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Volume II, Part V Invalidity, Termination and Suspension of the Operation of Treaties, s.5 Consequence of the Invalidity, Termination or Suspension of the Operation of a Treaty, Art.70 1969 Vienna Convention »

Hervé Ascensio
From: The Vienna Conventions on the Law of Treaties
Edited By: Olivier Corten, Pierre Klein
Capotorti, F. , ‘L'extinction et la suspension des traités’, RCADI , 1971-III, vol. 134, pp 419–587 do Nascimento e Silva, G. E. , ‘Le facteur temps et les traités’, RCADI , 1977-I, vol. 154, pp 215–97 Fitzmaurice, Sir Gerald , Second Report on the Law of Treaties , Doc. A/CN.4/107, YILC , 1957, vol. II, pp 16 ff ——  The Law and Procedure of the International Court of Justice (Cambridge: Grotius, 1986), vol. I, p 427 Frumer, P., ‘Dénonciation des traités et remise en cause de la compétence des organes de contrôle. A propos de quelques entraves étatiques récentes...

Volume II, Part V Invalidity, Termination and Suspension of the Operation of Treaties, s.5 Consequence of the Invalidity, Termination or Suspension of the Operation of a Treaty, Art.70 1986 Vienna Convention »

Hervé Ascensio
From: The Vienna Conventions on the Law of Treaties
Edited By: Olivier Corten, Pierre Klein
1. Article 70 of the 1986 Vienna Convention reproduces the terms of Article 70 of the 1969 Vienna Convention word for word, with the sole exception of the addition of ‘or an/that international organization’ in two places in paragraph 2. The general perspective retained by the ILC Special Rapporteur, Paul Reuter, originating in his First Report on the issue of treaties concluded between States and international organizations or between two or several international organizations, consisted in following the model of the 1969 Vienna Convention as much as possible. 1...

Volume I, s.2 Structure of the ICC, 8 Privileges and Immunities »

Hervé Ascensio
From: The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
Edited By: Professor Antonio Cassese, Professor Paola Gaeta, Mr John R.W.D. Jones
Privileges and immunities are essential in order to preserve the independence and impartiality of international courts and tribunals. Therefore, Article 48 of the Statute of the ICC provides for such privileges and immunities for the Court itself (Article 48(1) ), for the personnel of the Court—including the judges, the Prosecutor, the Registrar, and their staff—(Article 48(2) and (3) ), and for counsel, experts, and witnesses (Article 48(4) ), as well as setting out the conditions for waiving these privileges and immunities in each case (Article 48(5) ). However,...