “Werkprogramma Nieuwe energie voor het klimaat van het project Schoon en Zuinig” uit 2007, waarin het toenmalige kabinet zijn klimaatbeleid heeft uiteengezet, is als klimaatdoelstelling voor 2020 een reductie met 30% ten opzichte van 1990 opgenomen. Dat betekent volgens het rapport dat in 2020 een emissieplafond geldt van 150 Mt CO2eq per jaar. In het rapport is onder meer opgenomen:

“Klimaatverandering noopt tot handelen, want het is bedreigend voor onze veiligheid, de voedselvoorziening, de waterhuishouding en voor de biodiversiteit. Het kabinet zet in dit werkprogramma dan ook krachtig in op ambitieuze klimaatdoelen: een reductie van de uitstoot van broeikasgassen van 30% in 2020 (ten opzichte van 1990) is nodig, bij voorkeur in Europees verband (…). De Europese doelstelling is -20% broeikasgasreductie, indien er geen mondiaal akkoord komt. Gezien de Nederlandse doelstelling van -30% is de kans aanwezig dat dit een tekort veroorzaakt bij het behalen van het overall Nederlandse doel. Indien Europese besluitvorming leidt tot een tekort in de reductiedoelstelling die Nederland zich heeft gesteld, zal het kabinet bezien of het tot een oplossing kan komen met andere landen die in een vergelijkbare positie zitten, omdat ze ook hoge nationale reductiedoelstellingen hebben geformuleerd. Lukt dat niet dan zal een deel van het reductietekort door de overheid worden ingekocht (…) en zal in overleg met de sectoren herijking plaatsvinden van de reductiedoelstelling van sectoren.”

2.72.  In een brief van 29 april 2008 van de toenmalige ministers van Volkshuisvesting, Ruimtelijke Ordening en Milieubeheer en voor Ontwikkelingssamenwerking aan de Tweede Kamer over de klimaatconferentie op Bali is onder meer het volgende vermeld:

“(…) Ten eerste blijft Nederland het uitgangspunt hanteren dat de gemiddelde wereldwijde temperatuurstijging tot maximaal 2 graden boven het pre-industriële niveau moet worden beperkt. Dit om de gevolgen van klimaatverandering zo beheersbaar mogelijk te houden. Ten tweede blijft het van belang dat de industrielanden het voortouw nemen, door zich te verbinden tot een gezamenlijke vermindering van hun broeikasgasemissies tegen 2020, in de orde van grootte van 30 procent ten opzichte van 1990. Het derde element is de notie dat in een post-2012 regime de deelname van landen moet worden verbreed. De inzet van Nederland blijft gericht op afspraken waarin ook de ontwikkelingslanden — zeker de grote en economische snel groeiende — tastbare inspanningen leveren en in sommige gevallen doelstellingen op zich nemen, afhankelijk van hun verschillende verantwoordelijkheden en capaciteiten. Alleen dan zal het mogelijk zijn om de mondiale emissies binnen 10 tot 15 jaar te stabiliseren en vervolgens voldoende omlaag te brengen. (…)

De 13e Conferentie van Partijen bij het VN-Klimaatverdrag vond van 3–14 december jl. op Bali, Indonesië plaats. Nederland werd in de onderhandelingen en het High Level Segment vertegenwoordigd door minister Cramer. In deze hoedanigheid heeft zij deelgenomen aan de ministeriële EU-coördinatie en heeft zij de plenaire sessie van de CoP toegesproken. In haar verklaring heeft zij de rijke landen opgeroepen hun broeikasgasuitstoot met tussen 25 en 40 procent te reduceren in 2020 en meer aandacht te geven aan adaptatie-, ontbossings- en technologiefondsen in ontwikkelingslanden. (…)”

2.73.  Met een brief van 12 oktober 2009 met als onderwerp “onderhandelingsinzet Kopenhagen en appreciatie Commissiemededeling klimaatfinanciering” heeft de toenmalige minister van Volkshuisvesting, Ruimtelijke Ordening en Milieubeheer onder meer het volgende aan de Tweede Kamer bericht:

“Hoofdlijnen krachtenveld

De kern van de onderhandelingen gaat over de bekende driehoek van de klimaatonderhandelingen: reductiedoelstellingen van ontwikkelde landen, mitigatieacties door ontwikkelingslanden en financiering.

Het totaal van emissiereducties dat de ontwikkelde landen tot nu toe hebben aangeboden, blijft nog onvoldoende om de 25–40% reductie in 2020 te bereiken, die nodig is om op een geloofwaardig traject te blijven om de 2 graden doelstelling binnen bereik te houden. (…)”

2.74.  In 2013 heeft het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu een Klimaatagenda (“Klimaatagenda: weerbaar, welvarend en groen”) opgesteld. In het tweede hoofdstuk, “De aanpak”, is het volgende opgenomen:20

  1. 2.1  De Nederlandse inzet wereldwijd

    (…) Mondiale klimaatafspraken in een snel veranderende wereld

    Het klimaatprobleem vraagt om een internationale aanpak (…). De statische afspraken van de afgelopen jaren met zeer verschillende opgaven voor ontwikkelde en ontwikkelingslanden passen niet meer bij de huidige dynamische situatie van snel groeiende economieën, waaronder Brazilië, Zuid-Afrika en China. Deze veranderende verhoudingen vragen om een nieuwe effectievere mondiale aanpak om zoveel mogelijk partijen, waaronder overheden, bedrijfsleven en het maatschappelijk middenveld te betrekken. Vrijwel alle landen bestrijden de klimaatverandering. Al leveren de opgetelde inspanningen nog niet het gewenste resultaat op om binnen de 2 graden temperatuurstijging te blijven. De inspanningen van landen als China en de Verenigde Staten zijn essentieel om vooruitgang te boeken. (…)

2.3  De nationale inzet: heldere doelen en kaders

Deels door beleid en deels als gevolg van de recessie dalen inmiddels de broeikasgasemissies in Nederland nadat deze jarenlang zijn gestegen (…). Nederland is daarmee op weg om de doelen te halen die het voor 2008–2012 (Kyoto) en voor 2020 internationaal is aangegaan.[20] De EU-doelstelling voor 2020 voor de sectoren die niet onder het ETS vallen, zal volgens de ramingen ruim worden gehaald zonder dat aankoop van rechten nodig is. Met het halen van de afgesproken doelen is overigens lang niet geborgd dat we voldoende op koers liggen voor de op de langere termijn benodigde emissiereducties. (…) Met het aangekondigde beleid uit het SEREnergieakkoord en deze Klimaatagenda beoogt het kabinet te zorgen voor de benodigde extra versnelling die in Nederland nodig is op weg naar een klimaatneutrale economie in 2050.

Mitigatiedoelen

De Nederlandse inzet in de EU is een doel van ten minste 40% CO2-reductie in 2030. (…)

2.75.  Op 6 september 2013 hebben de Staat en ruim veertig organisaties het “Energieakkoord voor duurzame groei” gesloten. Met dit akkoord is beoogd de volgende doelen te realiseren:

  • —  een besparing van het finale energieverbruik met gemiddeld 1,5% per jaar;

  • —  100 petajoule aan energiebesparing in het finale energieverbruik van Nederland per 2020;

  • —  een toename van het aandeel van hernieuwbare energieopwekking (nu ruim 4%) naar 14% in 2020;

  • —  een verdere stijging van dit aandeel naar 16% in 2023;

  • —  ten minste 15.000 voltijdsbanen, voor een belangrijk deel in de eerstkomende jaren te creëren.

2.76.  In een brief van 19 september 2013 heeft de staatssecretaris van Infrastructuur en Milieu aan de Tweede Kamer het volgende gemeld:

“(…)

  • —  Kern is dat Nederland pleit voor een broeikasgasreductie van ten minste door de Commissie in het groenboek voorgestelde 40% ten opzichte van 1990 in 2030 (…).

  • —  Nederland acht een structurele versterking van het Europese emissiehandelssysteem (ETS) nodig en pleit er zodoende voor het emissieplafond na 2020 aan te scherpen en af te stemmen op de Europese reductiedoelstellingen voor 2030 en 2050. (…)

    1. 1.  Welke lessen uit het kader voor 2020 en uit de huidige stand van het energiesysteem van de EU moeten het zwaarste meetellen bij het ontwerpen van het beleid voor 2030?

      Volgens analyses uitgevoerd door de Commissie wijkt de Europese Unie met het 20% CO2-reductiedoel af van het meest kosteneffectieve pad naar de doelstelling van 80–95% in 2050. Het doel van de Europese Unie om de broeikasgasuitstoot met 20% te reduceren is binnen handbereik. De Europese Unie heeft niet besloten tot ophoging naar het voorwaardelijke doel van 30%, mede omdat er geen overeenstemming is of er aan de geformuleerde voorwaarde — een significante reductie door andere grote economieën — is voldaan (…). De Europese Unie zou met het klimaaten energieraamwerk voor 2030 de meest kosteneffectieve weg naar een koolstofarme economie in 2050 terug moeten vinden.”

2.77.  Met een brief van 26 september 2014 heeft de staatsecretaris van Infrastructuur en Milieu, naar aanleiding van een analyse van Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland (ECN) en PBL van de gevolgen voor Nederland van het door de Europese Commissie voorgestelde beleidskader voor klimaat en energie voor 2030 en de daarin vervatte doelstellingen, de Tweede Kamer het volgende bericht:

“Wat betreft het CO2-reductiedoel voor de niet-ETS sectoren geldt dat de lastenverdeling tussen lidstaten in de Europese onderhandelingen een belangrijk onderwerp van discussie zal zijn. Afhankelijk van het gehanteerde criterium voor de lastenverdeling resulteert dit voor Nederland in een reductiepercentage van 28% tot 48% CO2-reductie in de niet-ETS sectoren in 2030. ECN en PBL geven aan dat de bijbehorende kosten in het rapport met onzekerheden zijn omgeven: de bandbreedte van het emissieniveau in de referentiesituatie is bijvoorbeeld al +/-9 Mton en de onzekerheid in de gegevens voor de berekeningen komen daar nog bovenop. Ten aanzien van de inspanningen voor Nederland bij verschillende reductieopgaven voor niet-ETS sectoren constateren de onderzoekbureaus het volgende:

  • —  Op nationaal niveau is het realiseren van een niet-ETS reductiedoel tot 33% en een aansluitend doel voor hernieuwbare energie van 20% en 12% besparing in 2030 mogelijk met bestaand beleid.

  • —  De kosten bij een niet-ETS doel in de bandbreedte 33–38% en een aansluitend doel voor hernieuwbare energie van 21% en 12% energiebesparing zijn € 80 miljoen – € 200 miljoen per jaar.

  • —  Hogere doelen voor niet-ETS gaan voor Nederland gepaard met sterk oplopende kosten tot € 870 – € 1.490 miljoen per jaar bij 43% en € 5 – € 15 miljard bij 48%.”

2.78.  Met een brief van 24 februari 2015 heeft de staatsecretaris van Infrastructuur en Milieu de geannoteerde agenda van de Milieuraad aan de Tweede Kamer toegezonden. Daarin is onder meer het volgende vermeld:

De weg naar de VN-Klimaatconferentie Parijs (COP21/CMP11)

Gedachtewisseling en aanname van de voorgenomen nationaal bepaalde bijdrage voor de EU

(…)

Nederlandse positie en krachtenveld

De Nederlandse inzet is om een ambitieus mondiaal klimaatakkoord te bereiken waar iedereen aan mee doet. Dat geldt voor landen, maar ook voor bedrijven, steden en het maatschappelijk middenveld waarmee we samenwerken naar een klimaatneutrale wereld. Het akkoord zal voldoende flexibiliteit moeten bieden aan landen om naar vermogen bij te kunnen dragen. Dat betekent niet dat het nieuwe akkoord vrijblijvend zal zijn. Landen zullen moeten monitoren, rapporteren en de resultaten moeten worden getoetst en besproken. Vervolgens moeten we landen uitdagen de ambitie te verhogen, om de mondiale temperatuurstijging tot 2 graden te beperken. Nederland onderschrijft daarvoor de EU-doelstelling van 80–95% afname van broeikasgassen in 2050 ten opzichte van 1990. In oktober 2014 heeft de Europese Raad voor 2030 een bindend doel van ten minste 40% broeikasgasreductie vastgesteld dat hiervoor als tussenstap dient.”

HET GESCHIL

3.1.  Samengevat houdt de vordering van Urgenda, na de wijziging van haar eis, in dat de rechtbank bij vonnis uitvoerbaar bij voorraad:

voor recht verklaart dat:

  1. (1)  door de grote uitstoot wereldwijd van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer de aarde opwarmt en volgens beste wetenschappelijke inzichten een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering zal ontstaan als die uitstoot niet sterk en snel zal worden verminderd;

  2. (2)  de gevaarlijke klimaatverandering die ontstaat bij een opwarming van de aarde met 2 °C of meer, althans met ongeveer 4 °C, ten opzichte van het pre-industriële tijdperk, die volgens beste wetenschappelijk inzichten verwacht wordt bij de huidige emissietrends, grote groepen mensen en mensenrechten wereldwijd bedreigt;

  3. (3)  van alle landen die een significante hoeveelheid broeikasgassen uitstoten in de atmosfeer, de uitstoot van Nederland per hoofd van de bevolking tot de hoogste ter wereld behoort;

  4. (4)  het gezamenlijke volume van de huidige jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen onrechtmatig is;

  5. (5)  de Staat verantwoordelijk is voor het gezamenlijke volume van de Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen;

  6. (6)  primair: de Staat onrechtmatig handelt indien hij niet uiterlijk per ultimo 2020 het gezamenlijke volume van de jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen heeft verminderd of heeft doen verminderen met 40%, althans ten minste 25%, ten opzichte van het jaar 1990;

    subsidiair: de Staat onrechtmatig handelt indien hij niet uiterlijk per ultimo 2030 het gezamenlijke volume van de jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen heeft verminderd of heeft doen verminderen met ten minste 40% ten opzichte van het jaar 1990;

en voorts de Staat beveelt om:

  1. (7)  primair: het gezamenlijk volume van de jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen zodanig te (doen) beperken dat het gezamenlijke volume van die emissies per ultimo 2020 met 40%, althans met minimaal 25%, zal zijn verminderd ten opzichte van het jaar 1990;

    subsidiair: het gezamenlijk volume van de jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen zodanig te (doen) beperken dat het gezamenlijke volume van die emissies per ultimo 2030 met ten minste 40% zal zijn verminderd ten opzichte van het jaar 1990;

  2. (8)  op eerste verzoek van Urgenda, op een door deze te bepalen en ten minste twee weken tevoren aan de Staat op te geven datum, in maximaal zes door Urgenda aan te wijzen landelijke dagbladen, paginagroot en paginavullend en door middel van logo’s of andere tekenen duidelijk en direct herkenbaar als afkomstig van de Staat of de regering, de in de conclusie van repliek tevens wijziging van eis opgenomen tekst of een door de rechtbank in goede justitie vast te stellen tekst te (doen) publiceren;

  3. (9)  de in (8) bedoelde tekst met ingang van de daar bedoelde publicatiedatum en tevens gedurende twee aaneengesloten weken te publiceren en gepubliceerd te houden op de homepage van de website www.rijksoverheid.nl, en wel zo dat deze tekst zonder dat nog enig aanklikken nodig is, bij iedere bezoeker van de homepage duidelijk leesbaar in beeld verschijnt en weggeklikt moet worden alvorens andere pagina’s van die website bezocht kunnen worden;

    met

  4. (10)  de veroordeling van de Staat in de kosten van deze procedure.

3.2.  Urgenda legt aan deze vorderingen, kort samengevat, het volgende ten grondslag.

Het huidige wereldwijde emissieniveau van broeikasgassen, in het bijzonder CO2, leidt of dreigt te leiden tot een opwarming van de aarde met meer dan 2 °C en daarmee tot een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering met zeer ernstige en zelfs potentieel catastrofale gevolgen. Een dergelijk emissieniveau is jegens haar onrechtmatig, want in strijd met de zorgvuldigheid die in het maatschappelijk verkeer betaamt, en het vormt een inbreuk op, dan wel is in strijd met, de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM, waarop zowel Urgenda zelf als degenen die zij vertegenwoordigt een beroep kunnen doen. De Nederlandse broeikasgasemissies dragen additioneel bij aan de (dreigende) gevaarlijke klimaatverandering. Het aandeel van de Nederlandse emissies in het wereldwijde emissieniveau is, zowel in absolute getallen maar meer nog per hoofd van de bevolking, bovenmatig. Dit maakt dat de Nederlandse broeikasgasemissies onrechtmatig zijn. Het feit dat emissies vanaf het grondgebied van de Staat plaatsvinden en de Staat als soevereine macht die emissies kan beheersen, controleren en reguleren, brengt mee dat de Staat “systeemverantwoordelijk” is voor het totale Nederlandse emissieniveau van broeikasgassen en het daarvoor gevoerde beleid. Gelet hierop kan en moet aan de Staat worden toegerekend dat het Nederlandse emissieniveau (substantieel) bijdraagt aan het medeveroorzaken van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering en kan de Staat (gelet op onder meer artikel 21 Gw) worden aangesproken op deze medeveroorzaking. Bovendien heeft de Staat naar nationaal en internationaal recht (waaronder het volkenrechtelijke “no harm”-beginsel, het VN Klimaatverdrag en het VWEU) een individuele verplichting en verantwoordelijkheid om ter voorkoming van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering zorg te dragen voor een reductie van het Nederlandse emissieniveau. Deze zorgplicht houdt primair in dat in Nederland in ieder geval in 2020 reeds een reductie van 25 tot 40% ten opzichte van het emissieniveau van 1990 gerealiseerd is. Een reductie van deze omvang is niet alleen noodzakelijk om uitzicht te houden op een beperking van de opwarming van de aarde tot (minder dan) 2 °C, maar is bovendien het meest kosteneffectief. Subsidiair dient Nederland in ieder geval in 2030 een reductie van 40% ten opzichte van 1990 gerealiseerd te hebben. De Staat schiet met het huidige klimaatbeleid ernstig tekort in deze zorgplicht en handelt dusdoende onrechtmatig.

