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The Oxford Handbook of International Adjudication edited by Romano, Cesare P R; Alter, Karen J; Shany, Yuval (1st December 2013)

Notes on the Contributors

Edited By: Cesare P R Romano, Karen Alter, Yuval Shany

From: The Oxford Handbook of International Adjudication

Edited By: Cesare P R Romano, Karen Alter, Yuval Shany

Editors

  • Karen J Alter is Professor of Political Science and Law at Northwestern University, and a permanent visiting professor at the iCourts Center for Excellence, University of Copenhagen Faculty of Law. Alter is author of The European Court’s Political Power (Oxford University Press 2009), Establishing the Supremacy of European Law (Oxford University Press 2001), and The New Terrain of International Law: Courts, Politics, Rights (Princeton University Press 2014).

  • Cesare PR Romano is Professor of Law and W Joseph Ford Fellow at Loyola Law School Los Angeles. He has degrees in political science (Università degli Studi di Milano: Laurea, 1992; Istituto per gli Studi di Politica Internazionale, Diploma, 1993); international relations (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies: Diplôme d’Études Supérieures, 1995, and Ph.D., 1999); and law (New York University: LL.M., 1997). His expertise is in international law, but he also has substantial background in diplomatic history and economics. In 1997, he co-founded the Project on International Courts and Tribunals, which he continues to co-direct. In 2012, he became Senior Fellow of Pluricourts, the center of excellence for the study of international courts of the Faculty of Law of the University of Oslo, and of iCourts, the Danish National Research Foundation’s center of excellence for international courts.

  • Yuval Shany is the Hersch Lauterpacht Chair in International Law and Dean of the Law Faculty of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He also serves currently as a member of the UN Human Rights Committee, a senior fellow at the Israel Democracy Institute, and a co-director in the Project on International Courts and Tribunals (PICT). Shany has degrees in law from the Hebrew University (LL.B., 1995 cum laude), New York University (LL.M., 1997) and the University of London (Ph.D., 2001). He has published a large number of books and articles on international courts and arbitration tribunals, international human rights law, international humanitarian law, and international criminal law. He is the recipient of the 2004 American Society of International Law book award (creative legal scholarship) and a 2008 recipient of a European Research Council grant awarded to pioneering research leaders. Shany has taught in a number of law schools in and outside Israel, and has been in recent years a research fellow at Harvard and Amsterdam Universities and the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg.

(p. lxxxvi) Contributors

  • José E Alvarez is the Herbert and Rose Rubin Professor of International Law at New York University Law School where he directs the graduate program in International Legal Studies. Previously he was the Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy and the executive director of the Center on Global Legal Problems at Columbia Law School. He has also taught at the law schools at the University of Michigan and George Washington University. He is a past president of the American Society of International Law (ASIL) and served as an advisor to the first prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. He is co-editor in chief of the American Journal of International Law.

  • Chittharanjan F Amerasinghe ,B.A., LL.B., Ph.D. (Public International Law), LL.D. (Public International Law, Constitutional Law, Roman-Dutch Private Law)—Cambridge, UK; LL.M. (Public International Law)—Harvard, USA; Ph.D. (Roman-Dutch Private Law)—University of Ceylon; Member, Institut de droit international. Formerly, Judge, UN Administrative Tribunal; Judge, Commonwealth Secretariat Tribunal; Registrar, World Bank Administrative Tribunal; Full Professor of Law, University of Ceylon; Adjunct Professor of International Law, American University School of Law, USA; Fellow, Trinity Hall, Cambridge University (UK). Certificate of Merit, American Society of International Law (1988/9), Yorke Prize (1964), Cambridge University, UK. He has published extensively books, articles, and essays on, inter alia, public international law and international administrative law, and has had a consulting practice in those fields.

  • Carl Baudenbacher has been President of the EFTA Court since 2003, and Judge since 1995. Former Member of the Supreme Court of the Principality of Liechtenstein. Full Professor of Private, Commercial and Economic Law at the University of St. Gallen HSG, Former Permanent Visiting Professor at the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Samantha Besson is Professor of Public International Law and European Law at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) and Co-Director of the European Law Institute of the Universities of Bern, Fribourg and Neuchâtel (Switzerland). Her publications and research interests lie in European law and public international law, legal and political philosophy, and in particular in human rights law and theory.

