Jump to Content Jump to Main Navigation

You are looking at 110 of 16 results

Contributor: Antkowiak, Thomas M x
Clear All

1 Introduction, IV The Book’s Structure and Methodology »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza

Contents »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza

Dedication »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza

6 Due Process and Judicial Protection »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza
Article 8, the Convention’s primary due process provision, is called “Right to a Fair Trial.” However, the Article goes far beyond trials and even judicial matters, regulating proceedings of “any public authority, whether administrative, legislative or judicial, which, through its decisions determines individual rights and obligations.” These broad protections have become more expansive still through numerous judgments of the Inter-American Court. The Convention’s Article 25, Right to Judicial Protection, primarily referred to amparo—a “simple and prompt” judicial recourse to protect “fundamental rights” recognized in either State law or in the American Convention, and includes the writ of habeas corpus. Yet the Court has expanded the remedies of Article 25 beyond amparo, and the Article’s full content has become unsettled. This owes, at least in part, to the Court’s frequent method of combining Articles 8 and 25 in its judgments; the practice has hindered the latter provision’s meticulous development.

2 Equality »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza
The Convention’s Article 24 establishes two critical, autonomous rights: the right to equality before the law and the right to equal protection of the law. The Inter-American Court has declared equality to constitute a jus cogens principle, which would render it binding for all States, and expanded State obligations in this area. The Court broadly condemns many forms of discrimination, and promotes affirmative action programs. However, its standards of review and even standards of proof for differential treatment remain uncertain. Further, the Court’s interpretation of Article 24 and Article 1, both as separate concepts and in relation to each other, has been inconsistent and, more recently, problematic. The Tribunal now considers Article 24’s scope to be more limited than that of the non-discrimination provision of Article 1(1). Among other objections, this approach conflicts with the Court’s prior jurisprudence, which in turn reflected international understandings of equality principles.

7 Freedom of Expression »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza
The Convention was designed to provide vibrant guarantees for the freedom of thought and expression. Among treaties, it contains the only prohibition against prior censorship and features an innovative provision on “indirect” restrictions to expression. Interpreting Article 13, the Court became the first international human rights tribunal to establish the right to access State-held information. The Court has issued several decisions that condemned censorship and disproportionate sanctions on expression, protecting the Article 13 rights of individuals and society at large. In 2008, however, the Court began to allow more constraints on expression and to require more responsibilities of speakers. We argue that the Court must change its recent approach and prohibit criminal sanctions on expression that are used by States to protect honor and reputation. The Tribunal also must develop clear definitions and rules concerning any sanctions on speech, with the goal to promote vigorous public debate.

4 Humane Treatment »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza
Whereas other instruments only listed prohibited forms of conduct, the Convention’s Article 5 was innovative for general human rights treaties because it established an autonomous right: “Every person has the right to have his physical, mental, and moral integrity respected.” Later, other treaties followed this example and declared rights to personal integrity and human dignity. Over the last two decades, the Inter-American Court—drawing from regional human rights instruments and the jurisprudence of the European Court and the Inter-American Commission—has delivered a number of authoritative decisions. These judgments have served to expand conceptions of torture and ill-treatment, broaden State obligations, condemn gender violence, and provide wide-ranging redress to victims. Nevertheless, the Court has not always been consistent in its approaches to Article 5, and more recently has shown a troubling reluctance to find torture and other violations in certain cases.

Index »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza

1 Introduction, II The Inter-American Human Rights System’s Impact, Major Institutions, and Legal Instruments »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza

1 Introduction, III Key Developments and Critiques of the Inter-American Jurisprudence »

From: The American Convention on Human Rights: Essential Rights
Thomas M. Antkowiak, Alejandra Gonza