3.3.  De Staat betoogt — ook kort samengevat — het volgende. Urgenda is gedeeltelijk niet-ontvankelijk, namelijk voor zover zij opkomt voor de rechten en belangen van huidige of toekomstige generaties in andere landen. Afgezien daarvan zijn de vorderingen niet toewijsbaar, omdat geen sprake is van (een reële dreiging van) aan de Staat toe te rekenen onrechtmatig handelen jegens Urgenda, terwijl ook overigens niet is voldaan aan de vereisten van de artikelen 6:162 BW en 3:296 BW. De Staat erkent de noodzaak van de beperking van de mondiale temperatuurstijging tot (minder dan) 2 °C, maar zijn inspanningen zijn er juist op gericht dit doel te bereiken. Het huidige en toekomstige klimaatbeleid, dat niet los kan worden gezien van de internationale afspraken en de door de Europese Unie geformuleerde normen en (emissie)doelstellingen, maakt dit naar verwachting haalbaar. Er is geen — uit nationaal of internationaal recht af te leiden — rechtsplicht van de Staat om maatregelen te nemen waardoor de gevorderde reductiedoelstellingen worden gehaald. De uitvoering van het Nederlandse klimaatbeleid, dat mitigatie- en adaptiemaatregelen omvat, maakt geen inbreuk op de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM. Toewijzing van (een deel van) de bevelsvorderingen is bovendien in strijd met de aan de Staat toekomende beleidsvrijheid. Ook zou daardoor het stelsel van machtenscheiding worden doorkruist en zou de onderhandelingspositie van de Staat in de internationale politiek worden geschaad.

3.4.  Op de stellingen van partijen wordt hierna, voor zover van belang, nader ingegaan.

DE BEOORDELING

A.  Inleiding

4.1.  Deze zaak gaat in de kern over de vraag of de Staat ten opzichte van Urgenda de rechtsplicht heeft om de uitstoot van broeikasgassen — in het bijzonder CO2 — verder te beperken dan uit de voornemens van de Nederlandse regering, namens de Staat, voortvloeit. Urgenda betoogt dat de Staat geen adequaat klimaatbeleid voert en daarmee in strijd handelt met zijn zorgplicht tegenover haar en degenen die zij vertegenwoordigt en meer in het algemeen de Nederlandse samenleving. Urgenda stelt ook dat de Staat, door het Nederlandse aandeel in het klimaatbeleid, de internationale gemeenschap ten onrechte blootstelt aan het risico van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering, met als gevolg ernstige en onomkeerbare schade voor gezondheid en milieu. Op deze hier kort samengevatte gronden vordert Urgenda, behalve enkele verklaringen voor recht, een bevel aan de Staat om het gezamenlijke volume van de jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen zodanig te (doen) beperken dat deze emissies in 2020 met 40%, en minimaal met 25%, zullen zijn verminderd in vergelijking met het jaar 1990. Voor het geval dat deze vordering niet slaagt wenst zij een bevel om dit volume te beperken met 40% in 2030, ook weer ten opzichte van 1990.

4.2.  De Staat betoogt hiertegenover dat Nederland — gegeven ook de afspraken in Europees verband — een adequaat klimaatbeleid voert. Daarom, en om vele andere redenen, kunnen de vorderingen van Urgenda volgens hem niet slagen. Een centrale stelling hierbij is dat de Staat in rechte niet gedwongen kan worden tot het voeren van een ander klimaatbeleid. In het navolgende zullen, afhankelijk van de context, de begrippen “de Staat” en “Nederland” beide worden gebruikt. De aanduiding “de Staat” verwijst naar de rechtspersoon die partij is in deze procedure, de aanduiding “Nederland” naar deze zelfde entiteit in internationaal verband. De regering is het orgaan van de Staat dat hierbij handelend optreedt.

4.3.  De rechtbank ziet zich geconfronteerd met een geschil waarin lastige en veelomvattende “klimaattechnische” vragen aan de orde zijn. De rechtbank beschikt niet zelf over deskundigheid op dit terrein. Zij zal zich baseren op hetgeen partijen in dit opzicht hebben overgelegd en tussen hen vaststaat. Dit betreft zowel de huidige stand van de wetenschap als (andere) gegevens die de Staat heeft erkend of ook zelf voor juist houdt. Veel gegevens van deze aard zijn vermeld in onderdeel 2 van dit vonnis (“De feiten”). Een analyse van deze gegevens, die daarbij soms worden herhaald, zal leiden tot de vaststelling van de ernst van het probleem van klimaatverandering. Op basis daarvan beoordeelt de rechtbank de vordering en de daartegen aangevoerde verweren. Aan deze analyse gaat een beoordeling van de ontvankelijkheid van Urgenda vooraf. Als zij niet in de positie verkeert om de Staat aan te spreken over de kwesties die onderwerp van deze zaak vormen, komt de rechtbank immers niet toe aan een inhoudelijke beoordeling van de vordering. Deze (eventuele) verdere beoordeling omvat alle nadere vragen, waaronder die naar het al dan niet bestaan van een rechtsplicht van de Staat ten opzichte van Urgenda en de vraag of het opleggen van het gevorderde bevel aan de Staat binnen de mogelijkheden van de rechter valt.

B.  De ontvankelijkheid van Urgenda (optredend voor zichzelf)

4.4.  Uit artikel 3:303 BW volgt dat een (rechts)persoon uitsluitend een eis kan instellen bij de civiele rechter als hij een voldoende eigen, persoonlijk, belang heeft bij de eis. Op grond van artikel 3:305a BW mag een stichting of vereniging met volledige rechtsbevoegdheid ook een eis instellen die strekt tot de bescherming van algemene belangen of de collectieve belangen van andere personen, voor zover die stichting of vereniging op grond van haar statutaire doelstelling de bescherming van deze algemene of collectieve belangen behartigt. Daarbij geldt wel de voorwaarde dat de rechtspersoon in kwestie zijn eis pas aan de rechter kan voorleggen als hij, in de gegeven omstandigheden, voldoende heeft getracht om door overleg met de gedaagde partij te bereiken dat aan zijn eisen wordt tegemoetgekomen (lid 2).

4.5.  Het standpunt van de Staat ten aanzien van de ontvankelijkheid van Urgenda voor zover deze partij voor zichzelf optreedt, laat zich als volgt samenvatten. De Staat betwist niet dat Urgenda, gelet op de belangen die zij krachtens haar statuten behartigt, ontvankelijk is wanneer zij namens de huidige generaties Nederlanders opkomt tegen de emissies van broeikasgassen vanaf het Nederlandse grondgebied. De Staat bestrijdt evenmin het standpunt van Urgenda dat de (reductie)vordering die zij in deze procedure tegen de Staat instelt, in beginsel behoort tot het soort vorderingen dat de Nederlandse wetgever toelaatbaar vindt en met artikel 3:305a BW mogelijk heeft willen maken. Ten aanzien van de vraag of Urgenda ontvankelijk is voor zover zij opkomt voor de belangen van toekomstige generaties Nederlanders (en dat “tot in het oneindige”), refereert de Staat zich aan het oordeel van de rechtbank. De Staat stelt dat Urgenda niet ontvankelijk is voor zover zij opkomt voor rechten of belangen van huidige of toekomstige generaties in andere landen.

4.6.  De rechtbank overweegt hierover als volgt. De vorderingen van Urgenda tegen de Staat behoren in beginsel inderdaad tot het soort vorderingen dat de Nederlandse wetgever toelaatbaar acht en met artikel 3:305a BW mogelijk heeft willen maken. In de memorie van toelichting is overwogen dat een vordering van een milieuorganisatie ter bescherming van het milieu, zonder dat een aanwijsbare groep van personen bescherming behoeft, in de voorgestelde regeling ontvankelijk zou zijn.21

4.7.  In artikel 2 van de statuten van Urgenda staat dat zij streeft naar een duurzamere samenleving, “te starten in Nederland”. Dit geeft blijk van — zoals zij terecht betoogt — een prioritering, niet van een beperking tot het Nederlandse grondgebied. De belangen die Urgenda zich aantrekt, zijn blijkens haar statutaire doelstelling aldus in eerste instantie, maar niet uitsluitend, Nederlandse belangen. Daarbij geldt dat het begrip “duurzame samenleving” naar zijn aard een internationale (en mondiale) dimensie kent. Nu Urgenda op grond van haar statuten het belang van een “duurzame samenleving” behartigt, komt zij op voor een belang dat naar zijn aard de landsgrenzen overschrijdt. Urgenda kan daarom het feit dat de Nederlandse emissies ook gevolgen hebben voor personen buiten de Nederlandse landsgrenzen, mede ten grondslag leggen aan haar vorderingen, die immers tegen dergelijke emissies zijn gericht.

4.8  Het begrip “duurzame samenleving” kent verder een intergenerationele dimensie. Dit komt onder meer tot uitdrukking in de definitie van “duurzaamheid” in het in 2.3 genoemde Brundtland-rapport:

“Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

Wanneer Urgenda opkomt voor het recht van (niet alleen de huidige, maar ook) toekomstige generaties op beschikbaarheid van natuurlijke hulpbronnen en een veilig en gezond leefklimaat, streeft zij dus evenzeer het belang van een duurzame samenleving na. Dit belang van een duurzame samenleving wordt met zoveel woorden genoemd in de rechtsnorm waarop Urgenda zich beroept voor de bescherming tegen activiteiten die (in haar visie) niet “duurzaam” zijn en dreigen te leiden tot ernstige gevaren voor ecosystemen en menselijke samenlevingen. Hierbij is mede te verwijzen naar artikel 2 van het VN Klimaatverdrag. Het beroep van Urgenda op de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM ligt in het verlengde van haar statutaire doelstellingen. Ook deze bepalingen strekken immers tot bescherming van de belangen waarvoor zij opkomt.

4.9.  Nu ook niet in geschil is dat Urgenda heeft voldaan aan de eis van artikel 3:305a lid 2 BW dat zij voldoende heeft getracht het gevorderde te bereiken door het voeren van overleg met de Staat, komt de rechtbank tot de slotsom dat Urgenda voor zover zij voor zichzelf optreedt, in volle omvang ontvankelijk is in haar vorderingen.

4.10.  Ten aanzien van de ontvankelijkheid van Urgenda volstaat de rechtbank voorlopig met dit oordeel. In hetgeen hierna volgt, zal de rechtbank zich vooralsnog uitsluitend richten op de positie van Urgenda zelf. Op de positie van de (886) volmachtgevers voor wie Urgenda tevens opkomt, zal zij aan het slot ingaan.

C.  De stand van de klimaatwetenschap en het klimaatbeleid

Het VN Klimaatverdrag en het IPCC

4.11.  Al ruim voor de jaren negentig van de vorige eeuw was er in de wetenschap een groeiend besef dat als gevolg van door mensen veroorzaakte (“antropogene”) uitstoot van broeikasgassen de temperatuur in de wereld mogelijk stijgt en dat dit catastrofale gevolgen kan hebben voor mens en milieu. Dit besef heeft geleid tot het VN Klimaatverdrag in 1992, waarvan het in 2.37 aangehaalde artikel 2 als doel vermeldt: het bereiken van een stabilisatie van de concentraties van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer, waarbij gevaarlijke antropogene verstoring van het klimaatsysteem wordt voorkomen. Zoals gezegd hebben inmiddels 195 landen, waaronder Nederland, en ook de EU deze doelstelling onderschreven.

4.12.  In het VN Klimaatverdrag is voorzien in de oprichting van het IPCC als wereldwijd kennisinstituut. In de rapporten van het IPCC is de kennis van honderden wetenschappers gebundeld. De rapporten representeren in zeer belangrijke mate de stand van de klimaatwetenschap. Het IPCC is tegelijkertijd een intergouvernementele organisatie. In de COPbesluiten die de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag tijdens hun klimaatconferenties nemen, worden de bevindingen van het IPCC tot uitgangspunt genomen. Ook de Europese en Nederlandse besluitvorming over het te voeren klimaatbeleid berust in klimaattechnische zin op de bevindingen van het IPCC. De rechtbank beschouwt daarom — met partijen — deze bevindingen als een gegeven.

De rapporten van het IPCC

4.13.  De rapporten van het IPCC houden rekening met wetenschappelijke onzekerheid. Dit begrip omvat de vraag in hoeverre het mogelijk is om op basis van de beschikbare natuurwetenschappelijke kennis uitsluitsel te geven over de waarschijnlijkheid dat een negatief effect zal intreden. In de klimaatwetenschap moet worden bepaald (i) in hoeverre de huidige antropogene broeikasgasuitstoot de toekomstige broeikasgasconcentratie zal verhogen en (ii) of daaruit, gegeven vele verdere omstandigheden, een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering volgt. Het IPCC vermeldt in zijn rapporten telkens met welke mate van (on)zekerheid zijn constateringen en bevindingen zijn omgeven.

4.14.  In AR4/2007 en AR5/2013 heeft het IPCC vastgesteld dat er wereldwijd een klimaatverandering plaatsvindt en dat het uiterst waarschijnlijk is dat de mens, in het bijzonder door de verbranding van fossiele brandstoffen (olie, gas, kolen) en door ontbossing, de belangrijkste oorzaak is van de waargenomen opwarming sinds het midden van de negentiende eeuw. In AR4/2007 is voorts vastgesteld dat bij een temperatuurstijging van meer dan 2 °C boven het pre-industriële niveau een gevaarlijke, onomkeerbare klimaatverandering ontstaat, die een bedreiging vormt voor het milieu en de mens. Dit heeft geresulteerd in de formulering van de eerder genoemde tweegradendoelstelling. Het IPCC is in AR5/2013 niet teruggekomen van deze doelstelling. De partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag, waaronder zoals gezegd Nederland en de EU, hebben tijdens de klimaatconferentie in 2010 (Cancun Agreements) deze bevindingen expliciet erkend. De rechtbank stelt daarmee vast dat de tweegradendoelstelling wereldwijd tot uitgangspunt wordt genomen voor de ontwikkeling van het klimaatbeleid. Daarbij geldt overigens een restrictie voor enkele landen in de Stille Oceaan, zoals Tuvalu en Fiji, waarvoor een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering, met het risico op algehele verdwijning van hun grondgebieden, waarschijnlijk al bij een temperatuurstijging met 1,5 °C optreedt. Daarom hebben de verdragsluitende partijen in Cancun bepaald dat “zicht moet worden gehouden” op een klimaatdoelstelling van 1,5 °C.

4.15.  De hier genoemde IPCC-rapporten vermelden ook dat ter voorkoming van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering de antropogene broeikasgasuitstoot sterk moet dalen. Ook dit is erkend door de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag, onder meer tijdens de klimaatconferentie in 2007 (Bali Action Plan) en opnieuw in 2010 (Cancun). Uit AR5/2013, ondersteund door publicaties van andere kennisinstituten, zoals EDGAR (zie 2.25) en UNEP (zie 2.29), blijkt dat de wereldwijde antropogene uitstoot van broeikasgassen toeneemt in plaats van afneemt. De rechtbank neemt ook deze gegevens als vaststaand aan.

4.16.  Tussen partijen is ook niet in geschil dat een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering ernstige gevolgen heeft op wereld- en lokaal niveau. Het IPCC rapporteert dat door de opwarming van de aarde het ijs op de Noord- en de Zuidpool en ook de gletsjers in de bergen smelten. Dat zal leiden tot een stijging van de zeespiegel. Daarnaast wordt verwacht dat door de opwarming van de oceanen zich meer orkanen zullen ontwikkelen, dat de woestijnen zich zullen uitbreiden en dat door de hitte vele diersoorten uitsterven. Dit laatste veroorzaakt een grote daling van de biodiversiteit. Mensen zullen van deze veranderingen in hun leefomgeving schade ondervinden, bijvoorbeeld door aantasting van de voedselproductie. Daarnaast zal de stijging van de temperatuur leiden tot hittesterfte, vooral bij ouderen en kinderen. De IPCC-rapporten vermelden ook dat reeds door de huidige temperatuurstijging schade ontstaat aan mens en milieu. De mede door Nederland aanvaarde tweegradendoelstelling strekt ertoe te voorkomen dat de klimaatverandering onomkeerbaar wordt: zonder ingrijpen zijn de hiervoor beschreven processen niet meer tegen te houden.