  • Armin von Bogdandy is the Director of the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law at Heidelberg University, and Professor at the Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt. He is President of the OECD Nuclear Energy Tribunal and a member of the Scientific Committee of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (2008–2013).

  • Chester Brown is Professor of International Law and International Arbitration at the Faculty of Law, University of Sydney; a barrister at 7 Selborne Chambers, Sydney, (p. lxxxvii) and a door tenant at Essex Court Chambers, London. He is the author of A Common Law of International Adjudication (Oxford University Press 2007).

  • David D Caron is Dean of The Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College, London. He served as a Commissioner with the United Nations Compensation Commission, and worked with or appeared before the Marshall Island Nuclear Claims Tribunal, the Eritrea–Ethiopia Claims Commission, and the Iran–United States Claims Tribunal. He also served as a member of the PCA Steering Committee on International Mass Claims.

  • Stéphanie Cartier is a Legal Officer with the UN Office of Legal Affairs (OLA). Prior to joining OLA, she taught at Fordham University and collaborated with the Brandeis Institute for International Judges and the Project on International Courts and Tribunals. She also worked with human rights NGOs, the ILO, and the WTO Appellate Body. Stephanie earned a B.C.L. and LL.B. from McGill, a Master’s from the GIIDS, Geneva, and a Ph.D. from Maastricht University.

  • Michael-James Clifton is Legal Secretary in the President’s Chambers of the EFTA Court. He obtained his LL.B. (EU) from the University of Leicester and graduated cum laude and Valedictorian in European Business Law from Leiden University. Called to the Bar in 2009. Formerly, Associate at VVGB in Brussels and stagiaire to ECJ Advocate-General Eleanor Sharpston.

  • Pierre-Marie Dupuy is Emeritus Professor at the University of Paris (Panthéon-Assas) and at The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. He also held the Chair of General International Law at the European University Institute, Florence (2000–2008). Professor Dupuy has wide experience in international legal practice, in particular as counsel for governments in numerous cases before the ICJ as well as an international arbitrator. He is a member of the Institut de Droit International.

  • Solomon T Ebobrah , LL.B. (Rivers State University); LL.M., LL.D. (University of Pretoria) is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, Niger Delta University, Nigeria and an Extra-Ordinary Lecturer with the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria. He is an editor of the African Human Rights Law Journal.

  • Kate Gibson is the Lead Counsel of Justin Mugenzi at the ICTR, and Co-Counsel of Charles Taylor at the SCSL. She has previously worked in the ICTY Appeals Chamber, as a victims’ lawyer at the ECCC, and on defense teams at the ICC and ICTR. She is admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Queensland, Australia, and holds an LL.M. from Cambridge University.

  • Tom Ginsburg is the Leo Spitz Professor of International Law at the University of Chicago, where he also holds an appointment in the Political Science Department. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He holds B.A., J.D., and (p. lxxxviii) Ph.D. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley. He currently co-directs the Comparative Constitutions Project, a National Science Foundation-funded data set cataloging the world’s constitutions since 1789. His recent co-authored book, The Endurance of National Constitutions (2009), won the best book award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association. His other books include Judicial Review in New Democracies (2003), Administrative Law and Governance in Asia (2008), Rule By Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes (with Tamir Moustafa, 2008), and Comparative Constitutional Law (with Rosalind Dixon, 2011). Before teaching law, he served as a legal advisor at the Iran–US Claims Tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, and he has consulted with numerous international development agencies and governments on legal and constitutional reform.

  • Christine Gray is Professor of International Law at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge. Her first major publication was Judicial Remedies in International Law (Oxford University Press 1987), and she has maintained an interest in this area. Her recent work has mainly focused on the use of force.

  • Laurence R Helfer is the Harry R Chadwick, Sr. Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law, where he co-directs the Center for International and Comparative Law. He has authored more than 60 publications on his diverse research interests, which include human rights, international adjudication, and interdisciplinary analysis of international institutions.

  • Kevin Jon Heller is Associate Professor and Reader at Melbourne Law School. His book The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law was published by Oxford University Press in 2011. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Leiden University and a J.D. from Stanford Law School.

  • Cristina Hoss is a Legal Officer with the ICJ and Visiting Lecturer at Leiden University. Before joining the ICJ staff in 2005, Cristina was a Research Fellow at the Max-Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and Public International Law in Heidelberg. Cristina earned her Masters and Ph.D. in law from the University of Paris II.

  • Alexandra Huneeus is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Wisconsin. Her current research examines the evolution of regional human rights systems, with a focus on the Inter-American Court. Her article “International Criminal Law by Other Means: the Quasi-Criminal Jurisdiction of the Human Rights Courts” will appear in the American Journal of International Law (2013).

  • Thordis Ingadottir is Associate Professor at Reykjavik University. She has law degrees from the University of Iceland and New York University School of Law. She is a Co-Director of the Project on International Courts and Tribunals (PICT) and (p. lxxxix) the Director of the Project on the Impact of International Proceedings on National Proceedings in Mass Atrocity Situations (DOMAC).

  • Natalie Klein is the Dean of Macquarie Law School, Macquarie University, Australia, where her teaching and research focus on the law of the sea and international dispute settlement. Prior to joining Macquarie, she worked in international arbitration and litigation at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, served as counsel to Eritrea, and was a consultant at the UN.

  • Ruth Mackenzie is Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Westminster. She was previously Principal Research Fellow and Deputy Director at the Centre for International Courts and Tribunals at University College London. Ruth has been associated with the Project on International Courts and Tribunals since its inception in 1997. She was a member of the Steering Committee of the DOMAC research project on the Impact of International Courts on Domestic Criminal Procedures in Mass Atrocity Cases. Ruth has also worked extensively in the field of international environmental law.

  • Mikael Rask Madsen is Professor of Law at the University of Copenhagen and Director of iCourts—The Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre of Excellence for International Courts. Trained as both a lawyer and a sociologist, his work concerns the interface of international courts, transnational elites, and the structuring of global society.

  • Sean D Murphy is the Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law at George Washington University and a Member of the UN International Law Commission. He has served on the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law and in the US Department of State Legal Adviser’s Office.

  • Yael Naggan (LL.B. and B.A. in International Relations, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 2013) is a Teaching Assistant at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

  • André Nollkaemper is Professor of Public International Law and Vice-Dean for Research at the Faculty of Law of the University of Amsterdam. He is also (external) Advisor to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, Vice-President of the Board of the European Society of International Law and Member of the Royal Academy of Sciences of the Netherlands. He is Editor-in-Chief of International Law in Domestic Courts (Oxford University Press).

  • Mary Ellen O’Connell holds the Robert and Marion Short Chair in Law and is Research Professor of International Dispute Resolution at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. She has also taught at The Ohio State University; the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies at Garmisch, Germany; the Johns Hopkins University Nitze School of Advanced (p. xc) International Studies, Bologna, Italy; and Indiana University, Bloomington. She practiced law with the Washington, D.C. law firm of Covington & Burling. Her research interests are in general international law, international legal theory, international law on the use of force, and international dispute resolution. She has published widely on these subjects, including a casebook, International Dispute Resolution, Cases and Materials (2nd edn, Carolina 2012).

  • Mark A Pollack is Professor of Political Science and Jean Monnet Chair ad personam at Temple University. His most recent book is Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Law and International Relations: The State of the Art, co-edited with Jeffrey L. Dunoff (Cambridge University Press 2013).

  • Anna Riddell is Publications Editor at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law in London, and currently finishing her Ph.D. at the European University Institute in Florence. Her thesis is on the connection between international environmental protection and human rights under the supervision of Professor Francesco Francioni. Prior to commencing the Ph.D., she was a Research Fellow in Public International Law at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law, and Director of the Institute’s Project on Evidence in International Courts and Tribunals. In 2009 she co-authored the study “Evidence Before the International Court of Justice,” published by the Institute, which was cited with approval in the International Court of Justice by Judges Al-Khasawneh and Simma in their Dissenting Opinion in the Case Concerning Pulp Mills on the River Uruguay (Argentina v. Uruguay) (20 April 2010). She has also published articles on the subject of evidence in international litigation in several referred journals. She holds LL.M.s from the European University Institute and the University of Exeter (European Law), an M.A. from Brasenose College, Oxford, and was called to the Bar of England and Wales by Lincoln’s Inn in 2005.