4.17.  De rapporten van het PBL en het KNMI beschrijven op basis van de IPCC-rapporten dat ook Nederland de komende eeuw te maken krijgt met gemiddeld hogere temperaturen, veranderende neerslagpatronen en een stijgende zeespiegel. De kans op hittegolven in de zomer neemt toe en neerslagextremen zullen vaker voorkomen. De stroomgebieden van de grote rivieren krijgen enerzijds te maken met meer extreme neerslag, anderzijds is in de zomer de kans op afname van de hoeveelheid aangevoerd water groot. Hoge rivierafvoer kan in combinatie met zeespiegelstijging en hoge waterstanden op zee vaker tot gevaarlijke situaties leiden in het benedenrivierengebied. Minder water in de zomer betekent onder meer grotere risico’s op verzilting in de kustzones en minder beschikbaar zoetwater voor de landbouw. Nederland gaat ook merken dat het klimaat elders in de wereld verandert. Sommige invoerproducten zullen duurder worden.22

4.18.  Het hier overwogene leidt tot de volgende tussenconclusie. Door de menselijke uitstoot van broeikasgassen treedt klimaatverandering op. Bij een temperatuurstijging van meer dan 2 °C ten opzichte van het pre-industriële niveau ontstaat een zeer gevaarlijke situatie voor de mens en het milieu. Het is daarom nodig om de concentratie van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer te stabiliseren. Dit vereist een vermindering van de huidige antropogene broeikasgasuitstoot.

4.19.  Gegeven de ernst van het probleem van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering is in de klimaatwetenschap onderzocht met welke mate van waarschijnlijkheid menselijke gedragingen van nu negatieve of positieve effecten hebben op toekomstige klimaatverandering. Daarbij bestaat wetenschappelijke onzekerheid over de vraag wanneer, waar en in welke exacte omvang, welke specifieke effecten zullen optreden, en ook over de effectiviteit en over eventuele negatieve neveneffecten van bepaalde voorzorgsmaatregelen. De klimaatwetenschap (het natuurwetenschappelijk onderzoek) richt zich daarom op risicoregulering: het bepalen van de gewenste omgangsvorm en de mogelijke nadelige effecten. Met het oog hierop schetsen de IPCC-rapporten verschillende scenario’s. Deze bieden inzicht in de gevolgen van een bepaalde uitstoot voor het klimaat en in de kosten voor het tot stand brengen van een bepaalde uitstoot. Daarbij wordt tevens onderzocht met welk scenario de tweegradendoelstelling het meest kosteneffectief (dat wil zeggen: op de meest doeltreffende wijze, ook gelet op de daaraan verbonden kosten) bereikbaar is.

Het maximale concentratieniveau van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer

4.20.  Het IPCC heeft in AR4/2007 vastgesteld dat voor het behalen van de tweegradendoelstelling de concentratie van broeikasgassen in de atmosfeer moet stabiliseren op 450 ppm. Dit scenario wordt hierna “het 450-scenario” genoemd. Tussen partijen is niet in geschil dat bij het 450-scenario de kans dat de klimaatdoelstelling wordt gehaald 50% is. De partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag hebben melding gemaakt van het 450-scenario door een verwijzing in het Bali Action Plan (het COPbesluit van 2007) naar AR4/2007. Een expliciete keuze voor het 450-scenario leidt de rechtbank uit deze verwijzing niet af. De genoemde passage (zie 2.16) toont aan dat de Verdragspartijen zich ten minste richten op een scenario waarbij de uitstoot wordt gestabiliseerd op een niveau van 450–550 ppm. Uit de processtukken blijkt dat de Europese instellingen in 2007 ervan zijn uitgegaan dat de broeikasgasconcentratie in de atmosfeer ruim onder de grens van 550 ppm diende te blijven en dat op lange termijn de concentratie moest stabiliseren op een niveau van ongeveer 450 ppm. Blijkens deze stukken zou dat dan betekenen dat de werelduitstoot in 2025 een piek bereikt en vervolgens tegen 2050 dient te dalen tot 50% (zie 2.60).

4.21.  In AR5/2013 heeft het IPCC een iets gunstiger schatting gemaakt van de kans dat bij het 450-scenario de klimaatdoelstelling wordt behaald. Zij heeft de kans toen bepaald op meer dan 66%. Wanneer wordt uitgegaan van een concentratieniveau van 500 ppm in 2100 is die kans volgens het IPCC meer dan 50%. Het concentratieniveau mag dan in die periode voor 2100 niet (tijdelijk) het niveau van 530 ppm overstijgen. De kans dat de klimaatdoelstelling in dat geval niet wordt gehaald is 33 tot 66%. Aangenomen wordt dat bij scenario’s met een concentratie van 530 tot 650 ppm de kans op het behalen van de klimaatdoelstelling minder dan 33% bedraagt. Uit de overgelegde stukken blijkt niet dat de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag op deze scenario’s expliciet hebben gereageerd.

4.22.  Uit de hier genoemde IPCC-rapporten concludeert de rechtbank dat met het oog op risicobeheer, wetenschappelijk bezien, sterke voorkeur bestaat voor het 450-scenario. Bij een 500-scenario ligt het risico veel hoger. Voor het behoud van een kans van 50% op het voorkomen van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering, mag naar de huidige stand van de wetenschap de concentratie CO2 in de atmosfeer in elk geval het niveau van 530 ppm niet overstijgen.

De reductiedoelstellingen

4.23.  Het IPCC heeft in AR4/2007 ook vastgesteld dat om te voorkomen dat het concentratieniveau het niveau van 450 ppm overstijgt, de wereldwijde uitstoot van CO2-eq sterk moet worden verminderd. Om een concentratieniveau van maximaal 450 ppm te bereiken, moet — met inachtneming van een billijke verdeling — de totale uitstoot door de Annex I-landen (waaronder Nederland en de EU als geheel) in 2020 25 tot 40% lager zijn dan de uitstoot in 1990. In 2050 dient de totale uitstoot van deze landen met 80 tot 95% ten opzichte van 1990 te zijn teruggebracht. De niet-Annex I-landen dienen hun broeikasgasuitstoot substantieel te minderen. Op wereldwijde schaal dient dit ertoe te leiden dat de uitstoot vóór 2015 daalt en dat in 2050 de uitstoot met 50% is gedaald ten opzichte van het jaar 2000.23

4.24.  In 2007 hebben de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag, met verwijzing naar AR4/2007, in het Bali Action Plan erkend dat “deep cuts” in de broeikasgasemissie dringend noodzakelijk zijn om gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen. De passage waarnaar hier wordt verwezen, vermeldt dat om het concentratieniveau in de atmosfeer onder 450–550 ppm te houden in 2020 een emissiereductie van 10–40% nodig is en in 2050 een reductie van 40–95%, telkens in vergelijking met het 1990-niveau. Tijdens de klimaatconferentie in Cancun in 2010 is in een besluit van de Ad hoc Working Group van Annex I-landen uitdrukkelijk erkend dat deze landen hun uitstoot in 2020 beperkt zullen moeten hebben met 25–40% ten opzichte van 1990. In dit besluit sporen de Annex I-landen zichzelf aan (“urges”) om hun reductiedoelstellingen hieraan aan te passen.

4.25.  In Europees verband heeft de Europese Raad naar aanleiding van AR4/2007 overwogen dat de ontwikkelde landen voorop moeten lopen door zich te verbinden aan een collectieve vermindering van hun broeikasgasemissies tegen 2020 in de orde van grootte van 30% ten opzichte van 1990. Volgens de Raad moeten deze landen dat ook doen om tegen 2050 hun emissies collectief te verminderen met 60 à 80% ten opzichte van 1990. De Europese Raad heeft daarom het streefcijfer vastgesteld op 30% reductie per 2020, op voorwaarde dat andere ontwikkelde landen en economisch meer gevorderde ontwikkelingslanden zich tot vergelijkbare emissiereducties verbinden. De Europese Raad verbindt zich daarom in internationaal opzicht tot een reductie van 20% in 2020 ten opzichte van 1990 en tot een reductie van 30% als de genoemde voorwaarde wordt vervuld. Aan deze voorwaarde is tot dusver niet voldaan, zodat in EU-verband de emissiereductiedoelstelling per 2020 nog altijd 20% bedraagt. In verschillende beleidsstukken van Europese instellingen is vermeld dat de 20%-reductiedoelstelling van de EU niet voldoet aan de volgens het IPCC vereiste doelstelling voor ontwikkelde landen, die immers is gericht op een reductie van 25–40% in 2020 en een reductie van 80–95% in 2050 (zie 2.58, 2.61, 2.63 en 2.64).

4.26.  Nederland heeft zich aanvankelijk, in de jaren 2007–2009, gericht op een klimaatbeleid dat is geënt op een reductiedoelstelling voor 2020 van 30% ten opzichte van 1990, en dus op een reductie die hoger lag dan de EU-doelstelling van 20%. Van deze reductiedoelstelling is later afgeweken. In deze procedure heeft de Staat verklaard dat het Nederlandse klimaatbeleid uitgaat van een minimumreductiedoelstelling van 16% in 2020 (ten opzichte van 2005) voor de niet-ETS-sectoren en 21% in 2020 (ten opzichte van 2005) voor de ETS-sectoren. Tijdens de pleitzitting heeft de Staat bevestigd dat de reductie voor deze beide sectoren tezamen in 2020 naar verwachting zal uitkomen op 14 tot 17% ten opzichte van 1990.

4.27.  Het IPCC heeft in AR5/2013 vastgesteld dat om in 2100 een concentratieniveau van 450 ppm te bereiken, de mondiale broeikasgasemissies in 2050 40% tot 70% lager moeten zijn dan in het jaar 2010. In 2100 moet het totaal aan emissies zijn teruggebracht tot nul of zelfs negatief zijn. Bij een concentratieniveau van 500 ppm wordt uitgegaan van een reductie van 25% tot 55% in 2050. Tijdens de klimaatconferentie in Durban (2011) is overeengekomen dat in 2015 een nieuw juridisch bindend klimaatverdrag of protocol moet worden afgesloten. Bij de klimaatconferentie in Lima (2014) zijn de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag overeengekomen dat zij hun eigen emissiereductiedoelstellingen zullen indienen voor de komende klimaatconferentie in Parijs.

4.28.  De EU heeft in 2014 bekendgemaakt dat zij voor 2030 een reductiecijfer nastreeft van 40% ten opzichte van het jaar 1990. Nederland ondersteunt de EU-reductiedoelstelling van 40% in 2030 en de EU-doelstelling van 80% in 2050, beide ten opzichte van het jaar 1990. De Staat heeft niet toegelicht welke reductiedoelstelling voor Nederland zal gelden.

4.29.  Het voorgaande leidt tot de nadere tussenconclusie dat, volgens de huidige stand van de wetenschap, voor het voorkomen van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering dient te worden uitgegaan van een 450-scenario, met een daarbij behorende reductiedoelstelling voor de Annex I-landen, waaronder Nederland en de EU als geheel, van 25–40% in 2020 en 80–95% in 2050. De EU en Nederland hebben deze bevinding als zodanig erkend en zich (aanvankelijk) toegelegd op een emissiereductiedoelstelling van 30%. De EU heeft zich echter niet tot meer willen verbinden dan een reductiedoelstelling van 20% en Nederland is daarin vanaf ongeveer 2010 meegegaan. Voor 2030 hebben de EU en Nederland zich een reductiedoelstelling van 40% gesteld; voor 2050 een reductiedoelstelling van 80%. Daarmee zou de reductiedoelstelling weer aansluiten bij de gestelde reductiedoelstelling van het IPCC in 2050 voor een 450-scenario.

Het effect van de reductiemaatregelen tot dusver

4.30.  Uit de EDGAR-database blijkt dat ondanks de getroffen maatregelen de uitstoot wereldwijd sterk toeneemt. Volgens de rapporten van het UNEP behalen de Annex I-landen niet de emissiereductiedoelstelling van 25–40% in 2020 en resteert een “budget” van ongeveer 1000 Gt. Het UNEP stelt vast dat er een kloof bestaat tussen enerzijds de reductie die nodig is om de klimaatdoelstelling te behalen en anderzijds de toegezegde reductie door de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag. Tegelijkertijd stelt het instituut vast dat het mogelijk is om in 2030 deze kloof alsnog te dichten.

Conclusies en nadere bepaling van de omvang van het geschil

4.31.  Het voorgaande leidt de rechtbank tot de volgende conclusies.

  1. — i)  In AR4/2007 is het 450-scenario noodzakelijk geacht om, volgens partijen, de kans op het halen van de tweegradendoelstelling niet lager te doen zijn dan 50% . In AR5/2013 is deze kans door het IPCC op 66% gesteld. Voor de Annex I-landen is voor het behalen van het 450-scenario een reductie nodig die leidt tot een uitstoot in 2020 van 25–40% beneden het niveau van 1990.

  2. — ii)  Nederland heeft in overeenstemming hiermee meegewerkt aan het besluit in Cancun (2010) waarin is vastgelegd dat de Annex I-landen minimaal een reductie van 25–40% moeten bereiken in 2020.

  3. — iii)  De EU heeft zich in internationaal opzicht verbonden aan een reductiedoelstelling voor 2020 van 20%, met een verhoging naar 30% (beide ten opzichte van 1990) indien andere Annex I-landen zich tot eenzelfde reductiedoelstelling verplichten. De norm van 20% voor de EU ligt onder de wetenschappelijk noodzakelijk geachte norm van 30%.

  4. — iv)  Nederland heeft zich gecommitteerd aan het streven van de EU om een doelstelling van 30% reductie in 2020 aan te gaan, mits de andere Annex I-landen daarin meegaan.

  5. — v)  Nederland is tot ongeveer 2010 uitgegaan van een reductiedoelstelling voor 2020 van 30% ten opzichte van 1990 en nadien van een reductiedoelstelling die is afgeleid van de EU-reductiedoelstelling van 20% en neerkomt op een totale reductie van naar verwachting 14–17% in 2020.

  6. — vi)  De Nederlandse reductiedoelstelling ligt daarmee onder de in de klimaatwetenschap en in het internationale klimaatbeleid noodzakelijk geachte norm, inhoudende dat ter voorkoming van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering een reductie in de uitstoot van broeikasgassen voor de Annex I-landen (waaronder Nederland) van 25–40% in 2020 nodig is om de tweegradendoelstelling te bereiken.

4.32  Uit het voorgaande vloeit voort dat het op dit moment hoogst waarschijnlijk is dat binnen enkele decennia een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering optreedt met onomkeerbare gevolgen voor mens en milieu. De Staat erkent op zichzelf dat dit een ernstig probleem is en ook dat het noodzakelijk is dit af te wenden door de broeikasgasuitstoot te mitigeren. Het debat van partijen richt zich in zoverre dan ook niet zozeer op de noodzaak tot mitigeren, maar op het tempo, althans de mate, waarin de Staat moet overgaan tot het reduceren van de broeikasgasuitstoot. Ter toelichting op de door haar nodig geachte reductiepercentages stelt Urgenda dat de Staat, door zich niet (meer) te richten op een reductie van 25–40% in 2020 maar slechts op een reductie van 40% in 2030 en een reductie van 80–95% in 2050, meer uitstoot dan wanneer hij zich aan de tussentijdse doelstelling van 25–40% reductie in 2020 zou houden. Urgenda verwijst hierbij naar de onderstaande grafieken (overgelegd bij pleidooi):

De eerste figuur — nader uitgewerkt in de tweede en derde figuur — toont volgens Urgenda aan dat bij een uitgestelde reductieroute meer wordt uitgestoten dan bij een keuze voor een gelijkmatige verdeling van de te leveren reductieinspanning over de gehele periode tot aan 2050 of voor een lineaire aanpak. Zij stelt dat de figuur tevens duidelijk maakt dat een uitstel van reductie (tot 2030 minder reduceren en vanaf dat jaar meer) in totaliteit tot een grotere emissie leidt en daarmee de kans op het overschrijden van het overgebleven “budget” doet toenemen. Urgenda stelt voorts dat het kosteneffectiever is om nu in te grijpen. Zij baseert zich daarbij op AR5/2013, waarin is opgenomen dat scenario’s waarbij de scherpe reductie wordt uitgesteld naar de periode tussen 2030 en 2050, leiden tot een grotere afhankelijkheid van technieken die tot CO2-reductie leiden. Volgens ditzelfde rapport zijn deze technieken echter nog niet zo ver ontwikkeld dat zij een substantiële bijdrage aan de reductie kunnen leveren (zie 2.19). Urgenda stelt in dit verband ten slotte dat het voor de EU nog altijd mogelijk is om, wanneer de voorwaarde daartoe zou intreden, alsnog aan de reductiedoelstelling van 30% te voldoen.

4.33.  De Staat stelt dat in 2020 voor Nederland, als afgeleide van de 20%-reductienorm van de EU, een totale reductie van ongeveer 17% zal worden bereikt. Voor het jaar 2030 committeert Nederland zich aan een reductie van 40% voor de EU als geheel. Voor 2050 gaat de Staat uit van een reductiepercentage van 80–95% voor de gehele EU. De rechtbank constateert dat nog niet vaststaat welke reductiepercentages als afgeleide van de Europese percentages voor Nederland zullen gaan gelden. De Staat acht de hier vermelde mijlpalen toereikend ter waarborging van de tweegradendoelstelling.

4.34.  Het geschil tussen partijen betreft niet het einddoel in 2050 en evenmin de noodzakelijke tussenstand in 2030. De Staat onderschrijft de stelling van Urgenda dat in 2050 de CO2-emissies met 80–95% moeten zijn teruggebracht ten opzichte van 1990. Het debat spitst zich toe op de vraag of — zoals Urgenda betoogt — de Staat tekortschiet in zijn zorgplicht door voor het jaar 2020 een lagere reductiedoelstelling te hanteren dan de in de klimaatwetenschap en het internationale klimaatbeleid aanvaarde norm van 25–40% ten opzichte van 1990. De Staat betoogt in de eerste plaats dat hij jegens Urgenda rechtens niet gehouden kan worden aan de norm van 25–40%. In de tweede plaats betwist de Staat dat hij met de door hem voorgestane lagere reductienorm voor 2020 zijn zorgplicht schendt. In de hiernavolgende paragraaf zal worden onderzocht of — en zo ja, in hoeverre — op de Staat jegens Urgenda een verplichting rust om voor Nederland een hogere reductienorm aan te houden dan thans het geval is.

D.  Rechtsplicht voor de Staat?

Inleiding

4.35.  Zoals hiervoor kort is aangestipt, maakt Urgenda de Staat verschillende verwijten. Zo stelt zij dat de Staat onrechtmatig handelt door in strijd met zijn grondwettelijke verplichting (artikel 21 Gw), zoals ingevuld in internationale, naar de stand van de wetenschap gemaakte afspraken, onvoldoende te mitigeren. Daarmee schaadt de Staat de door haar nagestreefde belangen, te weten: te voorkomen dat Nederland vanaf zijn grondgebied (meer dan evenredige) schade toebrengt aan huidige en toekomstige generaties in Nederland en daarbuiten. Daarnaast stelt Urgenda dat op de Staat op grond van de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM een positieve verplichting rust tot het treffen van beschermende maatregelen. Ook stelt Urgenda dat de Staat onrechtmatig handelt doordat als gevolg van het onvoldoende mitigeren hij (meer dan evenredig) het leefklimaat (en daardoor de gezondheid) van mens en milieu in gevaar brengt en daarmee de op hem rustende zorgplicht schendt. Volgens Urgenda handelt de Staat daarmee tegenover haar onrechtmatig in de zin van artikel 6:162 BW, al dan niet in combinatie met artikel 5:37 BW. De Staat bestrijdt dat uit deze artikelen een rechtsplicht voortvloeit tot een verdere beperking van de emissie dan hij thans verwezenlijkt. De rechtbank overweegt als volgt.

Strijd met een wettelijke plicht

Artikel 21 Gw en internationale verdragen

4.36.  Artikel 21 Gw legt een zorgplicht op aan de Staat voor de bewoonbaarheid van het land en de bescherming en verbetering van het leefmilieu. Deze zorg betreft voor het dichtbevolkte en laaggelegen Nederland als belangrijke onderwerpen de waterkering, de waterbeheersing en het leefmilieu. Deze regel en de geschiedenis daarvan geven geen uitsluitsel over de wijze waarop deze taak moet worden uitgevoerd en evenmin over de uitkomst van de afweging in geval van tegenstrijdige bepalingen. De wijze waarop deze taak moet worden vervuld behoort tot de eigen, discretionaire bevoegdheden van de regering.

4.37.  Uit het besef dat klimaatverandering een extraterritoriaal, wereldwijd probleem is en de bestrijding daarvan om een mondiale aanpak vraagt, hebben staatshoofden en regeringsleiders een bijdrage geleverd aan de ontwikkeling van een juridisch instrumentarium met het doel om klimaatverandering door mitigatie van broeikasgasuitstoot tegen te gaan en om hun landen “klimaatbestendig” te maken door het treffen van schadebeperkende maatregelen. Dit instrumentarium heeft zich ontwikkeld in internationaal verband (binnen de VN), Europees verband (binnen de EU) en nationaal verband. Het Nederlandse klimaatbeleid berust in belangrijke mate op dit instrumentarium.

4.38.  Nederland heeft zich verbonden aan het VN Klimaatverdrag. Dit is een raamverdrag waarin algemene beginselen en uitgangspunten zijn opgenomen, die de basis vormen voor het ontwikkelen van nadere, meer specifieke regels, bijvoorbeeld in de vorm van een protocol. Het Kyoto Protocol is daarvan een voorbeeld. Voor de nadere ontwikkeling en implementatie van een klimaatregime is de COP met een aantal subsidiaire organen opgericht. De besluiten van de COP zijn, op een enkele uitzondering na, niet juridisch bindend, maar kunnen wel de verplichtingen van de partijen bij het verdrag of protocol direct raken. Dat geldt bijvoorbeeld voor een aantal besluiten die onder het Kyoto Protocol zijn genomen. Het gaat om mechanismen die de handel in emissie(reductie)rechten mogelijk maken en die samenwerking tussen partijen toestaan zodat de uitstoot van broeikasgassen daar teruggedrongen kan worden waar dit het goedkoopst is.

4.39.  Urgenda heeft in dit verband ook nog gewezen op het volkenrechtelijke “no harm”-beginsel, dat inhoudt dat geen enkele staat het recht heeft zijn grondgebied zodanig te gebruiken of te laten gebruiken dat er significante schade wordt toegebracht aan andere staten. De Staat heeft de gelding van dit beginsel als zodanig niet bestreden.

4.40.  De zorg voor en de bescherming van het leefmilieu worden voorts in toenemende mate door de EU bepaald. De grondslag voor het Europees milieubeleid ligt besloten in artikel 191 VWEU. Voor de ontwikkeling en uitvoering van het communautair milieubeleid is merendeels gebruikgemaakt van richtlijnen. Dit betreft vaak minimumharmonisatie, zodat enerzijds een basisbeschermingsniveau binnen de gehele Unie gaat gelden, terwijl het lidstaten anderzijds niet de bevoegdheid ontneemt om voor hun eigen grondgebied strengere normen vast te stellen.

4.41.  Met het oog op de verplichting voor lidstaten om reductiemaatregelen te treffen is in deze zaak relevant de ETS Richtlijn, die is geïmplementeerd in hoofdstuk 16 van de Wet milieubeheer (zie 2.70). De Richtlijn introduceert een handelssysteem in emissierechten. De Europese Commissie bepaalt per periode van vijf jaren het plafond aan CO2-emissies. De toegestane uitstoot wordt in de vorm van emissierechten aan de lidstaat toegewezen. In EU-verband is verder relevant de Effort Sharing Decision (zie 2.62). Nederland heeft zich op grond van deze regelingen verbonden tot een reductie van 21% in 2020 ten opzichte van 2005 van de emissies die onder de ETS vallen en tot een reductie van 16% in 2020 ten opzichte van 2005 voor de niet-ETS-sectoren (zie 2.74).

4.42.  De Staat is in volkenrechtelijk opzicht gebonden aan het VN Klimaatverdrag, het Kyoto Protocol (met het bijbehorende Doha Amendement zodra dit gelding krijgt) en het “no harm”-beginsel. De volkenrechtelijke gebondenheid van de Staat brengt echter uitsluitend verplichtingen mee jegens andere staten. Wanneer de Staat een op hem rustende verplichting jegens een of meer andere staten verzaakt, impliceert dat nog niet dat de Staat onrechtmatig jegens Urgenda handelt. Dat ligt anders wanneer de betrokken geschreven of ongeschreven regel van volkenrecht een voorschrift betreft dat “een ieder verbindt”. Artikel 93 Gw bepaalt immers dat burgers aan deze internationale bepalingen een recht kunnen ontlenen wanneer deze naar haar inhoud een ieder kunnen verbinden. De rechtbank stelt — met de partijen — voorop dat de in het verdrag en het protocol opgenomen bepalingen en het “no harm”beginsel geen verbindende kracht jegens burgers (private personen en rechtspersonen) hebben. Urgenda kan zich dus niet rechtstreeks op dit beginsel, het verdrag en het protocol beroepen (zie onder meer HR 6 februari 2004, ECLI:NL:HR:2004:AN8071, NJ 2004, 329, Vrede c.s./Staat).

4.43.  Dit laat onverlet dat een staat wordt vermoed zijn volkenrechtelijke verplichtingen te willen nakomen. Daaruit volgt het beginsel dat een norm van nationaal recht — een wettelijk voorschrift of een ongeschreven rechtsnorm — niet mag worden uitgelegd of toegepast op een wijze waardoor de staat in kwestie een volkenrechtelijke verplichting schendt, tenzij geen andere interpretatie of toepassing mogelijk is. In de rechtspraak wordt deze regel algemeen erkend. Dit heeft tot gevolg dat de rechter bij de toepassing en invulling van nationaalrechtelijke open normen en begrippen, zoals de maatschappelijke betamelijkheid, de redelijkheid en billijkheid, het algemeen belang of bepaalde rechtsbeginselen, rekening houdt met dergelijke volkenrechtelijke verplichtingen. Zo krijgen deze verplichtingen een “reflexwerking” in het nationale recht.

4.44.  Wat hier is opgemerkt ten aanzien van volkenrechtelijke verplichtingen geldt in grote lijnen ook voor het Europese recht, zoals de VWEU-bepalingen waarop burgers zich niet rechtstreeks kunnen beroepen. Nederland is verplicht zijn nationale wetgeving aan te passen aan de in richtlijnen neergelegde doelen en is ook gebonden aan (mede) tot hem als lidstaat gerichte beschikkingen, en Urgenda kan aan dergelijke rechtsregels geen rechtsplicht van de Staat jegens haar ontlenen. Maar ook dit gegeven staat er niet aan in de weg — zoals in het Gemeenschapsrecht ook is aanvaard — dat bepalingen in een EUverdrag of richtlijn kunnen doorwerken via de hier beschreven open normen van het nationale recht.

Strijd met een subjectief recht

De artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM

4.45.  Bij de beoordeling van de vraag of de Staat met zijn huidige klimaatbeleid inbreuk maakt op een subjectief recht van Urgenda overweegt de rechtbank dat Urgenda zelf niet kan worden aangemerkt als een direct of indirect slachtoffer, in de zin van artikel 34 EVRM, van een schending van de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM. Bij een rechtspersoon kan zich immers, anders dan bij een natuurlijke persoon, geen aantasting van zijn fysieke integriteit voordoen of een inmenging in zijn privéleven (vgl. EHRM 12 mei 2015, Identoba e.a./Georgië, nr. 73235/12). Ook als de statutaire doelstellingen van Urgenda zo worden uitgelegd dat zij mede omvatten de bescherming van de (inter)nationale samenleving tegen een schending van artikel 2 of 8 EVRM, levert dit Urgenda geen status van potentieel slachtoffer in de zin van artikel 34 EVRM op (vgl. EHRM 29 september 2009, Van Melle e.a./Nederland, nr. 19221/08). Aan Urgenda zelf komt dan ook geen rechtstreeks beroep toe op de artikelen 2 of 8 EVRM.

4.46.  Deze beide artikelen en de daaraan door het EHRM gegeven interpretatie, in het bijzonder in milieurechtelijke kwesties, kunnen op de eerder beschreven wijze wel als inspiratiebron dienen bij de invulling en concretisering van open privaatrechtelijke normen, zoals de ongeschreven zorgvuldigheidsnorm van 6:162 BW. Daarom staat de rechtbank thans — kort — stil bij de milieurechtelijke beginselen en het beschermingsbereik van de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM, zoals die uit de rechtspraak van het EHRM zijn af te leiden.

4.47.  Op aanbeveling van de Parlementaire Assemblee en in opdracht (en onder verantwoordelijkheid) van het Comité van Ministers van de Raad van Europa is, voor het eerst in 2005, een “Manual on human rights and the environment” uitgebracht. Het doel van deze gids is om bij een breed publiek het begrip van de relatie tussen de bescherming van mensenrechten op grond van het EVRM en het milieu te vergroten en om daarmee bij te dragen aan het versterken van milieurechtelijke bescherming op nationaal niveau. Met dit doel voor ogen verschaft de gids (onder andere) informatie over de rechtspraak van het EHRM op dit gebied, en besteedt het ook aandacht aan de impact van het Europees Sociaal Handvest en de relevante uitleg van dit Handvest door het Europees Comité voor Sociale Rechten. De laatste versie van de gids dateert van 2012. Voor zover in het navolgende een uitleg wordt gegeven aan de EHRM-rechtspraak, onderschrijft de rechtbank die.

4.48.  In deel II van de gids zijn de aan de rechtspraak van het EHRM te ontlenen milieurechtelijke beginselen beschreven. De rechtbank acht uit dit deel de volgende passages relevant:

“(…) the Court has emphasised that the effective enjoyment of the rights which are encompassed in the Convention depends notably on a sound, quiet and healthy environment conducive to well-being. The subject-matter of the cases examined by the Court shows that a range of environmental factors may have an impact on individual convention rights, such as noise levels from airports, industrial pollution, or town planning.

As environmental concerns have become more important nationally and internationally since 1950, the case-law of the Court has increasingly reflected the idea that human rights law and environmental law are mutually reinforcing. Notably, the Court is not bound by its previous decisions, and in carrying out its task of interpreting the Convention, the Court adopts an evolutive approach. Therefore, the interpretation of the rights and freedoms is not fixed but can take account of the social context and changes in society. As a consequence, even though no explicit right to a clean and quiet environment is included in the Convention or its protocols, the case-law of the Court has shown a growing awareness of a link between the protection of the rights and freedoms of individuals and the environment. The Court has also made reference, in its case law, to other international environmental law standards and principles. (…)

However, it is not primarily upon the European Court of Human Rights to determine which measures are necessary to protect the environment, but upon national authorities. The Court has recognised that national authorities are best placed to make decisions on environmental issues, which often have difficult social and technical aspects. Therefore, in reaching its judgments, the Court affords the national authorities in principle a wide discretion — in the language of the Court a wide “margin of appreciation” — in their decisionmaking in this sphere. This is the practical implementation of the principle of subsidiarity, which has been stressed in the Interlaken Declaration of the High Level Conference on the Future of the European Court of Human Rights. According to this principle, violations of the Convention should be prevented or remedied at the national level with the Court intervening only as a last resort. The principle is particularly important in the context of environmental matters due to their very nature.”

4.49.  Vervolgens is in aparte hoofdstukken de reikwijdte van de bescherming op grond van diverse artikelen van het EVRM in milieukwesties nader uitgewerkt. De rechtbank acht in de context van deze zaak uit het eerste hoofdstuk van deel II (“Chapter I: the right to life and environment”) de volgende beginselen, met inbegrip van de daarop volgende uitleg, relevant (waarbij de voetnoten naar de desbetreffende arresten van het EHRM niet in het citaat zijn overgenomen):

  1. (a)  The right to life is protected under Article 2 of the Convention.

    This Article does not solely concern deaths resulting directly from the actions of the agents of a State, but also lays down a positive obligation on States to take appropriate steps to safeguard the lives of those within their jurisdiction. This means that public authorities have a duty to take steps to guarantee the rights of the Convention even when they are threatened by other (private) persons or activities that are not directly connected with the State.

    1. 1.  (…) in some situations Article 2 may also impose on public authorities a duty to take steps to guarantee the right to life when it is threatened by persons or activities not directly connected with the State. (…) In the context of the environment, Article 2 has been applied where certain activities endangering the environment are so dangerous that they also endanger human life.

    2. 2.  It is not possible to give an exhaustive list of examples of situations in which this obligation might arise. It must be stressed however that cases in which issues under Article 2 have arisen are exceptional. So far, the Court has considered environmental issues in four cases brought under Article 2, two of which relate to dangerous activities and two which relate to natural disasters. In theory, Article 2 can apply even though loss of life has not occurred, for example in situations where potentially lethal force is used inappropriately.

  2. ( b)  The Court has found that the positive obligation on States may apply in the context of dangerous activities, such as nuclear tests, the operation of chemical factories with toxic emissions or waste-collection sites, whether carried out by public authorities themselves or by private companies. In general, the extent of the obligations of public authorities depends on factors such as the harmfulness of the dangerous activities and the foreseeability of the risks to life.

  3. ( c)  (…)

  4. ( d)  In the first place, public authorities may be required to take measures to prevent infringements of the right to life as a result of dangerous activities or natural disasters. This entails, above all, the primary duty of a State to put in a place a legislative and administrative framework which includes: (…)”

4.50.  Uit Chapter II (“respect for private and family life as well as the home and the environment”) zijn de volgende beginselen (met uitleg) van belang:

  1. (a)  (…)

  2. ( b)  Environmental degradation does not necessarily involve a violation of Article 8 as it does not include an express right to environmental protection or nature conservation.