  • Yaël Ronen (Ph.D., Cambridge 2006) is Senior Lecturer at Sha’arei Mishpat College in Hod Hasharon, Israel. Her publications include, with Shabtai Rosenne, Law and Practice of the International Court (Brill 2006), as well as books and articles on human rights, international humanitarian law, and territorial status.

  • William A Schabas is Professor of International Law at Middlesex University in London. He is also professor of international criminal law and human rights at Leiden University, emeritus professor of human rights law at the National University of Ireland Galway and honorary chairman of the Irish Centre for Human Rights.

  • Christoph Schreuer is a graduate of the Universities of Vienna, Cambridge and Yale. He is a former Professor at Johns Hopkins University and University of Vienna, member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration and ICSID Panel of Arbitrators, arbitrator in ICSID and UNCITRAL cases.

  • (p. xci) Francesco Sebregondi is an architect, a designer, and a researcher within the European Research Council-funded project Forensic Architecture, based at Goldsmiths, University of London. His research explores the agency of architecture as media, with a focus on the representation of contemporary spatial problems and phenomena.

  • Anja Seibert-Fohr is Professor of International Law at Goettingen University Law School in Germany, and a member of the UN Human Rights Committee. Between 2008 and 2013, she directed the Minerva Research Group on Judicial Independence at the Max-Planck-Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg.

  • Maya Steinitz is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Iowa College of Law. Professor Steinitz teaches, researches, and practices widely in public and business international law and dispute resolution. Prior to joining the University of Iowa she taught at Columbia Law School. She served as a litigator at Latham & Watkins and clerked for Israeli Supreme Court Justice Esther Hayut. She currently serves as an arbitrator and arbitration expert.

  • Eran Sthoeger is a member of several legal teams in interstate disputes, past and present, and a Research Analyst at Security Council Report, New York. He holds an LL.M. from New York University in International Legal Studies and an LL.B. in law, history, and Jewish history from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

  • Leigh Swigart is Director of programs in international justice and society at the International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life at Brandeis University. She oversees the Brandeis Institute for International Judges and is the author (with Cesare P.R. Romano and Daniel Terris) of The International Judge: An Introduction to the Men and Women Who Decide the World’s Cases (Brandeis University Press/Oxford University Press 2007).

  • Daniel Terris is Director of the International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life at Brandeis University. He is the founder of the Brandeis Institute for International Judges and the author (with Cesare P.R. Romano and Leigh Swigart) of The International Judge: An Introduction to the Men and Women Who Decide the World’s Cases (Brandeis University Press/Oxford University Press 2007).

  • Lenore VanderZee is a Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science and Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. She also holds a J.D. and LL.M. from Notre Dame Law School. While she is completing her dissertation, she is serving as the President’s Chief of Staff at SUNY Canton and teaches in its Social Sciences department.

  • Antoine Vauchez is a Research Professor at the Centre européen de sociologie et science politique (Université Paris 1-Sorbonne and CNRS). He has recently published L’Union par le droit. L’invention d’un programme institutionnel pour l’Europe (Presses (p. xcii) de Sciences Po 2013) and an edited volume with Bruno de Witte: Lawyering Europe. European Law as a Transnational Social Field (Hart Publishing 2013).

  • Ingo Venzke is a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at the University of Amsterdam. He was previously a Hauser Research Scholar at New York University and a Research Fellow at the Max-Planck-Institute in Heidelberg. He is the author of How Interpretation Makes International Law: On Semantic Change and Normative Twists (Oxford University Press 2012).

  • Jorge E Viñuales is Harold Samuel Professor of Law and Environmental Policy at the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. He formerly held the Pictet Chair in International Environmental Law at The Graduate Institute, in Geneva, where he also directed the Program on Environmental Governance. Professor Viñuales has substantial experience as a practitioner, particularly in the areas of public international law, investment law, and environmental law.

  • Erik Voeten is the Peter F Krogh Associate Professor of Geopolitics and Justice in World Affairs at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and Department of Government. He received his Ph.D. in politics from Princeton. His main area of research is international law and institutions.

  • Michael Wood is a member of the International Law Commission. He is a barrister at 20 Essex Street, London, where he practices in the field of public international law—including before international courts and tribunals. He was a lawyer at the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office between 1970 and 2006.