  3. (c )  For an issue to arise under Article 8, the environmental factors must directly and seriously affect private and family life or the home. Thus, there are two issues which the Court must consider — whether a causual link exists between the activity and the negative impact on the individual and whether the adverse have attained a certain threshold of harm. The assessment of that minimum threshold depends on all the circumstances of the case, such as the intensity and duration of the nuisance and its physical or mental effects, as well as on the general environmental context.

    (…)

    1. 15.  In the Kyrtatos v. Greece case, the applicants brought a complaint under Article 8 alleging that urban development had led to the destruction of a swamp adjacent to their property, and that the area around their home had lost its scenic beauty. The Court emphasised that domestic legislation and certain other international instruments rather than the Convention are more appropriate to deal with the general protection of the environment. The purpose of the Convention is to protect individual human rights, such as the right to respect for the home, rather than the general aspirations or needs of the community taken as a whole. The Court highlighted in this case that neither Article 8 nor any of the other articles of the Convention are specifically designed to provide general protection of the environment as such. In this case, the Court found no violation of Article 8.

  4. ( d)  While the objective of Article 8 is essentially that of protecting the individual against arbitrary interference by public authorities, it may also imply in some cases an obligation on public authorities to adopt positive measures designed to secure the rights enshrined in this article. This obligation does not only apply in cases where environmental harm is directly caused by State activities but also when it results from private sector activities. Public authorities must make sure that such measures are implemented so as to guarantee rights protected under Article 8. The Court has furthermore explicitly recognised that public authorities may have a duty to inform the public about environmental risks. Moreover, the Court has stated with regard to the scope of the positive obligation that it is generally irrelevant of whether a situation is assessed from the perspective of paragraph 1 of Article 8 which, inter alia, relates to the positive obligations of State authorities, or paragraph 2 asking whether a State interference was justified, as the principles applied are almost identical.

    (…)”

Artikel 5:37 BW

4.51.  Voor zover Urgenda een beroep heeft gedaan op artikel 5:37 BW (hinder) is de rechtbank van oordeel dat dit artikel, naast hetgeen hierna met betrekking tot de zorgplicht zal worden opgemerkt, geen zelfstandige betekenis heeft.

Tussenconclusie ten aanzien van de rechtsplicht

4.52.  Het voorgaande voert de rechtbank tot de slotsom dat uit artikel 21 Gw, het “no harm”-beginsel, het VN Klimaatverdrag met bijbehorende protocollen en artikel 191 VWEU met de daarop gebaseerde ETS-richtlijn en Effort Sharing Decision niet een rechtsplicht van de Staat jegens Urgenda kan worden afgeleid. Hoewel Urgenda aan deze regels, en ook aan de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM, niet rechtstreeks rechten kan ontlenen, komt aan deze regelgeving niettemin betekenis toe, namelijk bij de hierna te bespreken vraag of de Staat jegens Urgenda zijn zorgplicht schendt. In de eerste plaats kan uit deze regels worden afgeleid welke mate van beleidsvrijheid de Staat toekomt bij de wijze waarop hij de hem gegeven taken en bevoegdheden uitoefent en in de tweede plaats zijn de hierin vastgelegde doelstellingen van betekenis voor het bepalen van de mate van zorg die de Staat ten minste in acht moet nemen. Voor de bepaling van de omvang van de zorgplicht van de Staat en de hem toekomende beleidsvrijheid zal de rechtbank hierna dus ook de doelstellingen van het internationale en Europese klimaatbeleid alsmede de daaraan ten grondslag gelegde beginselen in ogenschouw nemen.

Strijd met de maatschappelijke zorgvuldigheid, beleidsvrijheid

4.53.  De vraag of de Staat zijn zorgplicht schendt doordat hij onvoldoende maatregelen treft om gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen, is een rechtsvraag die niet eerder in een Nederlandse procedure is beantwoord en waarvoor de jurisprudentie ook geen op maat gesneden kader biedt. Het antwoord op de vraag of de Staat voldoende mitigeert hangt af van vele factoren. Twee aspecten zijn daarbij vooral relevant. In de eerste plaats moet worden beoordeeld of sprake is van onrechtmatige gevaarzetting door de Staat. In de tweede plaats komt bij de beoordeling van het overheidshandelen betekenis toe aan de beleidsvrijheid van de Staat. Uit de rechtspraak inzake overheidsaansprakelijkheid volgt dat de rechter ten volle moet beoordelen of de Staat voldoende zorg (heeft) betracht, maar dat dit niet wegneemt dat de Staat zelf mag uitmaken hoe hij zijn zorgplicht ten uitvoer brengt. De aan de Staat toegekende discretionaire ruimte is echter niet onbegrensd: de zorg van de Staat mag niet onder de maat zijn. Geheel te onderscheiden zijn de hier vereiste zorgvuldigheidstoets en de beleidsvrijheid van de overheid overigens niet. Bij de invulling van de zorgplicht zal immers ook de specifieke positie van de aangesproken persoon, gelet op de bijzondere aard van zijn taak of bevoegdheid, zijn verwerkt. De zorgvuldigheidsnorm is daarop afgestemd.

Factoren ter bepaling van de zorgplicht

4.54.  Urgenda heeft zich voor de invulling van de eis van maatschappelijk zorgvuldig handelen beroepen op het in het zogeheten Kelderluikarrest (HR 5 november 1965, ECLI:NL:HR:1965:AB7079, NJ 1966, 136) en latere jurisprudentie ontwikkelde leerstuk van gevaarzetting. De Staat heeft begrijpelijkerwijs gewezen op relevante verschillen tussen deze jurisprudentie en deze zaak. Deze zaak onderscheidt zich daarvan doordat centraal staat de omgang met een gevaarlijke ontwikkeling op wereldschaal waarvan onzeker is wanneer, waar en in welke exacte omvang het gevaar zich zal verwezenlijken. Niettemin vertoont het leerstuk van de gevaarzetting, zoals in de literatuur wordt uiteengezet, verwantschap met het thema van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering en kunnen aan de gevaarzettingsjurisprudentie voor de invulling van het maatschappelijk onzorgvuldig handelen in de onderhavige zaak een aantal (hierna te noemen) criteria worden ontleend.24

4.55.  De mate waarin aan de Staat beleidsruimte toekomt, wordt in beginsel bepaald door zijn wettelijke taak en bevoegdheden die aan de Staat zijn gegeven. Zoals hiervoor is uiteengezet, komt aan de Staat op grond van artikel 21 Gw een ruime bevoegdheid toe om het nationale klimaatbeleid in te richten op de wijze die hij geraden acht. De rechtbank is echter van oordeel dat door de aard van het gevaar (een wereldwijde veroorzaking) en de in dat verband te verwezenlijken taak (deelrisicobeheer van een mondiaal gevaar dat tot aantasting van het leefklimaat in Nederland kan leiden) voor de bepaling van de beleidsruimte en de zorgplicht mede moet worden gelet op de doelstellingen en beginselen zoals neergelegd in het VN Klimaatverdrag en in het VWEU.

4.56.  De doelstellingen en beginselen van het internationale klimaatbeleid zijn geformuleerd in de artikelen 2 en 3 van het VN Klimaatverdrag (zie 2.37 en 2.38). Voor de beoordeling van de beleidsruimte en zorgplicht acht de rechtbank meer in het bijzonder de in artikel 3 opgenomen beginselen onder (i), (iii) en (iv) relevant. Deze luiden, kort samengevat:

  1. (i)  bescherming van het klimaatsysteem, ten behoeve van huidige en toekomstige generaties, op basis van billijkheid;

  2. (iii)  het voorzorgsbeginsel;

  3. (iv)  het duurzaamheidsbeginsel.

4.57.  Het billijkheidsbeginsel (i) houdt in dat het beleid tot uitgangspunt moet nemen niet alleen datgene wat op dit moment voor de huidige generatie het meest voordelig is, maar ook wat dat betekent voor toekomstige generaties, opdat niet zij uitsluitend of in onevenredige mate de gevolgen van klimaatverandering dragen. Het billijkheidsbeginsel brengt voorts tot uitdrukking dat ontwikkelde landen in de bestrijding van klimaatverandering en de nadelige gevolgen ervan het voortouw moeten nemen. De rechtvaardiging daarvan, zo wordt in de literatuur ook opgemerkt, ligt in de eerste plaats hierin dat de huidige ontwikkelde landen uit historisch perspectief de belangrijkste veroorzakers zijn van de huidige hoge broeikasgasconcentratie in de atmosfeer en dat zij daarvan, door het gebruik van fossiele brandstoffen, ook voordeel hebben gehad in de vorm van economische groei en welvaart. Hun welvaart brengt ook mee dat zij over de meeste middelen beschikken om maatregelen te nemen ter bestrijding van klimaatverandering.25

4.58.  Met het voorzorgsbeginsel (iii) brengt het VN Klimaatverdrag tot uitdrukking dat niet gewacht mag worden met het treffen van maatregelen totdat volledige wetenschappelijke zekerheid bestaat. Ondanks een bepaalde mate van wetenschappelijke onzekerheid dienen partijen te anticiperen op het voorkomen of inperken van de oorzaken van klimaatverandering of het voorkomen of inperken van de nadelige gevolgen daarvan. Bij de afweging die nodig is voor het treffen van maatregelen uit voorzorg, zonder dat volkomen duidelijk is of de acties een voldoende effect zullen sorteren, kan volgens het verdrag rekening worden gehouden met een kostenbatenverhouding: als de voorzorgsmaatregelen een mondiaal voordeel opleveren tegen zo laag mogelijke kosten, zullen zij eerder genomen moeten worden.

4.59.  In het duurzaamheidsbeginsel (iv) is tot uitdrukking gebracht dat de partijen bij het verdrag de duurzame ontwikkeling zullen bevorderen, alsmede dat economische ontwikkeling essentieel is voor het nemen van maatregelen om klimaatverandering tegen te gaan.

4.60.  De doelstellingen van het Europese milieubeleid zijn geformuleerd in artikel 191 lid 1 VWEU (zie 2.53). De voor deze zaak van belang zijnde beginselen (blijkens lid 2 van dit artikel) zijn de volgende:

  • —  het beginsel van een hoog beschermingsniveau;

  • —  het voorzorgsbeginsel;

  • —  het preventiebeginsel.

4.61.  Met het beginsel van een hoog beschermingsniveau drukt de EU uit dat het milieubeleid een hoge prioriteit heeft en, hoewel rekening is te houden met regionale verschillen, strikt moet worden doorgevoerd. Het voorzorgsbeginsel duidt erop dat ook in communautair verband niet gewacht moet worden met acties ter bescherming van het milieu totdat volledige wetenschappelijke zekerheid bestaat. Het preventiebeginsel betekent, kort gezegd: “voorkomen is beter dan genezen”; het is beter om het ontstaan van milieuproblemen (vervuiling, hinder, in deze zaak: klimaatverandering) te voorkomen dan om later de gevolgen ervan te bestrijden.

4.62.  Artikel 191 lid 3 VWEU houdt daarnaast in dat de EU bij het bepalen van haar beleid op milieugebied rekening houdt met:

  • —  de beschikbare wetenschappelijke en technische gegevens;

  • —  de milieuomstandigheden in de onderscheiden regio’s van de Unie;

  • —  de voordelen en lasten die kunnen voortvloeien uit optreden, onderscheidenlijk niet-optreden;

  • —  de economische en sociale ontwikkeling van de Unie als geheel en de evenwichtige ontwikkeling van haar regio’s.

4.63.  De hier genoemde doelstellingen en beginselen hebben, zoals overwogen, door hun internationale en publiekrechtelijke karakter geen directe werking. Zij bepalen echter wel in belangrijke mate het kader voor en de wijze van de bevoegdheidsuitoefening door de Staat. Deze doelstellingen en beginselen vormen dus een belangrijk gezichtspunt bij de beoordeling of de Staat jegens Urgenda al dan niet rechtmatig handelt. Met inachtneming van al het voorgaande hangt het antwoord op de vraag of de Staat voldoende zorg betracht met zijn huidige klimaatbeleid, hiervan af of — naar objectieve maatstaven gemeten — de door de Staat getroffen reductiemaatregelen aanvaardbaar zijn ter voorkoming van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering voor mens en milieu, gelet ook op de aan de Staat toekomende beleidsvrijheid. Aldus zal de rechtbank bij het bepalen van de omvang van de zorgplicht van de Staat rekening houden met:

  1. ( i)  de aard en omvang van de schade als gevolg van klimaatverandering;

  2. (ii)  de bekendheid en voorzienbaarheid van deze schade;

  3. (iii)  de kans dat gevaarlijke klimaatverandering zich zal verwezenlijken;

  4. (iv)  de aard van de gedraging (of het nalaten) van de Staat;

  5. ( v)  de bezwaarlijkheid van het treffen van voorzorgsmaatregelen;

  6. (vi)  de beleidsvrijheid die, met inachtneming van de publiekrechtelijke beginselen, aan de Staat toekomt bij de uitvoering van zijn publieke taak,

    een en ander mede gelet op:

    • —  de stand van de wetenschap;

    • —  de beschikbare (technische) mogelijkheid tot het nemen van veiligheidsmaatregelen, en

    • —  de kostenbatenverhouding van de te nemen veiligheidsmaatregelen.

De zorgplicht

(i–iii)  de aard en omvang van de schade als gevolg van klimaatverandering, de bekendheid en voorzienbaarheid van deze schade en de kans dat gevaarlijke klimaatverandering zich zal verwezenlijken

4.64.  Zoals hiervoor is uiteengezet, zijn de partijen het erover eens dat door de huidige klimaatverandering en de dreiging van verdere verandering met onomkeerbare en ernstige gevolgen voor mens en milieu, de Staat ten behoeve van zijn burgers voorzorgsmaatregelen moet treffen. Het gaat om de vraag naar de omvang van de reductiemaatregelen die de Staat per 2020 moet treffen.

4.65.  Nu vaststaat dat de huidige mondiale uitstoot en de reductiedoelstellingen van de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag onvoldoende zijn om de tweegradendoelstelling mogelijk te maken en de kans op gevaarlijke klimaatverandering daarmee zeer groot moet worden geacht — en dit met ernstige gevolgen voor mens en milieu, zowel in Nederland als daarbuiten — rust op de Staat de plicht om op zijn eigen grondgebied maatregelen te treffen om gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen. Nu ook vaststaat dat zonder verregaande reductiemaatregelen de mondiale broeikasgasuitstoot over een aantal jaren, omstreeks 2030, zodanig is dat de tweegradendoelstelling niet kan worden gehaald, geldt bovendien dat bij het treffen van mitigatiemaatregelen spoed moet worden betracht. Immers, hoe sneller de daling van de emissie kan worden ingezet, hoe groter de kans is dat het gevaar wijkt. In de woorden van Urgenda: het proberen af te remmen van klimaatverandering is als het afremmen van een olietanker die al tientallen kilometers uit de kust de motor moet afzetten om de kade niet te rammen. Indien men dat pas doet zodra de kade in zicht is, zal de kade niet lang daarna onvermijdelijk geramd worden. De rechtbank neemt mede in aanmerking dat de Staat reeds vanaf 1992, maar zeker vanaf 2007, bekend is met de opwarming van de aarde en de daaraan verbonden risico’s. Deze factoren leiden de rechtbank tot het oordeel dat, gegeven het hoge risico van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering, op de Staat een zware zorgplicht rust om maatregelen te treffen ter voorkoming daarvan.

(iv)  de aard van de gedraging (of het nalaten) van de overheid

4.66.  De Staat heeft betoogd dat hij niet zelf als medeveroorzaker van een dreigende klimaatverandering kan worden beschouwd, omdat hij geen broeikasgassen emitteert. Vast staat echter dat de Staat het in zijn macht heeft om controle uit te oefenen over het collectieve Nederlandse emissieniveau (en dat hij deze controle ook werkelijk uitoefent). Zijn handelen (of nalaten) staat derhalve in zodanig verband met de Nederlandse emissie, dat van hem met het oog op de veiligheidsbelangen van derden (burgers), waaronder Urgenda, een hoge mate van zorgvuldigheid moet worden gevergd. Overigens rust op de Staat op grond van artikel 21 Gw een zorgplicht voor de bescherming en verbetering van het leefmilieu. Bovendien heeft de Staat, door partij te worden bij het VN Klimaatverdrag en het Kyoto Protocol, uitdrukkelijk aanvaard dat hij verantwoordelijk is voor het nationale emissieniveau en heeft hij in dat kader de verplichting aanvaard dit emissieniveau te reduceren voor zoveel als nodig is om een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen. Daar komt bij dat voor de transitie naar een duurzame samenleving burgers en bedrijven voor het gebruik van niet-fossiele energiebronnen afhankelijk zijn van het aanbod daarvan en dat dit aanbod mede afhangt van de mogelijkheden die worden geboden om “groene energie” aan te bieden (vergelijk bijvoorbeeld het wetsvoorstel 34 058, Windenergie op zee, dat thans in behandeling is bij de Eerste Kamer). De Staat speelt dus een cruciale rol in de transitie naar een duurzame samenleving. Hem past daarom een hoge mate van zorg voor het treffen van een adequaat en effectief wettelijk en instrumenteel kader tot vermindering van de broeikasgasuitstoot in Nederland.

(v)  de bezwaarlijkheid om voorzorgsmaatregelen te treffen

4.67.  Voor het antwoord op de vraag of — en zo ja, in hoeverre — op de Staat een plicht rust tot het treffen van voorzorgsmaatregelen, is ook relevant of het nemen van voorzorgsmaatregelen bezwaarlijk is. Daarbij zijn verschillende aspecten te onderscheiden. Van belang is bijvoorbeeld of de te treffen maatregelen op zichzelf kostbaar zijn of niet. Daarnaast kan van belang zijn of de voorzorgsmaatregelen in relatie tot de mogelijke schade kostbaar zijn. Daarbij kan de doeltreffendheid van de maatregelen een rol spelen. Tot slot komt hierbij betekenis toe aan de beschikbaarheid van (technische) mogelijkheden tot het nemen van de vereiste maatregelen.

4.68.  Onderwerp van het debat van partijen is de vraag of de door de Staat voorgenomen reductiedoelstelling dan wel de door Urgenda gevorderde reductiedoelstelling het meest kosteneffectief is. Daarbij gaat het om de macro-economische kosten van een bepaald mitigatiebeleid. De IPCC-rapporten bevatten hieromtrent prognoses per scenario.

4.69.  Urgenda heeft betoogd dat het kosteneffectiever is om vast te houden aan de (strengere) reductiedoelstelling van 25–40% in 2020. De Staat heeft, met verwijzing naar Europese beleidsdocumenten, gesteld dat het ook kosteneffectief is wanneer wordt uitgegaan van een reductie van 40% in 2030 en 80% in 2050 (zie 2.64 en 2.66). De rechtbank overweegt als volgt.

4.70.  De rechtbank stelt hierbij voorop dat — zoals reeds is overwogen — de Staat in zijn buitenlandse beleid lange tijd is uitgegaan van een vereiste reductie in 2020, voor de Annex I-landen, van 25–40% beneden het niveau van 1990 en zich als gevolg daarvan heeft gecommitteerd aan het streven van de EU om een doelstelling van 30% reductie in 2020 te formuleren. Tot ongeveer 2010 heeft Nederland een nationale reductiedoelstelling voor 2020 van 30% (ten opzichte van 1990) gehad. Volgens het toenmalige kabinet was destijds, in 2009, voor het bereiken van de tweegradendoelstelling wetenschappelijk bezien een reductie van 25–40% in 2020 nodig om “op een geloofwaardig traject te blijven om [die] doelstelling binnen bereik te houden” (zie 2.73). Deze reductiedoelstelling werd toen kennelijk als kosteneffectief beschouwd. De Staat heeft niet betoogd dat het loslaten van deze nationale reductiedoelstelling van 30% en het in plaats daarvan volgen van de EU-doelstelling van 20% voor 2020 ten opzichte van 1990 (die volgens de huidige prognoses uitkomt op een reductie in Nederland van ongeveer 17%), zijn ingegeven door verbeterde wetenschappelijke inzichten of doordat het economisch niet verantwoord zou zijn om bij de doelstelling van 30% te blijven. De Staat heeft evenmin concrete gegevens verstrekt waaruit zou kunnen blijken dat de reductieroute van 25–40% in 2020 tot onevenredig hoge kosten zou leiden, of in vergelijking met de langzamere reductieroute om andere redenen niet kosteneffectief zou zijn. Integendeel: de Staat heeft op de zitting van 14 april 2015 bevestigd dat het ook nu voor Nederland nog mogelijk is om alsnog in 2020 aan de EU-doelstelling van 30% te voldoen, wanneer de voorwaarde daartoe binnenkort in vervulling zou gaan. Op grond hiervan concludeert de rechtbank dat er uit kostenoverwegingen geen belemmering van betekenis is om een strengere reductiedoelstelling aan te houden.

4.71.  De rechtbank neemt voorts in aanmerking dat binnen de klimaatwetenschap en het internationale klimaatbeleid consensus bestaat over het feit dat de meest ernstige gevolgen van klimaatverandering moeten worden voorkomen. Bekend is dat de risico’s en de schade van klimaatverandering toenemen naarmate de gemiddelde temperatuur stijgt. Dat onmiddellijk ingrijpen nú, zoals Urgenda betoogt, kosteneffectiever is, wordt dan ook ondersteund door het IPCC en het UNEP (zie 2.19 en 2.30). Uit de desbetreffende rapporten volgt bovendien dat mitigatie van de broeikasgasuitstoot op de korte en lange termijn de enige doeltreffende manier is om het gevaar van klimaatverandering af te wenden. Met adaptatiemaatregelen kunnen de gevolgen van klimaatverandering worden verminderd, maar het gevaar van klimaatverandering kan er niet mee worden afgewend. Mitigatie is daarvoor het enige werkelijk doeltreffende middel.

4.72.  Mitigatie kan, zo leidt de rechtbank uit de verschillende door partijen overgelegde rapporten af, op verschillende manieren worden bereikt. Te denken is aan beperking van het gebruik van fossiele brandstoffen onder meer door emissierechtenhandel of belastingmaatregelen, door de introductie van hernieuwde energiebronnen, door vermindering van het energiegebruik en door herbebossing en het tegengaan van ontbossing. De Staat heeft hierbij mede verwezen naar nieuwe technologieën zoals CO2-afvang en -opslag. Voor zover de Staat heeft willen betogen dat te verwachten valt dat in de toekomst door CO2-afvang en -opslag alsnog in hoog tempo tot CO2-reductie kan worden gekomen, acht de rechtbank dit standpunt onvoldoende toegelicht. Een dergelijke verwachting zou van belang zijn als vaststaat dat door het gebruik van deze technieken een zodanige reductie mogelijk wordt dat de extra uitstoot tussen nu en 2050, zoals weergegeven in de eerste van de bovengemelde grafieken, daardoor wordt gecompenseerd. Urgenda heeft, zonder voldoende tegenspraak van de Staat, betoogd dat voor zover dergelijke technieken al in voldoende mate beschikbaar zijn (de CO2-afvang en -opslag verkeren nog in de experimentele fase), het niet aannemelijk is dat technieken van deze aard op korte termijn en dus tijdig kunnen worden toegepast. Urgenda heeft hierbij mede verwezen naar de daarvoor vereiste nadere regelgeving. Tijdens de pleitzitting is aan de orde gesteld dat op diverse terreinen initiatieven worden genomen, zoals voor hernieuwde energie (het al genoemde wetsvoorstel 34 058 voor windenergie op zee) en voor CO2-afvang en -opslag, maar dat deze initiatieven zich nog in de beginfase bevinden, zonder concreet uitzicht op succes. In de rapporten van het UNEP en het IPCC waarnaar de partijen hebben verwezen, wordt dan ook beklemtoond dat later ingrijpen de noodzaak van nieuwe technologieën vergroot, terwijl de risico’s en mogelijkheden daarvan onzeker zijn.

4.73.  Op grond van het hier overwogene concludeert de rechtbank dat het, bij de huidige stand van de techniek en de wetenschap, ter voorkoming van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering het meest doeltreffend is om te mitigeren en dat het uit kosteneffectiviteit beter is om nu adequaat in te grijpen dan om maatregelen uit te stellen. Op de Staat rust naar het oordeel van de rechtbank dan ook een zorgplicht om zo snel en zo veel als mogelijk te mitigeren.

(vi)  de bij de uitvoering van zijn publieke taak aan de Staat — met inachtneming van de publiekrechtelijke beginselen — toekomende beleidsvrijheid

4.74.  Bij de beantwoording van de vraag of de Staat met zijn huidige klimaatbeleid voldoende zorg betracht, moet zoals gezegd ook de aan de Staat toekomende beleidsvrijheid in acht worden genomen. Vanuit zijn wettelijke taak — artikel 21 Gw — bezien heeft te gelden dat aan de Staat een ruime beleidsvrijheid toekomt om het klimaatbeleid invulling te geven. Deze discretionaire ruimte is echter niet onbegrensd. Indien, zoals hier het geval is, een grote kans bestaat op verwezenlijking van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering met ernstige en levensbedreigende gevolgen voor mens en milieu, rust op de Staat de verplichting om zijn burgers daartegen te beschermen door het treffen van passende en effectieve maatregelen. Voor deze benadering kan mede steun worden gevonden in de hiervoor bedoelde jurisprudentie van het EHRM. De vraag is uiteraard wat in de gegeven omstandigheden passend en effectief is. Uitgangspunt daarbij moet zijn dat de Staat in zijn besluitvorming de verschillende belangen zorgvuldig weegt. Urgenda stelt dat de Staat voldoet aan zijn zorgplicht door een reductiedoelstelling van 40%, 30% of ten minste 25% na te streven voor het jaar 2020. De Staat betwist dit en wijst daarbij onder meer op de voorgenomen adaptiemaatregelen.

4.75.  De rechtbank herhaalt dat het hierbij ook en vooral aankomt op mitigatiemaatregelen. Met adaptiemaatregelen kan de Staat zijn burgers maar tot beperkte hoogte bescherming bieden tegen de gevolgen van klimaatverandering. Wanneer de huidige broeikasgasuitstoot wordt voortgezet, zal de opwarming van de aarde zodanige vormen aannemen dat de kosten voor adaptatie disproportioneel hoog worden. Adaptatiemaatregelen zijn op termijn dus niet voldoende om burgers te beschermen tegen de hier bedoelde gevolgen. De enige effectieve remedie tegen gevaarlijke klimaatverandering is vermindering van de uitstoot van broeikasgassen. De rechtbank komt dan ook tot het oordeel dat uit het oogpunt van doeltreffendheid van de in aanmerking komende maatregelen de keuzevrijheid van de Staat minder ruim is: mitigatie is essentieel voor het voorkomen van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering.

4.76.  De keuzevrijheid van de Staat wordt in dit geval verder verkleind door de hiervoor reeds genoemde voor de Staat geldende publiekrechtelijke beginselen. Deze beginselen zijn immers ontwikkeld als gevolg van het bijzondere gevaar van klimaatverandering. Zij stellen dan ook grenzen aan de keuzevrijheid van de Staat. Dit geldt bijvoorbeeld voor de omstandigheid dat de Annex Ilanden, waaronder Nederland, juist met het oog op een billijke verdeling tussen ontwikkelde en ontwikkelingslanden het voortouw hebben genomen bij het treffen van mitigatiemaatregelen en zich daarom tot een meer dan evenredige bijdrage aan de reductie hebben verplicht. Door ditzelfde billijkheidsbeginsel zal de Staat bij de door hem te kiezen maatregelen in aanmerking moeten nemen dat de kosten op een redelijke manier worden verdeeld tussen de huidige en de toekomstige generaties. Wanneer het volgens de huidige inzichten per saldo goedkoper blijkt te zijn om nu op te treden, rust er uit het oogpunt van zorgvuldig optreden een zwaardere plicht op de Staat om ten behoeve van toekomstige generaties daarnaar te handelen. Ook kan de Staat het nemen van voorzorgsmaatregelen niet uitstellen op de enkele grond dat nog geen wetenschappelijke zekerheid bestaat over het precieze effect ervan. Een kostenbatenafweging is hier wel toegestaan. Tot slot zal de Staat zich moeten laten leiden door het beginsel dat voorkómen beter is dan genezen.

4.77.  Voor al deze beginselen geldt dat als de Staat daarvan zou willen afwijken, hij daarvoor een voldoende rechtvaardiging zal moeten stellen en bewijzen. Een rechtvaardigingsgrond zou gelegen kunnen zijn in de kosten. Van de Staat kan niet het onmogelijke worden gevergd en er mag op hem geen onevenredige hoge last worden gelegd. Maar zoals reeds is overwogen, is gesteld noch gebleken dat de Staat ten enen male over onvoldoende financiële middelen beschikt om tot hogere reductiemaatregelen te komen. Evenzo kan niet worden geconcludeerd dat uit macro-economisch opzicht een belemmering bestaat om te kiezen voor een hoger emissiereductieniveau voor 2020.

4.78.  De Staat heeft betoogd dat toewijzing van de vordering van Urgenda, die is gericht op een verhoogde reductie van de broeikasgasuitstoot in Nederland, op mondiaal niveau beschouwd niet doeltreffend is, omdat een dergelijke doelstelling zou leiden tot een zeer geringe, zo niet verwaarloosbare, vermindering van de wereldwijde broeikasgasuitstoot. Het al dan niet behalen van de tweegradendoelstelling komt immers vooral aan op de reductiedoelstelling van andere landen met een hoge emissie. Meer specifiek beroept de Staat zich op het gegeven dat het aandeel van Nederland in de wereldwijde uitstoot op dit moment slechts 0,5% bedraagt. Als zou worden voldaan aan de door Urgenda gevorderde reductiedoelstelling van 25–40%, leidt dit volgens de Staat tot een extra reductie van 23,75 à 49,32 Mt CO2-eq (tot 2020), en dat is slechts 0,04-0,09% van de wereldwijde emissie. Op basis van de gedachte dat extra reductie de wereldwijde uitstoot nauwelijks beïnvloedt betoogt de Staat dat Urgenda geen belang heeft bij toewijzing van extra reductie zoals gevorderd.

4.79.  Dit argument slaagt niet. Het staat vast dat de klimaatverandering een mondiaal probleem is en een mondiale verantwoordelijkheid vraagt. Uit het UNEP-rapport volgt dat op grond van de reductietoezeggingen in Cancun in 2030 een kloof zal ontstaan tussen de gewenste (met het oog op het behalen van de tweegradendoelstelling) CO2-uitstoot en de werkelijke uitstoot van 14–17 Gt CO2. Dit houdt in dat er wereldwijd meer reductiemaatregelen moeten worden getroffen. Het noopt alle landen, ook Nederland, tot het zoveel als mogelijk doorvoeren van reductiemaatregelen. Dat de omvang van de Nederlandse uitstoot in vergelijking met andere landen gering is, doet niet af aan de verplichting om met het oog op de door de Staat te betrachten zorg voorzorgsmaatregelen te treffen. Vast staat immers dat elke antropogene broeikasgasemissie, hoe gering ook, bijdraagt aan een verhoging van het CO2-niveau in de atmosfeer en dus aan een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering. De reductie van de emissie betreft daarmee zowel een gezamenlijke als een individuele verantwoordelijkheid van de partijen bij het VN Klimaatverdrag. Nu de emissiereductie van Nederland wordt bepaald door de Staat, kan hij zich niet van mogelijke aansprakelijkheid ontdoen met de stelling dat zijn bijdrage gering is, zoals mutatis mutandis ook is geoordeeld in het zogeheten Kalimijnenarrest (HR 23 september 1988, NJ 1989, 743). De daarin gegeven regels gelden, naar analogie, ook voor de verplichting tot het treffen van voorzorgsmaatregelen ter voorkoming van de verwezenlijking van een gevaar zoals in deze zaak aan de orde is. De rechtbank komt dan ook tot het oordeel dat de enkele omstandigheid dat de Nederlandse uitstoot een gering aandeel betreft in de wereldwijde uitstoot, niet van invloed is op de door de Staat te betrachten zorgvuldigheid jegens derden. Ook hier neemt de rechtbank in aanmerking dat Nederland, met de andere Annex I-landen, juist met het oog op een billijke verdeling het voortouw heeft genomen bij het treffen van mitigatiemaatregelen en zich in dat opzicht tot een meer dan evenredige bijdrage aan de reductie heeft verplicht. Daar komt nog bij dat buiten discussie is dat de Nederlandse emissies per capita tot de hoogste van de wereld behoren.

4.80.  De Staat heeft ten slotte betoogd dat een verhoging van het emissiereductieniveau in de ETS-sector niet is toegestaan. De Staat heeft daartoe verwezen naar het door de EU vastgestelde emissieplafond voor de ETS-sector, dat in 2020 in deze sector moet leiden tot een EU-brede emissiereductie van 21% ten opzichte van 2005. Gelet op dit plafond en de in het VWEU neergelegde uitgangpunten van EU-recht, is het volgens de Staat niet mogelijk om voor bedrijven die in Nederland gevestigd zijn en tot de ETS-sector behoren een strengere (of minder strenge) emissiedoelstelling op te leggen dan 21%. Voor zover de Staat hiermee stelt dat Nederland bij de verdeling van emissierechten (de emissieruimte) onder de bedrijven in de ETS-sector moet handelen in overeenstemming met de EU-regelgeving en het daarin vastgestelde plafond in acht moet nemen, is dit juist. De rechtbank volgt de Staat echter niet in dit betoog voor zover het inhoudt dat een lidstaat niet méér mag reduceren dan in het Europese beleid is vastgesteld. Zoals hiervoor reeds is vastgesteld, heeft de Staat tot ongeveer 2010 een hogere reductiedoelstelling, te weten 30%, bepaald. Urgenda heeft terecht aangevoerd dat het voor lidstaten mogelijk is om, in weerwil van het plafond, door eigen, nationale maatregelen de uitstoot van broeikasgassen van nationale bedrijven in de ETS-sector (direct of indirect) te beïnvloeden. Bij haar pleidooi heeft Urgenda enkele voorbeelden van de invoering van dergelijke maatregelen in andere lidstaten genoemd, zoals de vergroting van het aandeel van duurzame energie in het nationale elektriciteitsnetwerk van Denemarken en de invoering van de “carbon price floor tax” in het Verenigd Koninkrijk, waardoor de prijs van de uitstoot van CO2 wordt verhoogd. De Staat heeft naar aanleiding van het betoog van Urgenda in meer algemene zin erkend dat het juridisch en feitelijk mogelijk is om voor de ETS-sectoren nationaal een verdergaand beleid te ontwikkelen dan het Europese. Naar het oordeel van de rechtbank belet de hier besproken Europese regelgeving de Staat dus niet om een hogere reductie voor 2020 na te streven.

4.81.  De rechtbank volgt de Staat ook niet in zijn stelling dat bij beperking van de emissie in Nederland, andere Europese landen dit zullen compenseren, en dat daardoor de uitstoot van broeikasgassen in de EU als geheel niet zal dalen. Het verschijnsel waarop de Staat doelt en dat op diverse niveaus kan optreden (tussen landen, maar ook tussen provincies, regio’s of op wereldschaal) en verschillende oorzaken kan hebben, wordt ook wel aangeduid als het “waterbedeffect” of “koolstoflekkage”. In AR5/2013 zijn onderzoeksresultaten uit 2012 beschreven, die laten zien dat met een gemiddeld percentage van 12% koolstofverlies rekening moet worden gehouden. In het begeleidende document bij de in 2.66 genoemde mededeling van de Europese Commissie van 22 januari 2014 (“samenvatting van de effectbeoordeling”) staat dat er voor het optreden van koolstoflekkage “voorlopig nog geen aanwijzingen” zijn. Gelet daarop valt niet vol te houden dat een extra reductie-inspanning van de Staat zonder substantiële betekenis zal zijn.

4.82.  Voor zover de Staat het standpunt heeft dat door een hogere reductieroute het “level playing field” van Nederlandse bedrijven kleiner wordt, heeft hij dit standpunt niet adequaat toegelicht of gedocumenteerd. Dit had wel op zijn weg gelegen, temeer nu tussen partijen vaststaat dat een deel van de Nederland omringende landen al een strenger nationaal klimaatbeleid voert (het Verenigd Koninkrijk, Denemarken, Duitsland en Zweden) en aanwijzingen ontbreken dat in die landen daarmee een ongelijk “speelveld” voor bedrijven is ontstaan. Onduidelijk is bovendien op welke bedrijven de Staat precies het oog heeft: het klimaatbeleid kan voor de ene sector een negatief effect hebben, maar voor de andere sector een positief effect. Ook valt in mondiaal opzicht niet goed in te zien of — en zo ja, in hoeverre — een strenger klimaatbeleid in Nederland enig effect sorteert op de positie van bedrijven (waaronder multinationals) ten opzichte van hun (inter)nationaal opererende concurrenten. Het standpunt wordt aldus verworpen.

Conclusie ten aanzien van de zorgplicht en vaststelling van de reductiedoelstelling

4.83.  Door de ernst van de gevolgen van klimaatverandering en de grote kans dat — zonder mitigerende maatregelen — gevaarlijke klimaatverandering zal intreden, concludeert de rechtbank dat op de Staat een zorgplicht rust om mitigatiemaatregelen te treffen. De omstandigheid dat Nederland op dit moment voor een klein deel bijdraagt aan de huidige mondiale broeikasgasuitstoot, doet daaraan niet af. Nu het 450-scenario minimaal geboden is om een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen, dient Nederland zodanige reductiemaatregelen te treffen dat daarmee dit scenario kan worden gehandhaafd.

4.84.  Het staat vast dat de Staat met het huidige emissiereductiebeleid van ten hoogste 20% reductie in EU-verband (ongeveer 17% in Nederland), voor het jaar 2020 niet voldoet aan de norm die volgens de huidige stand van de wetenschap en het internationale klimaatbeleid voor de Annex I-landen nodig is om de tweegradendoelstelling te bereiken.

4.85.  Urgenda heeft met juistheid betoogd dat door uitstel van mitigatie zoals de Staat thans voorstaat (minder stringente reductie tussen nu en 2030 en sterke reductie vanaf 2030) een cumulatie-effect optreedt, waardoor er meer CO2 in de atmosfeer terechtkomt dan wanneer wordt uitgegaan van een gelijkmatige procentuele of lineaire daling van de emissie van nu af aan. Bij het halen van een hogere reductiedoelstelling (van 40, 30 of 25%) in 2020 is over een langere periode gezien de totale, gecumuleerde, uitstoot van broeikasgassen veel geringer dan bij de door de Staat gekozen doelstelling van minder dan 20%. De rechtbank is, met Urgenda, van oordeel dat de keuze voor dit reductiepad, hoewel ook strekkend tot verwezenlijking van de tweegradendoelstelling, in hogere mate bijdraagt aan het risico van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering en daarmee niet is te zien als een toereikend en aanvaardbaar alternatief voor de — wetenschappelijk verankerde en erkende — hogere reductieroute van 25–40% in 2020.

4.86.  Dit zou slechts anders zijn wanneer de reductiedoelstelling van 25–40% tot een zodanig onevenredig zware last voor Nederland (in economisch opzicht) of de Staat (wegens zijn beperkte financiële middelen) zou leiden dat van deze — ter voorkoming van groot potentieel gevaar — doelstelling moet worden afgeweken. Maar dat dit het geval is, heeft de Staat niet gesteld. Integendeel: ook de Staat betoogt dat een verhoging van de reductiedoelstelling tot de mogelijkheden behoort. Dit brengt de rechtbank ten aanzien van dit geschilpunt tot de slotsom dat de Staat, gegeven de hier toegelichte beperking van zijn beleidsvrijheid, in geval van een reductie onder het niveau van 25–40% tekortschiet in de door hem te betrachten zorg en dusdoende onrechtmatig handelt. Hoewel is vastgesteld dat de Staat zich in het verleden heeft verbonden aan een reductiedoelstelling van 30% en niet is komen vast te staan dat dit hogere reductieniveau niet haalbaar is, ziet de rechtbank onvoldoende grond om de Staat te verplichten tot een hoger niveau dan dat van de ondergrens van 25%. Een reductiedoelstelling van deze omvang is volgens de wetenschappelijke standaard ten minste geboden en voldoende effectief om, wat Nederland betreft, het risico van een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering af te wenden, maar de verplichting tot een hoger percentage stuit af op de beleidsvrijheid die de Staat, ook met inachtneming van de hier toegelichte beperking, in elk geval toekomt.

Toerekening

4.87.  Uit hetgeen hiervoor is overwogen met betrekking tot de aard van de gedraging (met inbegrip van het nalaten) van de overheid volgt reeds dat het teveel aan broeikasgasuitstoot in Nederland tussen nu en 2020 dat zonder nadere maatregelen optreedt, aan de Staat kan worden toegerekend. Het ligt immers in de macht van de Staat om zodanige regels uit te vaardigen of andere maatregelen, waaronder publieksvoorlichting, te treffen dat een transitie naar een duurzame samenleving wordt bevorderd en de broeikasgasuitstoot in Nederland afneemt.

Schade

4.88.  De Staat heeft betoogd dat voor toewijzing van enige vordering aan Urgenda, ook al vraagt zij om preventieve rechtsbescherming, ten minste is vereist dat er een mogelijkheid van schade is in de vorm van vermogensvermindering of het verlies van een voordeel. De Staat erkent dat het niet nodig is dat schade is geleden, maar volgens hem moet wel vaststaan dat de belangen van Urgenda in concreto dreigen te worden aangetast. Ook betoogt de Staat dat onvoldoende is dat de dreiging in abstracto bestaat of dat er een kans bestaat dat zich op enige plaats in de wereld, voor wie dan ook, een risico op nadeel verwezenlijkt. Urgenda stelt hiertegenover dat zij een voldoende concreet belang heeft.

4.89.  De rechtbank overweegt als volgt. Het staat vast dat mede door de Nederlandse broeikasgasuitstoot klimaatverandering optreedt. Vast staat ook dat in Nederland reeds nu de negatieve gevolgen daarvan worden ondervonden, zoals overvloedige neerslag, en dat daarom ook nu al adaptatiemaatregelen worden getroffen om Nederland “klimaatbestendig” te maken. Verder staat vast dat als de mondiale, mede door Nederland veroorzaakte, uitstoot niet scherp daalt, zich waarschijnlijk een gevaarlijke klimaatverandering zal voordoen. Naar het oordeel van de rechtbank is de mogelijkheid van schade voor degenen wier belangen Urgenda behartigt, onder wie de huidige en toekomstige generatie Nederlanders, zodanig groot en concreet dat de Staat, gegeven de op hem rustende zorgplicht, een adequate bijdrage, groter dan de huidige, moet leveren om gevaarlijke klimaatverandering te voorkomen.

Causaal verband

4.90.  Uit hetgeen hiervoor, in het bijzonder in 4.79, is overwogen volgt reeds dat een voldoende causaal verband kan worden aangenomen tussen de Nederlandse broeikasgasuitstoot, de mondiale klimaatverandering en de effecten daarvan (nu en in de toekomst) op het Nederlandse leefklimaat. Dat de Nederlandse broeikasgasuitstoot op dit moment op wereldniveau bezien gering is, doet er niet aan af dat deze uitstoot mede de klimaatverandering veroorzaakt. Ook in dit opzicht neemt de rechtbank in aanmerking dat de Nederlandse broeikasgasuitstoot aan de klimaatverandering heeft bijgedragen en naar zijn aard ook zal bijdragen.

Relativiteit

4.91.  De zorg van de overheid voor een veilig leefklimaat strekt zich ten minste uit over het Nederlandse grondgebied. Nu Urgenda zich mede de belangen aantrekt van personen die nu en in de toekomst op dit grondgebied wonen, komt de rechtbank tot het oordeel dat de geschonden veiligheidsnorm — het betrachten van voldoende zorg bij de bestrijding van gevaarlijke klimaatverandering — zich mede uitstrekt tot het tegengaan van de mogelijke schade die Urgenda daarvan aldus ondervindt. Daarmee is aan het zogenoemde relativiteitsvereiste voldaan.

4.92.  In het midden kan blijven of Urgenda met haar hier besproken reductievordering ook succes kan hebben voor zover zij opkomt voor de rechten en belangen van huidige en toekomstige generaties uit andere landen. Voor toewijzing van de door haar gevorderde voorziening is immers niet nodig dat zij ook die ruime “achterban” dient. Onrechtmatigheid van de Staat jegens de huidige of toekomstige bevolking van Nederland is immers voldoende.

Conclusie ten aanzien van de rechtsplicht voor de Staat

4.93.  Op grond van het voorgaande concludeert de rechtbank dat de Staat — afgezien van het hierna nog te bespreken verweer — tegenover Urgenda onzorgvuldig en daarmee onrechtmatig heeft gehandeld door voor het jaar 2020 uit te gaan van een reductiedoelstelling van minder dan 25% ten opzichte van het jaar 1990.

E.  Het stelsel van machtenscheiding

4.94.  Bij dit hoofdpunt van het geschil gaat het om de vraag of toewijzing van de belangrijkste vordering van Urgenda — de vordering tot het geven van een bevel aan de Staat om de uitstoot van broeikasgassen verder te beperken dan volgens de huidige voornemens gebeurt — de verdeling van bevoegdheden binnen ons democratische stelsel zou doorkruisen. Urgenda beantwoordt deze vraag negatief, de Staat komt, met een beroep op de trias politica, tot het tegenovergestelde standpunt.

4.95.  De rechtbank stelt hierbij voorop dat het Nederlandse recht geen volledige scheiding van de staatsmachten, in dit geval tussen de uitvoerende macht en de rechtsprekende macht, kent. De verdeling van bevoegdheden over deze organen (en de wetgevende macht) strekt veeleer tot het bereiken van een evenwicht tussen deze staatsmachten. Daarbij heeft niet de ene macht in algemene zin en in alle gevallen het primaat boven de andere. Wel heeft elke staatsmacht haar eigen opdracht en verantwoordelijkheden. De rechter biedt rechtsbescherming en beslecht rechtsgeschillen. Hij moet dit ook doen als het van hem wordt gevraagd. Het is een wezenlijk kenmerk van de rechtsstaat dat ook het handelen van (zelfstandig democratisch gelegitimeerde en gecontroleerde) politieke organen, zoals de regering en de volksvertegenwoordiging, kan — en soms zelfs moet — worden beoordeeld door de van deze organen onafhankelijke rechter. Dit betreft dan een rechtmatigheidsoordeel. De rechter treedt daarbij niet in het politieke domein, met de daarbij behorende afwegingen en keuzen. Hij moet zich, los van iedere politieke agenda, beperken tot zijn domein, de toepassing van het recht. Afhankelijk van de kwesties en vorderingen die hem worden voorgelegd, zal zijn toets meer of minder terughoudend zijn. Grote terughoudendheid of zelfs abstinentie is vereist als het gaat om beleidsmatige afwegingen van uiteenlopende belangen die de inrichting of de ordening van de samenleving betreffen. De rechter moet zich ervan bewust zijn dat hij slechts een rol speelt in een rechtsgeschil tussen twee of meer partijen. Overheden, zoals de Staat (met organen zoals de regering en de Staten-Generaal), moeten daarentegen een algemene afweging maken, met inachtneming van mogelijk veel meer posities en belangen.

4.96.  Uit dit kenmerkende verschil tussen deze staatsmachten volgt nog niet rechtstreeks een antwoord op de vraag hoe de rechter behoort te beslissen als hij bevindt dat toewijzing van een vordering in een geschil tussen twee partijen aanzienlijke gevolgen heeft voor derden, die buiten de procedure staan. Een beslissing tussen twee private partijen heeft op zichzelf geen gevolgen voor de positie van derden, zodat de positie van derden dan in beginsel buiten beschouwing kan blijven. Een vordering die strekt tot een bevel zoals hier aan de orde is, in een zaak tegen de centrale overheid, kan echter wel degelijk directe of indirecte gevolgen hebben voor derden. Dit noopt de rechter tot terughoudendheid bij het toewijzen van dergelijke vorderingen, en dit temeer als hij de omvang en de betekenis van die gevolgen niet goed kan overzien.

4.97.  Overigens verdient opmerking dat de rechter, hoewel hij niet is gekozen en in zoverre dus niet democratisch is gelegitimeerd, in een ander — maar wezenlijk — opzicht wel degelijk een democratische legitimatie heeft. Zijn bevoegdheden en de daaruit voortvloeiende “macht” berusten immers op democratisch tot stand gekomen wetgeving, van nationale of internationale herkomst, waarin hem de opdracht is gegeven tot het beslechten van rechtsgeschillen. Deze opdracht geldt ook voor zaken waarin burgers, individueel of collectief, zich tegen overheden keren. De taak om rechtsbescherming te bieden tegen overheden, zoals de Staat, behoort bij uitstek tot het domein van de rechter. Ook deze taak is in de wetgeving verankerd.

4.98.  In algemene zin valt de vordering, gegeven de daarvoor door Urgenda aangevoerde gronden, niet buiten het hier voor de rechter afgebakende domein. Het gaat in de kern om rechtsbescherming en om een in dat kader vereiste “rechtstoetsing”. Dit neemt niet weg dat toewijzing van een of meer onderdelen van de vordering ook politieke consequenties kan hebben en in zoverre de politieke besluitvorming kan doorkruisen. Maar dat is in een rechtsstaat inherent aan de rol van de rechter ten opzichte van overheidsorganen. Zo vormt ook de mogelijkheid — en in deze zaak zelfs de zekerheid — dat de kwestie ook en vooral onderwerp van politieke besluitvorming is, geen grond om de rechter te beperken in zijn opdracht en bevoegdheid om een rechtsgeschil te beslechten. Voor de totstandkoming van rechtsbeslissingen van de rechter is de vraag naar het al dan niet bestaan van een “politiek draagvlak” voor de uitkomst daarvan niet relevant. Dit neemt niet weg dat de zojuist bedoelde eis tot terughoudendheid bij beslissingen met niet of niet goed overzienbare gevolgen voor derden, in volle omvang bestaat.

4.99.  De rechtbank stelt vast dat de Staat niet heeft gesteld dat voor hem rechtens of in feitelijke zin niet de mogelijkheid bestaat om verdergaande maatregelen te treffen dan in het huidige nationale klimaatbeleid besloten liggen. Dit volgt reeds uit het gegeven dat de EU bereid is tot verdergaande doelstellingen indien ook andere landen meer doen dan thans te verwachten valt. De Staat betoogt ook niet dat de rechtbank overeenkomstige toepassing moet geven aan artikel 6:168 lid 1 BW, dat de mogelijkheid biedt dat de rechter een vordering die strekt tot een verbod van een onrechtmatige gedraging, afwijst op de grond dat deze gedraging behoort te worden geduld als gevolg van zwaarwegende maatschappelijke belangen. In deze zaak doet zich naar het oordeel van de rechtbank het tegendeel voor, namelijk dat op grond van tussen partijen vaststaande feiten zich de noodzaak voordoet dat de Staat verder strekkende maatregelen neemt om de tweegradendoelstelling te bereiken.

4.100.  Afzonderlijke bespreking behoeft in dit verband het gegeven dat klimaatbeleid, hoezeer dit óók op het niveau van de afzonderlijke staten vorm kan krijgen, in belangrijke mate internationaal tot stand komt. De Staat heeft aangevoerd dat in geval van toewijzing van het gevorderde reductiebevel de onderhandelingspositie van Nederland bij bijvoorbeeld de conferentie in Parijs van eind 2015 wordt geschaad. Dit argument heeft naar het oordeel van de rechtbank geen zelfstandige betekenis in dit opzicht dat — als geoordeeld wordt dat de Staat ten opzichte van Urgenda rechtens verplicht is een bepaald doel te bereiken — het de regering niet vrijstaat die plicht te veronachtzamen in het kader van onderhandelingen in internationaal verband. Wel geldt ook hier dat de mogelijkheid dat de gevolgen van een ingrijpen van de rechter niet goed zijn te overzien, de rechtbank tot terughoudendheid noopt.

4.101.  Bij dit alles is van belang dat de hier besproken vordering niet strekt tot een gebod of bevel aan de Staat om bepaalde maatregelen van wetgeving of beleid te treffen. In geval van toewijzing van de vordering behoudt de Staat de volle, bij uitstek aan hem toekomende, vrijheid om te bepalen op welke wijze hij gevolg geeft aan het desbetreffende bevel. Ook hierbij houdt de rechtbank rekening met het gegeven dat de Staat niet heeft gesteld dat hij feitelijk in de onmogelijkheid verkeert om het bevel uit te voeren. En ook hier geldt dat de Staat niet heeft betoogd dat andere, fundamentele, belangen die hij ook moet behartigen, hierdoor zouden worden geschaad.

4.102.  De rechtbank komt ten aanzien van de hier besproken kwestie tot de slotsom dat de aspecten die samenhangen met de trias politica, niet in algemene zin een belemmering vormen voor toewijzing van een of meer onderdelen van de vordering, en in het bijzonder niet voor het geven van het bedoelde reductiebevel. De terughoudendheid die de rechter past leidt niet tot een verdere beperking dan die welke voortvloeit uit de eerder besproken beleidsvrijheid van de Staat.

F.  Gevolgen van het voorgaande voor de onderdelen van de vordering

Het reductiebevel

4.103.  De kern van de vordering van Urgenda wordt gevormd door het al meermalen besproken onderdeel 7. Op grond van al het voorgaande is dit onderdeel in zijn primaire vorm toewijsbaar, met dien verstande dat voor een bevel dat verder strekt dan een reductie met 25%, de ondergrens van de bandbreedte van 25–40%, onvoldoende grond bestaat. Voor het meerdere wordt dit onderdeel van de vordering dus afgewezen.

De verklaringen voor recht

4.104.  Urgenda heeft aanvankelijk gevorderd dat de rechtbank de Staat beveelt tot een emissiereductie van 40% , of minimaal 25%, per eind 2020 ten opzichte van 1990 en voor recht verklaart dat de Staat onrechtmatig handelt indien hij niet tot die reductie overgaat. Bij conclusie van repliek heeft Urgenda haar eis gewijzigd met onder meer de toelichting dat zij zich realiseert dat met het gevorderde reductiebevel “hoog” wordt ingezet. De eiswijziging voorziet in diverse verklaringen voor recht waarmee deelvragen aan de orde komen die de rechtbank toch al dient te beantwoorden als “opstap” naar de beoordeling van de vordering inzake het reductiebevel. Urgenda heeft tijdens de pleitzitting een bevestigend antwoord gegeven op de vraag van de rechtbank of deze verklaringen voor recht “los verkrijgbaar” zijn, waarmee is bedoeld: los van het reductiebevel, voor het geval dat het bevel niet toewijsbaar zou zijn. In dit verband heeft Urgenda verklaard dat de afzonderlijke verklaringen voor recht voor haar van belang zijn omdat zij kunnen bijdragen aan het realiseren van haar doelstellingen. Daarmee kan volgens haar ook draagvlak worden gecreëerd en kan een discussie op gang komen. Verder dienen de verklaringen voor recht het belang van emotionele genoegdoening. Ter zitting heeft Urgenda voorts herhaald dat de verklaringen kunnen worden gezien als de stappen die de rechtbank moet zetten om tot het reductiebevel te komen.

4.105.  Nu de rechtbank het gevorderde reductiebevel op de zojuist bedoelde wijze toewijsbaar acht, is zij van oordeel dat Urgenda geen voldoende belang heeft bij toewijzing van de gevorderde verklaringen voor recht, die in 3.1 onder 1–6 zijn weergegeven. Mede gelet op de aangehaalde toelichting van Urgenda valt immers niet in te zien wat dergelijke verklaringen voor recht, wat daarvan verder ook zij, nog zouden kunnen toevoegen aan het door haar primair beoogde en inmiddels behaalde resultaat. De verweren van de Staat tegen deze onderdelen van de vordering behoeven daarom geen bespreking.

Het bevel tot informeren

4.106.  Ten aanzien van het tevens gevorderde bevel aan de Staat tot het informeren van het Nederlandse publiek op de door Urgenda gevorderde wijze overweegt de rechtbank als volgt. In de visie van Urgenda werkt de Staat mee aan valse publieksvoorlichting over de ernst en urgentie van de klimaatproblemen en wordt zij, Urgenda, hierdoor gehinderd bij het verwezenlijken van haar doelstellingen. Nu Urgenda heeft gesteld en de Staat niet heeft betwist dat eventuele toewijzing van de vordering kan bijdragen aan het realiseren van haar doelstellingen, in ieder geval kan bijdragen aan het creëren van draagvlak voor die doelstellingen of aan het op gang brengen van een discussie daarover, heeft Urgenda op zichzelf bezien voldoende belang bij de hierop betrekking hebbende onderdelen van haar vordering.

4.107.  Deze onderdelen zijn echter op inhoudelijke gronden niet toewijsbaar. Van de Staat mag worden verlangd dat hij de samenleving op een adequate wijze voorlicht over het door hem, in overeenstemming met de beslissing van deze rechtbank in deze zaak, te voeren klimaatbeleid. Er bestaat echter geen rechtsregel die de Staat voorschrijft om in een situatie als deze, waarin nog in het geheel niet duidelijk is welke maatregelen de Staat zal treffen, een publieke mededeling te doen of een waarschuwing te laten uitgaan met de inhoud als door Urgenda “gedicteerd”. De wijze waarop de Staat de samenleving over de risico’s van klimaatverandering en het — binnen de grenzen van het recht — te voeren klimaatbeleid wil informeren, staat bij uitstek te zijner vrije beoordeling. Er is geen reden om bij voorbaat aan te nemen dat de Staat dit niet, binnen die marges, op passende wijze zal doen. Dit betekent dat hier nu geen taak voor de rechter ligt.

G.  De ontvankelijkheid van Urgenda (optredend namens de volmachtgevers)

4.108.  Zoals aangekondigd in 4.10, komt de rechtbank thans terug op de positie van de 886 volmachtgevers voor wie Urgenda tevens opkomt.

4.109.  In 4.45 en 4.46 is overwogen dat Urgenda zelf geen beroep kan doen op de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM, maar dat deze verdragsverplichtingen wel mede invulling geven aan de (ongeschreven) zorgvuldigheidsnorm van artikel 6:162 BW die Urgenda jegens de Staat inroept. Tijdens de pleitzitting heeft Urgenda verklaard dat voor de vordering die is gebaseerd op de artikelen 2 en 8 van het EVRM de positie van de individuele eisers (haar volmachtgevers) “mogelijk sterker” is dan de positie van haarzelf. Op dit moment beschikt de rechtbank niet over voldoende gegevens van de afzonderlijke individuele eisers om te kunnen vaststellen dat dit belang inderdaad bestaat. Een nader onderzoek hiernaar kan echter achterwege blijven. Ook als kan worden aangenomen dat de individuele eisers zich inderdaad wél op de artikelen 2 en 8 EVRM kunnen beroepen, zullen hun vorderingen niet (kunnen) leiden tot een andere beslissing dan die waarop Urgenda voor zichzelf aanspraak kan maken. In deze situatie hebben deze individuele eisers naar het oordeel van de rechtbank geen voldoende (eigen) belang naast dat van Urgenda. Mede op praktische gronden brengt dit de rechtbank tot afwijzing van de vordering voor zover deze namens hen is ingesteld. De ontvankelijkheidsvraag kan onbeantwoord blijven.

H.  De proceskosten

4.110.  Ten aanzien van het kernpunt van deze procedure, het bevel tot reductie van de uitstoot van broeikasgassen, is Urgenda in overwegende mate in het gelijk gesteld. Hieruit volgt dat de Staat moet worden veroordeeld in de proceskosten aan de zijde van Urgenda. Bij de begroting van deze kosten wijkt de rechtbank af van het gebruikelijke forfaitaire tarief, waarbij in geval van een vordering die, zoals de hier besprokene, “van onbepaalde waarde” is, een bedrag van € 452 per punt wordt toegekend. In deze uitzonderlijke zaak — uitzonderlijk door de ingewikkeldheid ervan én door de grote maatschappelijke en financiële belangen die daarbij aan de orde zijn — acht de rechtbank het maximale forfaitaire bedrag van € 3.210 per punt passend. Het salaris van de advocaat van Urgenda wordt daarom begroot op € 12.840 (vier punten à € 3.210). De verschotten aan de zijde van Urgenda hebben in totaal € 681,82 bedragen (€ 92,82 incl. btw wegens de kosten van de dagvaarding en € 589 wegens het griffierecht). De Staat wordt dus veroordeeld tot betaling van € 13.521,82 wegens de proceskosten aan de zijde van Urgenda, te vermeerderen met de wettelijke rente zoals gevorderd. Voor veroordeling in de nakosten bestaat geen grond, nu de kostenveroordeling ook voor deze nakosten een executoriale titel oplevert. Voor een kostenveroordeling ten laste van de individuele eisers voor wie Urgenda optreedt ziet de rechtbank geen reden. Dit leidt tot de hierna te vermelden beslissing op dit punt.

De beslissing

De rechtbank:

5.1.  beveelt de Staat om, op de vordering van Urgenda, voor zover optredend voor zichzelf, het gezamenlijke volume van de jaarlijkse Nederlandse emissies van broeikasgassen zodanig te beperken of te doen beperken dat dit volume aan het einde van het jaar 2020 met ten minste 25% zal zijn verminderd in vergelijking met het niveau van het jaar 1990;

5.2.  veroordeelt de Staat in de kosten van deze procedure aan de zijde van Urgenda (optredend voor zichzelf) en begroot deze kosten op € 13.521,82, te vermeerderen met de wettelijke rente daarover, vanaf veertien dagen na dit vonnis;

5.3.  verklaart dit vonnis tot zover uitvoerbaar bij voorraad;

5.4.  compenseert de proceskosten voor het overige, in deze zin dat partijen in zoverre de eigen kosten dragen;

5.5.  wijst het meer of anders gevorderde af.

Dit vonnis is gewezen door mr. H.F.M. Hofhuis, mr. J.W. Bockwinkel en mr. I. Brand en in het openbaar uitgesproken op 24 juni 2015.26

w.g. de griffier w.g. de voorzitter

 

Footnotes:

2  Synthesis Report 2007, pp. 64/65; Exhibit U9 (Urgenda’s Exhibits are hereinafter expressed with a number after the letter U; and the State’s Exhibits with a number after the letter S).

3  Table from: Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, Chapter 3: Issues related to mitigation in the longterm context, p. 229, Exhibit U43.

4  See note 2, p. 227.

5  Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, Chapter 13: Policies, Instruments and Co-operative Arrangements, p. 776, prod. U42.

6  See the Technical Summary named in 2.16, p. 33.

7  Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Summary for Policymakers of Working Group I, pp. 2, 3 and 17, Exhibit U6.

8  Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Summary for Policymakers of Working Group III, pp. 1013, Exhibit U91.

9  See note 7, p. 6

10  See note 7, p. 9.

[Note 1:  Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Technical Summary, pages 39 and 90, and Chapter 13, page 776.]”

11  See: http://unfccc.int, FCC/KP/CMP/2010/12/Add.1, p. 3, and also Exhibit U89, which contains the draft decision.

12  COM (2007) 2 final, Exhibit U24.

13  COM (2008) 16 final, Exhibit U30.

14  COM (2010) 265 final, Exhibit U29.

15  COM (2011) 112 final.

16  2011/2095 (INI).

17  COM (2014) 15 final.

18  EUCO 169/14.

19  COM (2015) 81 final.

20  Parliamentary Papers II, 2010/11, 32 667, no. 3, pp. 9/10.

[Note 1:  Decision No. 406/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of the European Union of 23 April 2009 on the effort of Member States to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to meet the Community’s greenhouse gas emission reduction commitments up to 2020 (OJEU L 140).]”

21  Parliamentary Papers II, 2013/14, 32 813, no. 70, pp. 16, 19 and 20; Exhibit S2.

[Note 20:  This concerns the following targets:

  • •  A mean reduction of 6% over 2008–2012 compared to 1990 for the Netherlands as a whole (Kyoto target).

  • •  In 2020 a 21% reduction of emissions that fall below the ETS compared to 2005 (below a European ceiling).

  • •  In 2020 a 16% reduction compared to 2005 for non-ETS sectors.]”

22  Kamerstukken II 1991/92, 22 486, nr. 3, p. 22.

24  See note 2, p. 199.

25  See among other sources, E. Bauw, Green Series, Unlawful Act (Onrechtmatige daad), scheme from Book 6 of the Dutch Civil Code, note 12, W. Braams, A. van Rijn and M. Scheltema, Climate and Law, Deventer: Kluwer 2010, p. 5 and Chr. H. van Dijk, Private-law liability for global warming, NJB 2007, p. 2333.

26  M. Goote and E. Hey, Chapter 19: International Environmental Law (Internationaal milieurecht), in N. Horbach, R. Lefeber, and O. Ribbelink (ed.), International Law Manual (Handboek Internationaal Recht), The Hague: T.M.C. Asser press 2007, p. 19–21.

27  type:

1  Synthesis Report 2007, pp. 64/65; prod. U9 (de producties van Urgenda worden hierna uitgeduid met het productienummer na de letter U; de producties van de Staat met het productienummer na de letter S).

2  Tabel uit: Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, Chapter 3: Issues related to mitigation in the long-term context, p. 229, prod. U43.

3  Zie noot 2, p. 227.

4  Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change, Chapter 13: Policies, instruments and co-operative arrangements, p. 776, prod. U42.

5  Zie de in 2.16 genoemde Technical Summary, p. 33.

6  Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Summary for Policymakers, p. 2, 3 en 17, prod. U6.

7  Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Summary for Policymakers, p. 10–13, prod. U91.

8  Zie noot 7, p. 6

9  Zie noot 7, p. 9.

[Noot 1:  Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Technical Summary, pages 39 and 90, and Chapter 13, page 776.]”

10  Zie: http://unfccc.int, FCC/KP/CMP/2010/12/Add.1, p. 3, en ook prod. U89, waarin de Draft decision is opgenomen.

11  COM (2007) 2 definitief, prod. U24.

12  COM (2008) 16 definitief, prod. U30.

13  COM (2010) 265 definitief, prod. U29.

14  COM (2011) 112 definitief.

15  2011/2095 (INI).

16  COM (2014) 15 definitief.

17  EUCO 169/14.

18  COM (2015) 81 definitief.

19  Kamerstukken II, 2010/11, 32 667, nr. 3, p. 9/10.

[Noot 1:  Beschikking nr. 406/2009/EG van het Europees Parlement en de Raad van de Europese Unie van 23 april 2009 inzake de inspanningen van de lidstaten om hun broeikasgasemissies te verminderen om aan de verbintenissen van de Gemeenschap op het gebied van het verminderen van broeikasgassen tot 2020 te voldoen (PbEU L 140).]”

20  Kamerstukken II, 2013/14, 32 813, nr. 70, p. 16, 19 en 20; prod. S2.

[Noot 20:  Het gaat om de volgende doelen:

  • •  Gemiddeld over 2008–2012 6% reductie t.o.v. 1990 voor Nederland als geheel (Kyoto-doel).

  • •  In 2020 21% reductie t.o.v. 2005 van de emissies die onder het ETS vallen (onder een Europees plafond).

  • •  In 2020 16% reductie t.o.v. 2005 voor de sectoren die niet onder het ETS vallen.]”

21  Kamerstukken II 1991/92, 22 486, nr. 3, p. 22.

23  Zie noot 2, p. 199.

24  Zie onder meer: E. Bauw, Groene Serie Onrechtmatige daad, regeling Boek 6 BW, aant. 12, W. Braams, A. van Rijn en M. Scheltema, Klimaat en recht, Deventer: Kluwer 2010, p. 5 en Chr. H. van Dijk, Privaatrechtelijke aansprakelijkheid voor opwarming van de aarde, NJB 2007, p. 2333.

25  M. Goote en E. Hey, Hoofdstuk 19: Internationaal milieurecht, in N. Horbach, R. Lefeber, en O. Ribbelink (red.), Handboek Internationaal Recht, Den Haag: T.M.C. Asser Press 2007, p. 19–21.

26  type: